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Old 10-26-2010, 03:26 PM   #21
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The language of marketing bears no resemblance to actual English usage. Is it right?? NO! But, it still happens, what can we do about it, but point out the incongruities. And then we are told that the language is evolving...devolving is more like it.
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Old 10-26-2010, 03:34 PM   #22
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I love the "sale" signs on the crushed tomatoes 2/$4! They are just $2 each for crying out loud.

I see canned broths priced: "10 for $10.00" or "5 for $5.00". I think they're trying to get you to buy those quantities.
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Old 10-26-2010, 04:16 PM   #23
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I see canned broths priced: "10 for $10.00" or "5 for $5.00". I think they're trying to get you to buy those quantities.
That's exactly right! I highly recommend the book What To Eat by Marion Nestle. It's a big book but so worth it. It guides you through each section of the average grocery store and has lots of "insider information" on the politics behind marketing food along with general guidelines for determining the quality of different foods. It encourages the reader to shop the store's peripheral sections (i.e. dairy, produce, bakery, etc.).
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Old 10-26-2010, 04:20 PM   #24
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I see canned broths priced: "10 for $10.00" or "5 for $5.00". I think they're trying to get you to buy those quantities.

and it works!
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Old 10-26-2010, 06:36 PM   #25
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There are some really interesting and enlightening comments here.
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Old 10-26-2010, 08:13 PM   #26
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I see canned broths priced: "10 for $10.00" or "5 for $5.00". I think they're trying to get you to buy those quantities.
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and it works!
Yes it does work. Like my dad said, people don't want to be limited. Someone may go to the store intending to buy 3 cans of corn, but when they see that it is 5 for $5, or that it is 30 cents off--limit 5, they will usually buy the limit. Kind of like saying something is $9.99 rather than $10.00. At a glance, it looks like much less to many people.

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Old 10-27-2010, 09:38 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by snickerdoodle View Post
That's exactly right! I highly recommend the book What To Eat by Marion Nestle. It's a big book but so worth it. It guides you through each section of the average grocery store and has lots of "insider information" on the politics behind marketing food along with general guidelines for determining the quality of different foods. It encourages the reader to shop the store's peripheral sections (i.e. dairy, produce, bakery, etc.).
Ditto on that, Snickerdoodle.

and you don't have to read the w hole book at once. It's gotSO much information I think everyone should have, especially folks who are raising (or who hope to raise) healthy children.
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Old 12-03-2010, 09:30 AM   #28
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I am also someone who doesn't particularly look for organic... I think mostly because the term "organic" has become so adulterated, there's a whole list of chemicals that are OK to use and still call yourself organic. it's ridiculous.

So... I also go the local food route. In fact, I just put a year's worth of grassfed local beef in the freezer. It's better quality than anything I'd buy in the store, tastes great, and I know my beef had a nice life.

I've also taken the step and raised, butchered, and processed meat chickens with my mother this summer. Quite the enlightening experience - I almost want to say that if anyone wants to eat meat, they should be willing to do the dirty work themselves.

This may earn me a few flames and I realize it's my first post, but after I did my own chicken processing, it gave me a tremendous appreciation for the life of that bird and the sacrifice it made for me. Most people eat meat without even considering that it was a life once, are wasteful with it, etc. Raising and processing those chickens really gave me new perspective and made me much more grateful to have the meat and also less inclined to waste any of it.

I remembered how the Native Americans used to always thank their food for the sacrifice they had made, and so I did that as well. They also did their best to use ALL of it, and not to waste any part. This might sound kind of weird, but we really need to honor that sacrifice, and I think it is disrespectful to an animal that gave its life so you can eat, if you are wasteful with it or don't even acknowledge that it was a life.

OK so I totally derailed a bit... lol. sorry!
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Old 12-03-2010, 11:41 AM   #29
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Don't be sorry. Being able to express your feelings freely is one of the things that make DC so special. You'll find many who agree with you and give you positive feedback, and the ones that don't agree will express themselves, but tactfully, so it's positive feedback too.

Personally, I thank the being that provides my nourishment and all the people from farm to my plate.
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Old 12-03-2010, 12:22 PM   #30
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I am also someone who doesn't particularly look for organic... I think mostly because the term "organic" has become so adulterated, there's a whole list of chemicals that are OK to use and still call yourself organic. it's ridiculous.

So... I also go the local food route. In fact, I just put a year's worth of grassfed local beef in the freezer. It's better quality than anything I'd buy in the store, tastes great, and I know my beef had a nice life.

I've also taken the step and raised, butchered, and processed meat chickens with my mother this summer. Quite the enlightening experience - I almost want to say that if anyone wants to eat meat, they should be willing to do the dirty work themselves.

This may earn me a few flames and I realize it's my first post, but after I did my own chicken processing, it gave me a tremendous appreciation for the life of that bird and the sacrifice it made for me. Most people eat meat without even considering that it was a life once, are wasteful with it, etc. Raising and processing those chickens really gave me new perspective and made me much more grateful to have the meat and also less inclined to waste any of it.

I remembered how the Native Americans used to always thank their food for the sacrifice they had made, and so I did that as well. They also did their best to use ALL of it, and not to waste any part. This might sound kind of weird, but we really need to honor that sacrifice, and I think it is disrespectful to an animal that gave its life so you can eat, if you are wasteful with it or don't even acknowledge that it was a life.

OK so I totally derailed a bit... lol. sorry!
I for one, want to thank you for such a well thought out post, Anna.
Lots of food for thought there. I've been blessing my food since childhood, and it gives me a reminder of the real reason for what sometimes is just a habit. Very nice post indeed.
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