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Old 04-25-2006, 09:58 PM   #1
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Healthy shopping list

when you go to the supermarket, and you know your eating healthy for the week or whatever, what does your shopping list look like. i am trying to make one of my own, but can use some help.

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Old 04-25-2006, 10:11 PM   #2
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I look for fresh and durable. I love dark leafy greens (collards kale spinach etc) I also like the floavorings from roots and bulbs, onions garlic shallot. In a stew or soup cauliflower and turnips make healthy alternatives to potatoes, and they cook easily and take up the stew flavors readily. I also get lettuces, carrots, celery, raddishes etc for salads and munching. Peppers are full of Vit C, and I also look for seasonals asparagus? corn? mellons? fruits??

I look for hard flavorable cheeses of which I can have a little and be satisfied. I look for lean meats, but I also flavor my dark greens with smokey bacon or turkey. All kinds of tomato product, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, dried beans, barley, Irish oats, low salt/fat broths. Chicken sausages...there are some great ones out there! skim milk, low fat yogurt (make yogurt cheese with a stainer or cheese cloth) Dark whole grain breads.

I make my own soups most of the time, and try to use all I buy...stale bread becomes crumbs etc...Old greens perk up in soups,
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:41 AM   #3
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get yourself veggies (potatoes & squash, peas & corn are very starchy yet are great for fiber), legumes (if you buy canned ones, put 'em in a strainer & rinse them), you may want dried splitpeas &/or lentils for soups, yogurt, skim mozzarella & ricotta, whole almonds to roast w/ garlic, seasalt, sage, pepper & oliveoil, fish such as tilapia or flounder, codfish, salmon (plenty of omega in some fishes), eggbeaters or you may get regular eggs & discard your yolks for omelets with veggies, lower fat poultry items, breads with whole grains ,flaxseed for fiber that you may wanna have with your cereal. many brands offer lower-calorie items.
fruit is great for you.
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Old 04-26-2006, 01:59 AM   #4
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I usually get a lot of what is listed on the World's Healthiest Foods website. (that website is great for recipes too, by the way)

I usually try to eat fairly healthy so my list will often include many of those foods. (fish, fresh veggies and fruits, high quality grains, legumes, etc.)
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:03 AM   #5
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A good rule of thumb is to concentrate on making your purchases from the items sold from the perimeter walls of the grocery store, where you usually find dairy, produce, meats, breads, in other words, real food. The interior isles will contain the pre-packaged foods and you want to stay away from pre-packaged foods. The exception to this rule is you will find things like oats, dried beans, flour, baking essentials, in the interior isles. Remember, if junk does not make it into your grocery cart, you can not be tempted by it in your house.
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Old 04-26-2006, 09:40 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
A good rule of thumb is to concentrate on making your purchases from the items sold from the perimeter walls of the grocery store, where you usually find dairy, produce, meats, breads, in other words, real food. The interior isles will contain the pre-packaged foods and you want to stay away from pre-packaged foods. The exception to this rule is you will find things like oats, dried beans, flour, baking essentials, in the interior isles. Remember, if junk does not make it into your grocery cart, you can not be tempted by it in your house.
At the beginning of the store where I do most of the shopping, the produce department is first. After I have bought what I want from the produce, the basket is already full. Do any of you experience the same thing? During the course of shopping, have to rearrange everything so things don't get mashed. Do not want to suggest store getting bigger carts; spend enough already.
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:06 PM   #7
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Yes I do ITK, specially at a store like whole foods where the produce is sooo fine and fresh and handled with care...When I cook, the meat is essential but not the bulk item...4 oz or less per person. THis means I treat my veggies seriously and with care for great texture color and flavor.
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Old 04-26-2006, 12:40 PM   #8
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Yeh Yeh

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
Yes I do ITK, specially at a store like whole foods where the produce is sooo fine and fresh and handled with care...When I cook, the meat is essential but not the bulk item...4 oz or less per person. THis means I treat my veggies seriously and with care for great texture color and flavor.
Yeh, for Whole Foods!!!!! Good thing you get to go there. I really feel like I am so privileged to be able to shop at store like it and then to see how many people are in there. It makes me so grateful to know others are conscious of their health too. I often see lot of well known people in there, like people who are on tv, mayor, senator, etc. I surely don't bother them when they are shopping. they are entitled to their privacy too. You just can't find place where the produce looks like picture and t astes just as good. Not to mention the meat department. I am sure they pride themselves on consumer appeal. Good for you Robo410 you are giving yourself the BEST. You can't buy your health so next best thing is to protect what you have.
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Old 04-26-2006, 01:03 PM   #9
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My creed to healthy eating is DIVERSITY AND MODERATION. Period. Simple. No brain surgery required.

In my case, I make up a complete menu every week on the computer along with the grocery list, always leaving room for that unexpected "special" I might find.

My husband doesn't eat any red meat or red meat products, so I devise our weekly menus around vegetarian, poultry, & seafood - usually planning on 2 dishes of each type, but using different ethnic recipes.

Asian, Indian, Italian play the largest parts of our menus. I also love roasting on our indoor rotisserie, so roasted poultry is utilized as well. And soups - I always try to do one homemade soup per week.

To answer your question directly, you can't just "make up your shopping list" because you're trying to eat healthy. You need to decide what you're going to make every day & work from there.
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Old 05-13-2006, 01:14 PM   #10
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I make up my list based on 1-3 major meals -- one will be a great weekend meal, quite often shared with friends. Another might be a stew or soup or specific kind of salad (now that summer is coming up, salad nicoise is a favorite). Then I just fill in the gaps in the pantry, and fill my fridge crisper drawers with tons of fruit and veggies. It always amazes me that I know people who couldn't live out of their pantry/fridge for more than a couple of days .... I could for months, and the space isn't much (a regular sized cupboard, a 70s style fridge/freezer combo). I go to the grocery store once a week, and always buy a heaping basket full. Freezer always has at least two bags of good quality frozen veggies so I can grab a hand full whenever needed. There are always at least three kinds of greens in the crisper drawers (a cabbage, a head of iceberg, and some kind of loose greens -- sometimes spinach, a baby lettuce mix, etc). There are always green onions, round onions, and garlic. The pantry always has a lot of grains and legumes.
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