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Old 07-05-2005, 11:28 AM   #1
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Charcoal

Since I am contemplating getting a grill as everyone already has one, how are your feelings about charcoal? Is this some kind of health problem from eating things that have been cooked with charcoal. I feel every move one makes you worry that they will say 'no good'. Our family never did cook on a grill and therefore the question. Just as everyone tells me easier to buy frozen than to go through trouble of peeling and preparing which I don't agree with. I think most of you devote an effort otherwise I wouldn't ask. Thanks for all your time. Do appreciate it.

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Old 07-05-2005, 11:40 AM   #2
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I like to use charcoal and wood chips. It gives it the smoked flavor without having to cook on the monster smoker that we have.
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:10 PM   #3
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I like the flavor that the wood chips add and for some reason I can always taste the gas on the gas grill. Weird I know since I have practically no sense of taste left, but I can honestly taste the gas.
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:11 PM   #4
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If we never ate anything that had a research study done on it that said it was bad for us in one way or another - we would all starve to death!

For a charcoal grill - I would use a chimney starter to light the charcoal, instead of using lighter fluid. And, make sure you keep the grill clean - I generally scrub mine with a wire brush after cooking while it's still warm and before I put food on the next time (add the coals, get the grill hot, then brush).

Oh, and nothing wrong with frozen "out of season" vegetables.
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:26 PM   #5
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Charcoal grills pose some health issues. The intense heat of grilling creates carcinogens on meat, and the smoke flavor that we all love is a deposition of smoke particles on the food, again carcinogenic. But the same is tru of cooking with any high-heat source, be it an electric grilling unit, gas grill, a broiler, wood, or even a very hot pan.

Slow cooking on the grill (barbecuing over an indirect heat source, usually hardwood) will minimize the carcinogen production on the food. But I am one who believes implicitly that all fresh foods are healthful, when eaten with wisdom and in moderation.

It seems that we are finding more and more (through scientific study) that the simple rule stated in scripture is absolutely true. Too much of any one food type places stress on the body, be it sugar, meat, vegetable, or mineral.

And again, by eating a moderate amount of a wide variety of foods, we are certain of getting the required nutrients to maintain good health.

Fast food is evil because it is so limiting, and because it contains way too much of food types that should be eaten in moderation, i.e. fat and starch. Though these are essential nutrients, they should be consumed sparingly.

That doesn't mean you can never have a Big Mack; it just means you shouldn't make it your primary meal choice.

And, there are benifits to grilling over charcoal. Because the food is more flavorful, it takes less of it to satisfy you. Also, fat drips from meats and into the fire. You don't injest as much.

For me, a good rule of thumb is that every thing you can think of is a double-edged sword. It has a positive and negative side to it. You just need to know both sides and make your decisions accordingly.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-05-2005, 12:57 PM   #6
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So Fast!

I thank you all for your wisdom and opinions. Never have I gotten answer so quickly to anything. And I mean it. You all have convinced me that it would be something to try once in a lifetime. As you stated, what would we eat if we listened to what they tell us not to eat. Let you know what happens. (Don't hold your breath) My purchases are made slowly.
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Old 07-16-2005, 04:45 PM   #7
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Oh, dear, I guess I'm dead. As Goodweed stated, and he always knows (this isn't sarcasm, he always has stuff researched and can tell you the truth), almost anything you eat can theoretically come up with something that might kill you maybe some day. In fact, I'm 50, and have fewer health problems than anyone I know my age (give or take a decade). My very favorite thing in the world is food cooked on charcoal. Some day I'm sure I'll have cancer ... I don't know too many people over 75 who haven't. But you know what? When I was a kid it was called "Old Age" and people died from it. In reality, cooking over coals is one of the healthiest and most flavorfull way of cooking, and fun to boot! So light up those coals, have your kids (or friends' or sibs' kids) put some marshmallows on the end of skewers, and have a blast.
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Old 07-16-2005, 04:55 PM   #8
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I use a natural charcoal without the fillers. It burns much cleaner and longer with much less ash to remove later. It is also much cheaper and very light weight.

http://www.soundcedar.com/products/v...451e3676536d36
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