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Old 03-24-2007, 04:08 PM   #1
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Calories per cup of homemade chicken stock?

I'm starting to do some calorie counting, and am having a hard time getting a fix on calories per cup of of homemade chicken stock. My searching has brought up some very wide ranging results.

My chicken stock recipe is as plain jane as one might expect. About 1 1/2 gallons water, one 6 pound whole chicken (meat removed and reserved when cooked - bones and parts added back to stock), celery, carrots, onions, bay leaves, thyme, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, and 30 crushed peppercorns. 5 hour simmer. Finished stock is strained, cooled overnight, defatted next day, then frozen in 2 cup portions. Target yield is about 1 gallon, but if I'm off on the simmer the yield can range from a high of 1 1/4 gallons to a low of 3/4 gallon.

What are the best guesstimates on calories per cup for homemade chicken stock?

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Old 03-24-2007, 04:21 PM   #2
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D BlackWell

30 to 40 Cal. per cup
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Old 03-24-2007, 04:22 PM   #3
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I'm with uncleB, about 25-40 calories per cup. I checked my calorie counting site and its around 25.
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Old 03-24-2007, 06:24 PM   #4
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IT epends on how much of the fat in the chicken you are able to remove from the stock. Boiling the stock causes fat to emulsify and disperse into the stock rather than being available to rise to the surface for removal.
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Old 03-24-2007, 06:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
IT epends on how much of the fat in the chicken you are able to remove from the stock. Boiling the stock causes fat to emulsify and disperse into the stock rather than being available to rise to the surface for removal.
That is a magnificent observation.
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Old 03-24-2007, 07:17 PM   #6
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I check it fairly frequently, and try to maintain a low simmer - technically I'd certainly call it boiling, though I'm aiming for a very very low boil, the surface just bubbling a bit, or shimmering on the edge of a light bubbling. After cooling, there is usually about 1/4" - 3/8" of fat to skim. Back in the day, it would be twice that thick, but I can't hardly find good stock chickens anymore. I think the most flavor comes from good old fashioned stew chickens, and of course they have lots more fat also.

How can I guesstimate what amount of fat might be in my stock? It could make a whopping difference in the calorie count. It's my understanding that chicken stock, for caloric purposes, is like highly fortified water. Lots of taste, lots of bulk in the tummy, but extremely low in actual calories. A couple of nice big bowls of stock flavor, and very low in calories - this could be a good tool for me. However, it wouldn't take much fat rendering into the stock to throw my guesstimate way off.
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Old 03-24-2007, 07:52 PM   #7
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D Blackwell...

Is your objective to lose weight?
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Old 03-24-2007, 08:22 PM   #8
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In part. For the purposes of this thread, yes. I'm 40-something and sort of evolving into achieving a healthier state and have, over the last year, been making changes with eating and exercise. I've been gradually upgrading the quality of food (ex junk food junkie - for the most part); and also have been adjusting my 'excercise', increasing my walking (which I love - but have to monitor pace, distance, and frequency very carefully due to bad knees), and added a Yoga based stretching routine.

While I have needed to lose weight, that has not been a focus - I've felt that these other areas were more important, and would offer a base to work from later on - which is now.

Due to my joint issues, aerobic exercise is a problem. I've recently added lap swimming a couple of days a week. Too soon to tell if I will like it and stick to it, but pleased thus far. Now that I've added the aerobic element, I think that this is an excellent time to take hard look at my weight. I really ought to lose about 35 - 40 pounds, which is a lot, but I consider myself extremely lucky compared to many other people, With a modest monthly loss, a year and a half seems a reasonable target to set.
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Old 03-24-2007, 08:53 PM   #9
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If you are just beginning your change of life style might I suggest a visit to your family physician for a check up. He/she can point you in the right direction as to your exercise and diet/weight loss goals.

If you are passed this initial stage, and have been successful in your goals, then congratulations! It can be a challenge. Trust me I know!

As to the exact calorie count in your chicken stock I and others can only guess. There are too many variables envolved. It sounds like a great stock, and if you have been enjoying it, and meeting your goals then I would not be overly concerned. I would just continue to enjoy making it, and the best part eating it!!

Good luck on your travels to better health through proper eating and exercise!! It is a laudable journey!

Enjoy!
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:13 PM   #10
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It's not only the fat trimmed from the chicken that you simmer that adds to calories but skin adds to it as well.

I remove the skin and fat from the chicken prior to simmering it with water. Another sure bet to get rid of all fat without going through the trouble of removing fat and skin is to make the stock (using a washed and cut up chicken - fat, skin and all).

Fish the meat out, strain the stock through a mesh strainer to catch any upleasent bits. Now cover and place the stock in the refrigerator overnight.

All the fat will rise up to the surface, skimm it and you have a virtually fat free chicken stock.
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