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Old 09-28-2005, 02:36 PM   #11
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Eggs and health?

I have eaten eggs all my life. As a child I would eat an egg for breakfast more often than not. Now I eat an egg maybe once a week for breakfast - most mornings I eat cereal - and enjoy egg salad sandwiches occasionally for lunch. I add boiled eggs to salads and tuna. I like casseroles with eggs ie. quiches and Spanish tortillas. I believe they have a place in our menus. I have always heard that adults should limit eggs to three a week.

Now my question......... When I was in Mexico I noticed most people did NOT refrigerate eggs in restaurants and in markets. Is that safe? Or does it matter how long they are kept?
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Old 09-28-2005, 02:59 PM   #12
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Eggs age 7 times faster when unrefrigerated. So if they aren't used very quickly, you are flirting with disaster.
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Old 09-28-2005, 03:25 PM   #13
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Scrambled Ostrich Eggs
Serves:10

Ingredients:
milk
salt
pepper
margarine or butter
ostrich egg

Directions:Beat the egg thoroughly. (The beaten egg can be kept in the refrigerator for at least 14 days, make sure to cover the storage container.) Add 3/4 cup of milk to 1 cup of egg. Combine the milk and eggs. Gently stir the mixture. Add salt and pepper to taste. Melt margarine or butter in a heavy skillet or non stick pan. Briskly whisk, pour into the skillet, and turn the heat very low. Gently stir the egg mixture, lifting it up and over from the bottom as it thickens. Continue to stir until the desired texture is achieved. The eggs thicken and dry out very quickly toward the end, so if you like them soft and moist, remove them from the heat a little before they reach the desired texture, they will continue to cook after being removed from the pan.

You may add sautéed green, red and yellow peppers, onions, mushrooms, cheese, chives to the mixture.

*NOTE: You may want to use 1 tablespoon of milk to 1 cup egg. The 3/4 cup milk took too long to cook the egg. Thanks to Denny Seidl for his hint.



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Old 10-01-2005, 10:27 PM   #14
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Eggs are healthy

Eggs are delicious and certainly the protein stops you feeling hungry and having cravings.

They tend to clog me so I always put some LSA on them when I have them.

But I have heard from a couple of nutritionists and dieticians that 2 a day is most likely the most to have and you can have 2 each day of the week.

But unless you have cholesterol or certain health problems you should should maybe consult someone about it.
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Old 12-12-2005, 10:57 AM   #15
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Does anyone know the maximum number of eggs an adult is adivised to eat a week? 2 eggs a week is the recommended amount

I've heard that there is "good cholesterol" and "bad cholesterol". Which is the kind in eggs?Both actually,I read an article that eggs are good for their omega 5 so if you don't eat fish(no idea why not but we are all different) then eat eggs(2 per week though)I prefer to enjoy both.

Does the way an egg is prepared (fried, hard boiled, as an ingredient) matter with regards to its nutritional value?Boiled is highly recommended if you are looking at lowering cholesterol, frying means you just add fat that you don't need, but they are yummy fried really!

Do eggs from free range chickens really make a difference (I'm thinking more health than flavor here)?Free range, apart from looking great(yolks are really yellow not whitish yellow) the are natural which can't be bad for anyone

Does an egg lose much of its nutritional properties as it becomes less fresh (is fresher better for your health, once again overlooking the flavor aspect)?No idea, but my mum taught me to always keep eggs in the fridge to keep them fresh.
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Old 12-12-2005, 11:17 AM   #16
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Sizzles:

You should go back and read all the posts in this thread. I think they will answer your questions.
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Old 12-12-2005, 11:21 AM   #17
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^ Merci Andy M. I really should have done that before posting, but just jumped to the end.
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Old 12-12-2005, 04:02 PM   #18
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I have also read elsewhere that yolk color is not an indicator of nutriitional value, but since the yellow color in the yolks comes from carotenoids (beta-carotene is vitamin A precursor and has antioxidant qualities of it's own), I don't think this is totally accurate. A deeper colored yolk will contain more vitamin A than a yolk of paler color. Chickens fed a diet supplemented with spirulina (about 20 times higher in beta-carotene than carrots) lay eggs with yolks possessing a deep orange color, much deeper than hens who were fed diets containing traditional yolk coloring sources such as marigold, yellow corn, etc.

source:
www.cyanotech.com/pdfs/spbul53.pdf

I've never tried a goose egg Constance, but would love to. I have eaten duck eggs, which are much richer than chicken eggs though.
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