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Old 08-18-2011, 01:04 PM   #21
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There are lots of misconceptions out there about "Organic" and what pesticides do or do not do.

1. Pesticides are ON produce, not IN it. If washed carefully, all of it can be washed away.

2. Processed foods...who knows whats in it? That 10 thousand gallon vat might have Aunt Molly floating in it. Who would know? A few rats, a million cockroaches....ANYTHING can be in that can of whatever you open, INCLUDING pesticides that weren't washed from the produce they were made of.

3. No pesticides are IN the vegetable matter itself. Plants simply do not have any way to absorb them. As said above, they are ON the plant and can be washed off fresh produce.

4. Organically grown veggies are great. "Feed the soil" is exactly what it does. However, remember that even organic soil can be adjusted to a not-so-good level of microbial activity, and you better believe the commercial growers know how to limit organic additives to save money.

5. Hydroponically grown veggies can have or exceed organically grown veggies in nutrient values if the hydroponic nutrients are maxed out to what each veggie can absorb. The average produce in the store in the USA has FDA controlled amounts of nutrients. Organic produce can only match hydroponically maxed out produce if the organics are also maxed out globally.

For example; The FDA requires that one pound of tomatoes has a MINIMUM of 400 units of vitamin "A". This amount can be carefully maintained by commercial growers by putting "X" amount of fertilizers on the crops; per/acre; no more, no less. The gallon per/minute rate of release onto the produce ensures that it will have almost exactly 400 units of vitamin "A" per/pound of tomatoes.

Each other type of veggie has it's set requirements of nutrients per/pound. That requirement is set by the FDA in the USA. I have no idea what other countries do.

Here's the clincher; in hydroponic veggie growing, you can max out what is the well known maximum nutrients that each specific type of veggie can absorb. By doing so, you can max out the vitamins in that produce.

As per/the above; Hydroponically grown tomatoes, if maxed out with nutrients, can have 4 THOUSAND units of vitamin "A" per/pound. Ten times what the FDA requires and commercial farmers fertilize for in soil grown produce.

Note: I am a hydroponic scientist. I've studied hydroponic farming for more than 30 years. I've used it for as long. If you wish more information about growing hydroponic veggies yourself, you're welcome to visit, join and participate on my hydroponic vegetable site. Just as with this site, you have to join to ask questions, but I can guarantee you won't ask me anything I can't answer about hydroponic gardening. The site is also "G" rated, just like this one!
Come say Hi to me...I'm "Hydro-1" on my site.

Note Note: Mods, if my last paragraph is deemed "spam" for my site, please feel free to edit it out. (I hope not, I need the traffic...)
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Old 08-18-2011, 01:36 PM   #22
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The first post on the board about organic food. Really common, sounds more like propaganda rather than an opinion. I think post like this though are harmless should not be allowed. Just like you cannot come here try to cell something, I think you should not come to try to sell an idea either. of course this is up for our moderators.

But in reality, for every positive research about organic, there is onother one that says that there are no benefits. I say if you can afford it and you know what you are buying go for it. One thing for sur eit cannot be bad for you.
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Old 08-18-2011, 01:42 PM   #23
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I've never been what you'd call a "tree hugger" or anything like that, but I have definitely jumped on the healthy eating bandwagon. There's certainly nothing wrong with making profit and I don't begrudge anyone from doing it. Furthermore, I don't believe that large agribusinesses are out to intentionally make us sick. That would be kind of a stupid business plan. But I do believe that new technologies, GMOs, herbicides, fungicides, etc are often too quickly given a green light before the proper research has been done. It's all in the name of producing a lot of cheap food for the masses. And many of the employees of big agribusiness have the ear of big government. When those two entities get together, it's a lose-lose situation.

I honestly feel that with food, like anything else, you get what you pay for. Happy Meals are certainly cheap, but they are also devoid of nutrients and, long term, come with a high price to your health. Many of the chronic illnesses, such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes could likely be avoided by simply investing more in better quality food.

I try to shop at farm markets whenever possible. Where else can you look the grower in the eye and ask questions about your food? I also shop at co-op markets that I trust, preferably local co-ops and not the national chains. In addition, I have become an avid label reader. I try to buy foods that are minimally processed and contain only pronounceable ingredients. I have also become a fan of grass-fed beef and free range chickens. We always used to eat that kind of meat when I was a kid. I guess like a lot of Americans, I had forgotten how good it can taste. I haven't done the CSA thing yet, but am considering it for next year.

In the words of Michael Pollan, "Eat [real] food. Not a lot. Mostly plants." Words to live by.
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Old 08-18-2011, 02:43 PM   #24
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Sorry, my last post was kind of rambling. The point I was really trying to make is that there are many ways to eat better and healthier. Organic is only one of those ways.
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Old 08-18-2011, 03:53 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll
It's all in the name of producing a lot of cheap food for the masses. And many of the employees of big agribusiness have the ear of big government. When those two entities get together, it's a lose-lose situation.
Cheap food... Where?? Food is higher now than at any other time...in my life anyway. ~~ All the "talk" is/driving up prices...Check the prices on Corn & Soybeans....
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:20 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Cheap food... Where?? Food is higher now than at any other time...in my life anyway. ~~ All the "talk" is/driving up prices...Check the prices on Corn & Soybeans....
Well, let's see. Corn, as of yesterday, was about $7.80/bushel. That's about 56 POUNDS of shelled corn. Soybeans are about 14 bucks for 60 pounds.

Granted, prices are going up, but yes, I would still call that cheap. At least compared to the price I pay at the farm stand for, say, tomatoes, which are $1 each, but vastly superior to any of the mass produced tomatoes found in the supermarket.

Just to put things in perspective, in 1930, the average American spent 24.2% of their disposable income on food. Today it's about 10%.
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:21 PM   #27
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Regardless of some of the pros & cons cited above, one of the big drivers of "organic" early on was a means for small producers to differentiate their product from large producers and thereby compete, i.e., it was a marketing device.

Of course, as the bigs have jumped on the organic bandwagon, that differentiation is lost.
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:31 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Well, let's see. Corn, as of yesterday, was about $7.80/bushel. That's about 56 POUNDS of shelled corn. Soybeans are about 14 bucks for 60 pounds.

Granted, prices are going up, but yes, I would still call that cheap. At least compared to the price I pay at the farm stand for, say, tomatoes, which are $1 each, but vastly superior to any of the mass produced tomatoes found in the supermarket.
So you are enjoying cheap beef, pork, chicken, eggs, milk, and I could go on ad nauseum with other products... due to the "cheap" price of corn, and soybeans??? Where do you shop???
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:38 PM   #29
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So you are enjoying cheap beef, pork, chicken, eggs, milk, and I could go on ad nauseum with other products... due to the "cheap" price of corn, and soybeans??? Where do you shop???
You're completely missing my point.

What I am saying is exactly the opposite. Cheap food (i.e. government subsidized corn, soybeans) is used to manufacture some of the most unhealthy products out there. I am not a fan of cheap food. I'd rather pay more for better quality food.

And as far as where I shop, I specifically mentioned those places.
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:53 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll
I'd rather pay more for better quality food.
Then you should be happy, and should remain so as grain futures steadily rise....pushing food prices higher and higher.....Whether it is "cheap food" or "better quality" food you seek........

Bon Appetit
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