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Old 05-31-2006, 11:53 AM   #1
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Diabetes

My 33 year old daughter just came from the doctor, and announced that she has been diagnosed with diabetes.
I've been worried about this possibility for some time. It runs in her dad's family, and she loves sweets and fattening foods. She has let herself go since she had a child, and weighs close to 400 lbs.
I hate the fact that she has diabetes, but I have been worried about her weight for a long time. The doctor has impressed on her the importance of sticking to her diet, so perhaps if she gets some of that weight off, her sugar will go down.

She was quite depressed about the news, moaning about how she's going to miss her sweets, but I promised her I would gather up recipes for some sweets that she could eat.

Sooooo...if any of you all have some yummy recipes for diabetics, I'd appreciate your sharing. I really want to see my little girl all trimmed down and healthy.

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Old 06-01-2006, 01:29 PM   #2
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She can substitute any sugars in cooking with splenda. Her real issue is she needs to control her intake (not just sweets).

I suggest she switch to 6 smaller meals per day, 2-3 hours apart and take 30 min or more walks daily. Her intake should be reduced to have a caloric intake defecit and she will start to drop weight.

Diabetes is all about controlling your blood sugars. If she mixes some fats or proteins with her carbohydrates it will slow down the insulin reponse to those carbohydrates. Have her work with her doctor to design a diet that will work for her.
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Old 06-02-2006, 01:28 AM   #3
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Having been diabetic for about ten years now, I have done considerable research and find that I still know too little. But what I know, I will share.

First, starches are not good. And I can't stress that enough. Carbohydrates of all kinds must be controlled. They are sugars and raise glucose levels in the blood fast and dramatically. But they are also necessary in the diet. large intakes of red meat can increase the risk of developing type-2 diabetes. Soda pop is so full of sugars that a diabetic should abstain completely from regular pop. Carbonated beverages are ok as long as they are carb-free drinks. Too much dietary fat increases triglycerides levels, which create cirulatory problems. Going without food triggers the liver to pump stored glucose (blood sugar) into the blood, again creating problems with blood glucose levels in diabetics. High sugar levels in the blood destroy the cappilaries that nourish every cell and nerve in the body. It is the destruction of those capplary blood vessels that cause nerve damage, diabetic blindness, kidey failure, and can lead to stroke or heart damage or failure. Obesity stresses the body in so many ways and is a factore in the cause of type-2 diabetes. Diabetes is not curable. It is progressive over time. It is controllable.

Now for the good news. Food is not the enemy. Improper food intake and lack of exercise are the enemy. Stay away from all potato products, and highly processed flour and grain products (white flour, white rice, etc) as they are so-called empty calories. That is, they are full of starches, which are turned into sugar and enter the blood stream nearly as quickly as straight table sugar (sucrose). And corn syrup is even worse for your body.

But you can eat sweet potatoes and whole grain prducts as they are rich in the nutrients your body requires. They also contain soluble fiber. Soluble fiber is important for the diabetic in that it slows the absorption of sugar into the blood. This puts less strain on the pancrease (the organ responsible for producing insulin and pumping it inot the blood stream), allowing it to do its job for a longer period of time (adds years to successful dietary control). Eat a wide variety of vegetables, fruits, herbs, grains, and meats. Avoid the high sugar fruits such as grapes, and dried fruits of all kinds. These have concentrated levels of sugar in them. Stay away from fruit juices as again, they have concentrated levels of sugars. Think of it this way, if it takes 5 oranges to produce 8 ounces of orange juice, then by drinking an 8 ounce glass of orange juice, you might as well eat 5 oranges at one sitting. Apple and grape juices are especially high in carbohydrates (sugars).

And move the body. By moving, you force the muscles to use some of that blood sugar, reducing it. You also strengthen the muscle, creating denser muscle mass. And muscle burns far more energy (supplied by metabolising blood sugar) than does any other tissure in the body, except maybe the brain.

Get to know the glycemic index. It will show you how various foods affect your blood sugar levels. You will be surprised what you find you can eat, and what you thought would be good for you that isn't.

I have a brother-in-law and a best freind who didn't control their eating habits. The former lsot his right leg to the knee while the latter has had three heart attacks and is legally blind from diabetes. And both of these men were enourmously strong and in great shape as young men. Myself, I'm in fairly good shape and have lost nothing yet from diabetes. But I take my meds, am active, and watch what I put into my mouth, and how much of it I put there. And I don't eat a boring diet. Anybody who knows me knows that I eat well. But then, I learned to cook well, and so can prepare anything I could want to eat, and still keep it healthy, including deserts, pancakes, lasagna, etc.

It takes some study. But knowledge is the best freind a diabetic can have. There is an avalanch of info on the internet about diabetic menus that include anyting and everything she could ever want. But she'll have to learn to substitue quality food for junk food. Instead of eating a Twinkie, have a great peice of Havarti with a couple strawberries.

