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Old 06-13-2006, 09:27 PM   #21
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First Bolognese we had was in a small pub.

They did not use cream or milk products I am sure.

The first time we made it was from an Australian cookbook that basically says to sautee onions, celery (we would leave that out, but it is your dish), and garlic iin olive oil. Then add ground beef (a bit of added ground pork might work very well), and cook until it changes color a bit but it not very well done. Stir in some undrained crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, oregano, maybe some marjoram, beef stock (or beef base or a bouillon cube with some water), maybe white wine and simmer gently for 1 to 1 and 1/2 hours. Then stir in some shredded fresh basil (can always use dried) and serve.

We have played with similar recipes and generally do not add cream.

Now we just wing it as the mood hits us.

But sorta, kinda prefer it with the white stuff.

But you can make a fine sauce without it.

Can easily leave out the wine for a diabetic diet.

Take care and God bless.
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Old 06-13-2006, 09:33 PM   #22
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I'd only eat it once a day.

The rest would stay in the fridge and I'd warm up some of it as needed.

It's low-fat and low-cal, mainly because I used ground chicken in place of the ground beef, added spices and seasonings a little salt, a touch of oil and instead of heavy cream, I'm using half & half which is lass fattening than heavy cream to keep the same texture and consitancy.

I'm about to put the cream into the sauce and get ready to eat after I check my blood suar level.

I've also sauted the meat with celery, onions and bell pepper to give it tons of flavor, plus I've added low-cal grated cheese to the sauce to make it taste real authentic.

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Old 06-13-2006, 10:12 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
First Bolognese we had was in a small pub.

They did not use cream or milk products I am sure.

The first time we made it was from an Australian cookbook that basically says to sautee onions, celery (we would leave that out, but it is your dish), and garlic iin olive oil. Then add ground beef (a bit of added ground pork might work very well), and cook until it changes color a bit but it not very well done. Stir in some undrained crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, oregano, maybe some marjoram, beef stock (or beef base or a bouillon cube with some water), maybe white wine and simmer gently for 1 to 1 and 1/2 hours. Then stir in some shredded fresh basil (can always use dried) and serve.

We have played with similar recipes and generally do not add cream.

Now we just wing it as the mood hits us.

But sorta, kinda prefer it with the white stuff.

But you can make a fine sauce without it.

Can easily leave out the wine for a diabetic diet.

Take care and God bless.


Thank you!

It's done, came out lovely and it tastes great!! Kind of sweet since it cooked down. I think that's from the tomatoes though.

But in any case, I'm drinking some water to keep it from making my blood sugar level too high. Took the last dose of medicine for the day, now I'm off to bed!


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Old 06-13-2006, 10:19 PM   #24
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Congrats! Nothing like a success in the kitchen to encourage a good night's sleep.
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Old 06-13-2006, 10:32 PM   #25
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Thank you!

Sure makes you feel good knowing that your dish was a success!! Hey, maybe I'll run into you one evening at Franca's!! Thanks again!


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Old 06-13-2006, 10:46 PM   #26
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You're welcome.

I don't get to Waltham much anymore. I used to work there for a number of years so got to know some of the spots.
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Old 06-14-2006, 11:57 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Must be a British interpretation, Jenny. I have NEVER added milk products to a tomato base, unless it's to a tomato soup!

From Marcella Hazan:

"Ragù, as the Bolognese call their celebrated meat sauce, is characterised by a mellow, gentle, comfortable flavour that any cook can achieve by being careful about a few basic points:
The meat should not be from too lean a cut; the more marbled it is, the sweeter will the ragù be. The most desirable cut of beef is the neck portion of the chuck. Add salt immediately when sautéing the meat to extract its juices for the subsequent benefit of the sauce. Cook the meat in milk before adding wine and tomatoes to protect it from the acidic bite of the latter. Do not use a demi-glace or other concentrated brown sauces that up [sic] the balance of flavours toward harshness. Use a pot that retains heat. Earthenware is preferred in Bologna and by most cooks in Emilia-Romagna, but enamelled cast-iron or a pot whose heavy bottom is composed of layers of steel alloys are perfectly satisfactory. Cook, uncovered, at the merest simmer, for a long, long time; no less that 3 hours is necessary, more is better....."

Here is her recipe. It uses milk, not cream. I've made it several times and it is excellent (as is most of her cooking).


Here is an egullet.com discussion of Bolognese sauce, with (supposedly) a recipe M. Batali broguth back from Bologna and claims is original.
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Old 06-14-2006, 01:55 PM   #28
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Thank you for the information, Jennyema. I can't see that adding fats would help improve my sauce, and as I've never added milk, I won't feel the lack of it! Interestingly, I've been on cookery courses in Liguria and Tuscany and although Bologna is a long way away, the Italian cooks never added milk or creamto 'their' versions of a bolognese or ragu sauce... So, looks like lots of us are adapting the Bolognese recipe! I do cook my sauce for at least 3 hours, so that's something I do correctly, according to the quote you posted
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Old 06-14-2006, 04:53 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
T I've been on cookery courses in Liguria and Tuscany and although Bologna is a long way away, the Italian cooks never added milk or creamto 'their' versions of a bolognese or ragu sauce... So, looks like lots of us are adapting the Bolognese recipe! I do cook my sauce for at least 3 hours, so that's something I do correctly, according to the quote you posted
Ishbel my Tuscan husband says thats right, he has never in Tuscany had a Bolognese with cram or milk knowingly, but thinks either would be good.
Next time I have some cream around I might try it, but would not open cream for it especially, especially as my version is very low fat. I use a pinch of sugar or sweetener to temper acidity of tomato. Perhaps, if cream is good a good solution is to use it for special meals, its honestly a great meal without.
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Old 06-14-2006, 08:45 PM   #30
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I've just now discovered that this sauce even tastes good cold!! There is no collagulated fat in it because i used ground chicken beast meat and canola oil,
so you don't get a greasy taste. It's practically fat-free! How's that for a low-cal spaghetti sauce, hey?

It might sound strange to you, but I just had some of the Bolognese sauce with the spaghetti squash cold. And it still tased great! Have I come up with something new? Maybe.

But I think this sauce can be used in a variety of ways, such as a cold or hot dip for nachos, a beanless chili, as well as a topping for tacos!! This could very well be the start of something new here!


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