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Old 03-04-2015, 01:40 PM   #41
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I know Kathleen mentioned this earlier somewhere but I have been working on my Parmesan crisps. Heres the basic deal. You need a silicon baking mat and a flatish pan (I use a half sheet jelly roll pan).

Put some of the cheese (I have been using that thin shredded stuff from BJs) on the mat. Pat it so it spreads. Ideally you would have no gaps and only a shred thick. You won't hit the ideal but strive for it. Too thick isn't good and too thin means it just shatters and crumbles.

I start the oven at 350F while getting the cheese spread out. Once you have the mat mostly covered stick it in the oven. At about 10 minutes I rotate since our oven is defiantly hotter in the back (left) corner. At about 20 minutes they are done. You want a uniform dull golden brown color. The top really shouldn't look wet.

Pull the pan out of the oven and let it be for 10 minutes or so. Then I just fold in half to break em in two. Store in the fridge in a bag.

The first few batches I made were good, but they didn't get crispy enough, then I made a batch and forgot about them for a but and they ended up at 20ish minutes.

These are a good cracker sub except they don't tolerate getting wet. Moist things (like the salmon dip) are fine, but they won't stay as sturdy as a saltine in soup for instance.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:59 PM   #42
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I do something very similar, except I just put little piles of parmesan onto parchment paper and nuke for 1 minute. After you let them cool for a minute or two they crunch up perfectly and peel right off the parchment paper. It's my favorite night-time treat!
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:59 PM   #43
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You...put...them ...in...the...fridge...? Mine don't last that long.
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:04 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
You...put...them ...in...the...fridge...? Mine don't last that long.

Make extra
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:19 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
Make extra
Mine, all mine!!!
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:30 PM   #46
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Just wanted to add that this isn't just for parmesan. Other grated cheeses work the same way though you may need to adjust the cooking time a bit to get them just right.
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Old 03-07-2015, 11:15 AM   #47
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I made up a batch of keto pancakes for breakfast this morning using Maria Emmerich's recipe (found here) and topped with Mrs. Butterworth's sugar free syrup. They were pretty good, but it was a bit of a trick to find the right temperature for frying them. Too high and they would burn before they were done. Too low and they never browned. I found a happy spot at medium low, which simply wouldn't work for traditional pancakes.

I might have to play with this recipe a bit. I used coconut flour, but next time I think I'll try almond flour instead. I also like my pancakes with more "tang." It might be worth experimenting with sour cream or yogurt as an ingredient.

I thought they looked and tasted pretty good, though.

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Old 03-07-2015, 11:45 AM   #48
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Those look good Steve.

I did break down and buy some Xanthan Gum (EXPENSIVE) to use for slight thickening. It does wonders for a light thicken (jelling) of soy sauce based sauce in place of cornstarch. I used about a quarter teaspoon for about a quart of soup.
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:03 PM   #49
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I have xanthan gum here, too, and have used it from time to time. But I've found that I get the most thickening bang from konjac root flour (also known as glucomannan).

It's tricky stuff to use, however. You have to add it ahead of time to whatever you want to thicken and then let it sit for 10-15 minutes to swell. It's kind of a guess as to how much to use because it's a very powerful thickener. The first time I made soup with it, I added a teaspoon to a cup of stock. Nothing. So I added another teaspoon and then another. Well, after sitting for several minutes it literally turned that cup of stock into chicken flavored jell-o.

So now what I do is make up a thick base of water (or stock) and konjac. Then I spoon that into whatever I'm thickening until the consistency is right.

Konjac also has the unique property of binding to glucose in food so that it can't be absorbed by your body. Good for people like us who don't tolerate it well.
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Old 03-07-2015, 01:57 PM   #50
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Konjac is the next paycheck experiment. The Xanthan was over $25 a pound, I only got 0.2 lb for about $5. At least I remembered that you only needed to use a little.

I do miss gravy. Did you ever try the Almond flour as a thickener, like in a roux?
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