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Old 02-11-2007, 02:21 PM   #21
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I had a daughter that was like that too. I had to make her understand the difference of eating because you are hungry or just bored! She would say she was hungry and I'd ask her if she was really hungry or bored. She'd answer, "bored I guess" and skip out of the kitchen. She's now 20 yrs. old, 6 feet tall and beautiful. It's hard now days with so many unhealthy options redily available. I hate fast food places. They didn't exist when I was growing up, but now.....wow..take your pick of cuisine.
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Old 02-11-2007, 03:02 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Yes, they DO have Sunny D in 6-0z bottles.
Exactly
you would not call a 6oz container a JUG
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:29 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkath
Is she really? Or is she bored?
A lot of times people (kids and adults) will munch from boredom. Or, because they're so used to eating and eating and eating that they assume it's time to chew again.

Perhaps when she has her healthy snacks, like the celery & apples, cut them up, put them in a baggie and take a walk. When you reach your destination (park or wherever sounds fun), take them out, along with a water bottle. After she's done, walk home. It's a good way to incorporate both exercise and limiting food intake.


That is a great idea! I will definitely incorporate that into our daily routine!
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:31 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
In my opinion any child who is over the 90th percentile for weight or height needs a thorough evaluation at a place where they know how to do that.

Don't know where you live but would get a referral to an endocrinologist at a first rate children's hospital, there are many around the country.

Just my opinion.

Thanks alot. I will definitely research that in my area. I will be making her an appt for the middle of next month and will ask about an endocrinologist.
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:32 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabbur
My niece is in the same boat. She's 8 turning 9 in April and wears a teen size 12-14. Her father is 6'5" so we know where she gets it. She loves fruit and drinks mostly water. My sister limits her sweets but doesn't deny them to her. Only one cookie etc. each day. We worry about her but the pediatrician doesn't want her to diet because of the nutritional factors kids need to grow. Since she is so tall as well, the few things I would suggest would to be to ask for some testing to be done. There are some simple xrays called bone age studies that will tell you what "age" her frame is. I would also want to have her thyroid checked. It's a simple blood test. This gland can go wacky even in young children and cause weight gain and abnormal growth. These may all check out fine but are worth investigating if you haven't already. Otherwise, don't stress. She'll pick up on the fact that you think there is a problem and it may lead to other issues down the road. Love her the way she is and give her the good foods she needs.

When I take her to the DR next month, she'll get her thyroid, and diabetes checked. That's what I am really concerned with since it runs in my husbands fam.
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Old 02-24-2007, 11:59 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Hi Nikki!! Your problem is very close to our heart, as the daughter of my partner is pretty much in a similar situation, except that she is already 11. She is 150cm in height (about 5ft) and weighs 77kg (almost 170lbs), she has to wear adult big size with legs and sleeves shortened, forget about cool pretty clothes, she has to do with whatever that she can fit into.

Like your daughter she doesn't eat THAT much, though her diet may not be very well balanced, and while she is never a sportive type, she is not a couch potato either, so logically she really shouldn't be in the form she is. She has been tested by various specialists, without anything definitive for the cause of her problem coming out. She is now on a trial diet and doing regular light exercise for a month, at this point she lost half kilo (about 1lb). Not a significant change, but at least she is not gaining at this moment....

It is good that you recognise the problem early on, please do whatever you can to get to the root of it, and try to find why she is in the condition she is. There are so many possibilities. It is great that your girl is healthy and happy, though, which is basically the most important thing. Try to keep her active, and on a healthy diet in the meantime, and always let her know what a special and beautiful child she is and how much she is loved. My very best wishes to you, and keep us posted on how she is doing by all means please!!

(((Hugs)))

WoW! I worries me a great deal because I want her to be healthy and happy. And kids nowadays are so cruel, I don't want her to have to go through that as well. And I will be taking her to the Dr to get her checked out to the fullest extent. I just want a happy, healthy, well-adjusted little girl and already she is starting to understand I can't pick her up anymore, and it just breaks my heart when she says "I'm too big?". When she's only 3. I've received many helpful tips and great advice on this matter. Thanks so much everyone! Will alert you with updates on this!
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Old 02-25-2007, 03:18 AM   #27
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Hi Poutine,

By all means have your daughter checked out by a doctor to see if she has any problems. However, certain people (my husband is one of them) simply have naturally a very low "calorie burn" rate. Folks like this are probably highly adapted to survive in adverse conditions, but we don't have those conditions nowadays.

My husband was always "the fat kid" in school, and he has always had a hard time keeping the weight off. I've worked hard to change his dietary habits, and here are some things that have worked for us:

1. High fiber foods fill you up without adding too many calories. Grapes work better than raisins, raw carrots (those little baby ones are nice) work better than cooked carrots, and whole-grain brown rice works better than pasta if you want to feel full without taking a second helping. Use fresh food whenever possible--frozen food second--canned food last.

2. Cheese, meat, and nuts are all calorie-rich protein foods, and should not be used in the same meal. It's cheese OR meat OR nuts, not cheese AND meat AND nuts! In measured amounts, please. (I'm not saying you shouldn't have some of each, but it is easier to limit input if you have just one in a meal.)

3. Empty calories--in candies, pastries, and the like--are your worst enemies. Because there is very little nutritional value in standard white flour and white sugar, your body wants more food, to fill in the missing nutrients. And if you give it more empty calories, it just wants more... You never find the "set point" for your appetite. Around here, we use frozen fruit instead of ice cream in the summertime, and I never buy treats to keep at home. If we want cookies, we have to either bake them from scratch (small batches only) or go out somewhere to have them! (I keep the sugar in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator, because I rarely use it.) This stops the mindless "snacking" on sweets.

