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Old 03-30-2017, 04:51 PM   #11
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Gotgarlic: sometimes it hard to translate from Swedish to English. It more about the length of the fibers, for example, rhubarb have long fibers while banana has short.
It doesn't quite work that way. You can cut rhubarb into small pieces, but it's still a high fiber food - insoluble fiber - that can cause a blockage, because as the food travels through the intestine, it can become a mass that can't get through the narrowed area of the intestine. Bananas contain a lot of sugar but not a lot of soluble fiber, so more of it is broken down and absorbed in the small intestine and doesn't make it to the large intestine, which is typically where the strictures occur. It's pretty liquid when it gets to the large intestine.
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Old 03-30-2017, 08:25 PM   #12
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Andy, your daughter's friend may want to ask her doctor for a referral to a registered dietician who can tailor a diet to her specific needs.
^^^^^^^ This!

This seems like one of those times that an internet forum isn't the best place to get answers. It sounds like there are a whole lot of variables.

CD
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Old 03-30-2017, 09:22 PM   #13
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^^^^^^^ This!

This seems like one of those times that an internet forum isn't the best place to get answers. It sounds like there are a whole lot of variables.

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My sentiments exactly. I am very hesitant to offer any medical advice to anyone. Specially on the internet. And then this is fourth person advice. From Andy's daughter's friend to the daughter to Andy and now members of the forum. I am sure Andy meant well, but Crohn's Disease is a very complicated illness. As we have all seen here.

Andy's daughters' friend needs to see a registered licensed dietician or a licensed medical practitioner.
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:18 PM   #14
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A** Which site? I would restrict a search to only university sites, or the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.

B** Gluten has nothing to do with Crohn's disease. Celiac disease is a separate illness with similar symptoms where the patients have an autoimmune inflammatory response to gluten, but Crohn's is different.

C** Here's some good information: https://www.ibdrelief.com/diet/role-...p-diet-and-ibd
A** I agree 100%. University sites are good and so are 'registered' sites for specific diseases. (eg. Duke/John Hopkins)

B** Although I agree 'in principle' (per se) I personally know several people who have Crohn's and all of them are sensitive to Gluten. So although it may be considered a 'popular misconception' that there is an automatic link between the two, the frequency with which it happens cannot be ruled out. AND I also know several people who have IBS - and with all of them gluten is also on their list.

C** And is this a registered site? or a University associated site?
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:23 PM   #15
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Andy, your daughter's friend may want to ask her doctor for a referral to a registered dietician who can tailor a diet to her specific needs.
Spot on GG! Andy that is your best response to your daughter.

I understand that her friend is suffering and just reaching out to whatever she can grab but

your best advice to both your daughter and to her

is for her to talk some more with her doctor and give her a hug and encouragement.
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Old 03-31-2017, 01:35 AM   #16
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GotGarlic; as I said it hard to translate between Swedish and english and you got what I meant.
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Old 03-31-2017, 08:28 AM   #17
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A** I agree 100%. University sites are good and so are 'registered' sites for specific diseases. (eg. Duke/John Hopkins)
Duke and Johns Hopkins are both universities. I don't know what you mean by "registered."

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B** Although I agree 'in principle' (per se) I personally know several people who have Crohn's and all of them are sensitive to Gluten. So although it may be considered a 'popular misconception' that there is an automatic link between the two, the frequency with which it happens cannot be ruled out. AND I also know several people who have IBS - and with all of them gluten is also on their list.
It most certainly can be ruled out that there is an automatic link. Your personal experience is just that. My personal experience contradicts it. And gastroenterologists who see many patients every day and perform research involving many more surely know more than you do about how often these issues occur together.

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C** And is this a registered site? or a University associated site?
No, although it comports with what my doctors have taught me over the years. I actually can't find any studies on FODMAPs and Crohn's disease. I think it's probably because, as I said earlier, people with more severe cases of Crohn's are generally not encouraged to restrict food unnecessarily because it's difficult enough to get sufficient nutrition.

Andy, is it possible you confused IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's and colitis)? A low FODMAP diet has been shown to help IBS but not IBD.
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Old 03-31-2017, 10:18 AM   #18
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Thank you all for your contributions. I'll pass your suggestions and references along to my daughter.
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