It is absolutely essential that she wraps her mind around this concept. If not, her lifespan, and quality of life will be significantly diminished.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-02-2006, 10:56 AM   #4
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Thank you so much for that information, GoodWeed. I'm going to print that off for her. She is a very intelligent young women, and once she faces the facts and gets her mind made up to deal with this disease, I know she'll be OK.
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Old 06-02-2006, 03:19 PM   #5
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Diabetes is not just a disease of high blood sugar. Unfortunately, diabetes brings with it concerns for the entire body. Diabetics have increased risk of heart disease and have the same risk of heart attack as someone who has already suffered a heart attack. The risk of heart disease is 2 to 4 times the risk for a non-diabetic. Diabetics also have increased risk for stroke. In fact, 2 of 3 people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke.

It is very important to restrict the intake of sugar and carbohydrates, but it is equally important to go on a heart healthy diet restricting intake of fat and salt and reducing cholesterol and triglycerides.

I would suggest that your daughter ask her physician to refer her to a registered diatician and send her to diabetes education classes. I would also suggest that you attend a diabetes education class to support and assist her in her managing her disease. Support is very important for diabetics and heart patients since depression is common in patients with those affilictions.

God bless you for wanting to learn what to do to help her. Keeping her motivated to help herself is the best thing you can do.
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Old 06-02-2006, 05:42 PM   #6
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That's a good suggestion, Aurora.
I have a shirtail sorta cousin, very sweet gal, who is the dietician for our local hospital. I believe she holds evening classes for diabetics from time to time, and I'm sure she could also provide my daughter with all sorts of information and recipes.

My daughter is terribly depressed. In one week's time, her beloved grandfather passed, she found out she had diabetes, and then, yesterday, found out that her lifelong best friend had been found beaten and murdered.
If any of you pray, please say one for my Kerrie. She is devastated.
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Old 06-02-2006, 06:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
My 33 year old daughter just came from the doctor, and announced that she has been diagnosed with diabetes.
I've been worried about this possibility for some time. It runs in her dad's family, and she loves sweets and fattening foods. She has let herself go since she had a child, and weighs close to 400 lbs.
I hate the fact that she has diabetes, but I have been worried about her weight for a long time. The doctor has impressed on her the importance of sticking to her diet, so perhaps if she gets some of that weight off, her sugar will go down.

She was quite depressed about the news, moaning about how she's going to miss her sweets, but I promised her I would gather up recipes for some sweets that she could eat.

Sooooo...if any of you all have some yummy recipes for diabetics, I'd appreciate your sharing. I really want to see my little girl all trimmed down and healthy.


OMG!!!

As much as I would hate to say it, she's morbidly obese as well. There are also some cookbooks though out for diabetics. Please try to help her. She'll need all your support, and I truly hope that things work out well for her!

My closest brother was a diabetic. Sadly, he died from the disease. But he was also an alcoholic which partly contributed to his sadly shortened life. And his first wife treated him so badly that it drove him to drink!

He was the opposite of your daughter - he didn't have enough insulin in his pancreas.

I have one of the symptoms of the disease, but haven't been diagnosed with it so far. One of the secs. at the doctor's office told me to just eat one or two pieces of candy when I feel sick and weak.

Yes, the disease also runs in MY family as well. Ever since my brother toild me that he had it, I've been making sure that my blood sugar level is stable.
My oldest brother has been diagnosed with the disease as well.


~Corey123.
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Old 06-02-2006, 10:15 PM   #8
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Constance,

Has your daughter's doctor referred her to a diabetes counselor? That really helped me. My diabetes counselor was very understanding and helpful. Also, I have joined a yahoo group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/diabetes/) which has been helpful. There are other groups too--just go to yahoo groups and type "diabetes" in search. The people who belong to the group are also diabetics (or married to or parent to one), so they know the concerns we have.

Barbara
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Old 06-03-2006, 01:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Get to know the glycemic index. It will show you how various foods affect your blood sugar levels. You will be surprised what you find you can eat, and what you thought would be good for you that isn't.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

http://www.carbs-information.com/gly...food-chart.htm

This page has some of the GI info for many common foods. 100 is sucrose (or is it glucose?) - either way - it's the "standard" by which the GI is set. Higher means a faster insulin response (or at least that's how I understand it). Lower means better, especially in the case of a diabetic watching blood sugar.

Although, I'm not a doctor, so that's just my understanding of it.
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Old 06-03-2006, 04:32 AM   #10
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I do not have diabetes, but I have something called syndrome x which is a pre indicator of diabetes. I developed it while I had encephalitis and my body weight more than doubled and I went from being very very fit to having a body that I am ashamed of. What I do know is that "almost" eliminate the rubbish carbs and eating good ones in moderation, replacing the bulk in my diet which more stuff that I should be eating helps me. I also know that for me exercise is the key. The more I do the better I feel. I have a firend who weighed a similar amount to your daughetr who lost over four stone last year simply by walking for 30 mins twice a day on a treadmill. I find that when my taste buds are givin a break from rubbish they cease to want it even and what I crave most is good food. I also think it is important to cook properly, from scratch and bann all preprepared foods. They hide rubbish in them and the calories you burn cooking from scratch are significantly increased to opening a packet, adding something and applying heat!

I wish your daughter all the luck in the world. I too have been scouring hear for good recipes for me, so she has my sympathy.
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