4. If you are a slow burner of calories, you need to have some sort of organized exercises/sports in your life. In the doings of everyday life, you are a natural conserver of energy, so you need to have something that goes beyond everyday life. I'm not suggesting competitive sports, but something like dance classes for little ones (with pretty outfits!) that will get her moving more, and practice between classes.

5. Please don't use food as a reward. For years my husband would go on diets, and tell himself, "When I lose 10 pounds, I'm going to get myself the biggest chocolate milkshake in the world!!" And then he'd wonder why the pounds wouldn't stay off! Hugs and kisses and warm praise ought to be the best rewards for a three-year old.

6. Finally, on fruit juice--I use fresh or frozen juice diluted with 1/4 water in my house. You can't tell the difference taste-wise, but it removes a few calories. And cool, filtered water is the standard drink between meals.

Good luck. And give your little one a hug from me.
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Old 02-25-2007, 09:19 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexanFrench
Hi Poutine,

By all means have your daughter checked out by a doctor to see if she has any problems. However, certain people (my husband is one of them) simply have naturally a very low "calorie burn" rate. Folks like this are probably highly adapted to survive in adverse conditions, but we don't have those conditions nowadays.

My husband was always "the fat kid" in school, and he has always had a hard time keeping the weight off. I've worked hard to change his dietary habits, and here are some things that have worked for us:

1. High fiber foods fill you up without adding too many calories. Grapes work better than raisins, raw carrots (those little baby ones are nice) work better than cooked carrots, and whole-grain brown rice works better than pasta if you want to feel full without taking a second helping. Use fresh food whenever possible--frozen food second--canned food last.

2. Cheese, meat, and nuts are all calorie-rich protein foods, and should not be used in the same meal. It's cheese OR meat OR nuts, not cheese AND meat AND nuts! In measured amounts, please. (I'm not saying you shouldn't have some of each, but it is easier to limit input if you have just one in a meal.)

3. Empty calories--in candies, pastries, and the like--are your worst enemies. Because there is very little nutritional value in standard white flour and white sugar, your body wants more food, to fill in the missing nutrients. And if you give it more empty calories, it just wants more... You never find the "set point" for your appetite. Around here, we use frozen fruit instead of ice cream in the summertime, and I never buy treats to keep at home. If we want cookies, we have to either bake them from scratch (small batches only) or go out somewhere to have them! (I keep the sugar in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator, because I rarely use it.) This stops the mindless "snacking" on sweets.

4. If you are a slow burner of calories, you need to have some sort of organized exercises/sports in your life. In the doings of everyday life, you are a natural conserver of energy, so you need to have something that goes beyond everyday life. I'm not suggesting competitive sports, but something like dance classes for little ones (with pretty outfits!) that will get her moving more, and practice between classes.

5. Please don't use food as a reward. For years my husband would go on diets, and tell himself, "When I lose 10 pounds, I'm going to get myself the biggest chocolate milkshake in the world!!" And then he'd wonder why the pounds wouldn't stay off! Hugs and kisses and warm praise ought to be the best rewards for a three-year old.

6. Finally, on fruit juice--I use fresh or frozen juice diluted with 1/4 water in my house. You can't tell the difference taste-wise, but it removes a few calories. And cool, filtered water is the standard drink between meals.

Good luck. And give your little one a hug from me.


Thanks so much. This really helps. I do have an issue with rewarding her with food, well did, and now reward her with trips to "special places" like the zoo or the "Big park". Not sure if that's any better but....And since we just moved here (bentonville, AR) I still need to look into dance classes and soccer teams for 3 yr olds (she LOVES soccer). About #2: I had NO idea about combining all of those in one meal not being a good choice! About the candy...is calorie free candy ok? Or sugarfree I guess it is. And what's the deal with peanut butter? I've been told that PB is not really a good source of fiber and can contribute to weight gain. All she has it in is her PB&J for lunch. These posts have really helped me and knowing it's not too late to help her become healthier has given me the self confidence I really needed as a mother.
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Old 02-25-2007, 10:40 AM   #29
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I'm so glad you've gotten some great ideas to jumpstart your new methods for your daughter!
I have a feeling that with her rewards now being "places" rather than "goodies", not only will she be healthier, but you'll also get to know your new city much better!
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Old 02-26-2007, 01:54 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikkilcotie
Thanks so much. This really helps. I do have an issue with rewarding her with food, well did, and now reward her with trips to "special places" like the zoo or the "Big park". Not sure if that's any better but....And since we just moved here (bentonville, AR) I still need to look into dance classes and soccer teams for 3 yr olds (she LOVES soccer). About #2: I had NO idea about combining all of those in one meal not being a good choice! About the candy...is calorie free candy ok? Or sugarfree I guess it is. And what's the deal with peanut butter? I've been told that PB is not really a good source of fiber and can contribute to weight gain. All she has it in is her PB&J for lunch. These posts have really helped me and knowing it's not too late to help her become healthier has given me the self confidence I really needed as a mother.
We use the peanut butter that is only "peanuts and salt" and we pour off some of the oil and sometimes mix in a little locally-produced honey, instead of jelly. But what you really need to do is measure any nut butters you use--a measured teaspoonful is plenty for a slice of (whole-grain!) bread. And give her some nice fresh fruit with her sandwich.

If you can gradually substitute other treats, and limit the candy, you will be training your daughter to enjoy foods other than sweets, which will help her in the long run. This may well be a long-term problem for her, and something she will have to deal with all her life, as it is with my husband.

I'm sure you are a good mother!
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