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Old 10-18-2012, 10:02 PM   #11
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Thanksgiving - healthy eating

Yes yes I do agree that Thanksgiving you should indulge. Haha I am not arguing with anyone on that.

I feel as though a lot of you had some really good ideas and thanks for sharing!

Also since I am deep frying a turkey, just curious, have any of you tried deep fried turkey before?

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Old 10-18-2012, 10:41 PM   #12
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My sister brought a fryer to my house a couple years ago. The turkey was good. I didn't want to miss the smell of turkey cooking and homemade gravy, so I cooked a breast in the house to have for leftovers.

Lots of people like this method, but for me it's too messy and expensive, but my sis and her husband feel that it's worth it.
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Old 10-18-2012, 10:44 PM   #13
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I live in an apartment, there is no place for me to deep fry a turkey.
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Old 10-19-2012, 01:23 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by DeepFryaTurkey View Post
Healthy Ideas For Thanksgiving - Any good ideas to go along with Thanksgiving dinner?
Roasted Butternut Squash Halves with Cranberry Apple Stuffing or Spinach-Gruyere-Walnut stuffing. Makes a great vegetarian entree substitute for turkey.
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Old 10-19-2012, 01:52 AM   #15
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Serve some healthy nibbles before the main meal. People tend to eat less when they're not starving when dinner arrives.
Something like veggies or rye crackers with hummus, guacamole, salsa etc or healthy light soup as a starter. Maybe even a light salad.
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Old 10-19-2012, 08:57 AM   #16
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No interest at all in frying a turkey
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:54 AM   #17
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Pay attention to the salad dressings as well. I am guessing that the salad dressing that I use on my salads has more calories than the salad itself. Also read into some recipes used in asian cooking to see what spices they use. I find that a lost of North Americans only have two kinds of tastes - sweet and salty. How about a beet salad with a mostly vinegar dressing? The people from India and Thailand use cinamon to season some veggies... but curry powder/sauce is much too overwhelming to use on a tday. Also vary the texture of the meal. Add nuts to salads - yes, they are rather calorie dense but they, for the most part, are reasonably good calories.

Jello parfait for dessert? or even as a side dish? Provide an assortment of breads...this will keep people from eating a lot of the "unhealthy" foods because they will want to sample a little of everything.

If you provide people with a variety of new tastes or textures they will usually eat more slowly to evaluate the new tastes and textures, and as a result will eat less food.

Maybe also you can try making pumpkin pie with yougurt?
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Old 10-29-2012, 12:11 PM   #18
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It seems odd to me that so many people equate "tasty" with "not healthy". We eat a lot of healthy meals at our house that are both tasty and that would be right at home on the table for a holiday meal.

Thanksgiving centers around many foods that are considered healthy by nature: turkey, cranberries, sweet potatoes, green beans. Nothing wrong with these foods. It's usually things like gravy and dressing that sabotage a diet. I cooked T-Day dinner last year, so what I did is keep some of the healthier foods simple and less heavy by leaving out or reducing the fat and sugar (I really don't like heavy foods anyway) and focusing on the seasonings. But I still made the gravy and dressing, for those who like that sort of thing. I thought it was pretty well balanced and didn't hear a single complaint about the meal. One tip: if you make a healthy meal, don't announce to people that it's healthy; that only seems to set an expectation that it will somehow be disappointing.

Also, eating healthy doesn't necessarily mean that you must completely avoid desserts. I love desserts, though I tend to take a smaller slice of pie and don't plop a big gob of whipped cream on top.

For me, there's nothing worse than eating an enormous meal and then feeling bloated and crappy for the rest of the day. That's more like punishment than pleasure. I'd rather savor smaller amounts of a few delicious things and save a little room for dessert.
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Old 10-29-2012, 03:56 PM   #19
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I naturally steer toward the healthier foods, as I love them anyways, not just for thanksgiving. I love sweet potatoes, rutabaga, cranberry sauce (home made is preferred), celery, black olives, etc. I limit my mashed potatoes and gravy. If I have a weakness, it's for bread dressing. I love the stuff, but eat small amounts over several days. I do love pies, and usually we have both apple and pumpkin. Again, I take very small slices. I used to stuff myself, but gave that up as being counter-productive to enjoyment. Steve, you are right on the money with that one.

My egg-nog is home made, with egg and milk, stevia, nutmeg, and vanilla. I don't use heavy cream to thicken it. Egg yolks do the trick. You just have to add the hot milk to the yolk to temper it, then add it back into the already flavored milk, both to thicken, and add flavor. And yes, I know about the cholesterol and fat in the egg yolk. But I only have this drink twice a year, and only make enough for the meal, not to last three days. I can indulge in a little egg nog.

But Steve is right. Healthy need not be boring. Herbs, spices, and properly prepared foods will make everything sumptuous.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 10-29-2012, 04:34 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
It seems odd to me that so many people equate "tasty" with "not healthy". We eat a lot of healthy meals at our house that are both tasty and that would be right at home on the table for a holiday meal.

Thanksgiving centers around many foods that are considered healthy by nature: turkey, cranberries, sweet potatoes, green beans. Nothing wrong with these foods. It's usually things like gravy and dressing that sabotage a diet. I cooked T-Day dinner last year, so what I did is keep some of the healthier foods simple and less heavy by leaving out or reducing the fat and sugar (I really don't like heavy foods anyway) and focusing on the seasonings. But I still made the gravy and dressing, for those who like that sort of thing. I thought it was pretty well balanced and didn't hear a single complaint about the meal. One tip: if you make a healthy meal, don't announce to people that it's healthy; that only seems to set an expectation that it will somehow be disappointing.

Also, eating healthy doesn't necessarily mean that you must completely avoid desserts. I love desserts, though I tend to take a smaller slice of pie and don't plop a big gob of whipped cream on top.

For me, there's nothing worse than eating an enormous meal and then feeling bloated and crappy for the rest of the day. That's more like punishment than pleasure. I'd rather savor smaller amounts of a few delicious things and save a little room for dessert.
I'll take Steve's extra whipped cream - as long as it's not Cool Whip (ick).

When everyone leaves, I go in the kitchen and squeeze the aerosol nozzle in my mouth. Ssshhh.
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