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Old 03-02-2007, 10:06 PM   #31
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Corey,Im curious how is poverty a disease?
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Old 03-02-2007, 10:17 PM   #32
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It depends on how you look at it. Just in mental terms maybe.

It is sometimes paired with alcoholism and drug addiction. Or just a person falling on exremely hard times like in the movie and being forced to live out in the streets or subway.

What would you call it? A disadvantage, maybe?
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Old 03-02-2007, 10:26 PM   #33
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If poverty is a disease then we are one sick nation! Poverty is circumstance, struggle and sacrifice.
It takes a lot to get on your feet and become poor!
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Old 03-03-2007, 01:51 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
I remember when I was a kid and working in grocery stores after school and during the summer.

I did the lousy jobs, for example, cleaning up the garbage room that was filled with rats. When you went in you turned on the light and they scattered. You waited a few seconds before entering further to make sure they were gone.

The worst task was cleaning the worms (? maggots, anyway they looked like them) off the potatoes and saving those spuds that looked OK to be put back for sale.

One of my jobs was to put out in the trash the food that had to be tossed, and the store did not relegate items to the dumpster easily.

We had a routine and the very poorest folks in the area knew when we did it.

Some of the people working in the store would try to destroy the stuff before putting it outside. They would berate the folks waiting outside, big shots they thought they were.

They had a job. Little did they know how close to the people standing outside they were.

I always put the stuff out in a way they could take the edible parts (although I learned later that all of it was considered edible). They were all old, probably a lot younger than I am today, but clearly needy.

If someone wants to learn about needy would suggest reading Jack London's 'People of the Abyss'. Just Google and you can read it on the web for no cost (there are many books that are out of copyrite one can read that way).

If I have a point, and I guess I must have one, it is that there are many folks who are in true poverty, not the dude who scribed those 'tips'. To him it was self imposed.

And we, for several years, lived not too far from that, but never had to miss a meal.

But many folks still have to.

So I choose to direct my charity to those who truly need it, today's people in the abyss.

Sorry about the rant, just had to do it.

Your post reminded me of an experience that happened about five years ago.
We had a camping trip planned and my family was supposed to bring the eggs. There were several families and we needed eight dozen eggs for the weekend camp out.
When I went to the store, I realized that eggs were on sale 2/$1 (no limit).
I purchased 14 dozen (6 dzn for home). I went to the check out and there was a couple (man & woman) being checked out. They had bought the frozen pizza special 5/$10 (no limit) and were paying for about 20 pizzas. Then they were gone. The cashier was nice and put 2 dzn eggs to a bag for me. After packing the eggs in the car, I drove home.
The dogs got to barking and when I looked out my window, I noticed a car parked along side the curb with somebody sitting inside. When the dogs started barking again, I looked out and a man had left the car and was throwing away a drink cup in a neighbor's trash can.
He was the man who had checked out in front of me with the pizzas and the other person in the car was the woman. They had followed me home.
I called the police and they came out. They arrested the couple who had warrants out for their arrest for burglary and home invasion.
We felt like others were involved with these people because they never found the pizza.
People do watch grocery stores and shoppers.
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Old 03-03-2007, 06:01 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
It depends on how you look at it. Just in mental terms maybe.

It is sometimes paired with alcoholism and drug addiction. Or just a person falling on exremely hard times like in the movie and being forced to live out in the streets or subway.

What would you call it? A disadvantage, maybe?
There is much more to poverty than circumstance. Much of it is epidemic, endemic, institutionally set by government policy--and well-meaning rescuers. AND it does become a mindset in those that are affected. It behooves those of us who are NOT in poverty to understand its roots and rip them out. We will all be raised. AND it is NOT a question of being too lazy to get work or to help themselves.
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Old 03-03-2007, 07:12 AM   #36
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I, also, make a point of donating to my local food bank. Over the years I've met, like, and admire a lot of "charity professionals". They usually make more than my husband and me, put together, ever have. I'm sure they are worth every penny, BUT .... I don't want to pay their salaries. So I go shopping every month or so and leave a few bags at the food bank. At Christmas I thow a party with a "price of admission" of food, paper, or cleaning products. I've been "broke"; thank heaven never needed to use this service (indeed, I didn't know it existed!) -- when I was down & out I was gainfully employed ... my hospital bills just put me so far down I really didn't ever think I'd be out of debt. Luckily my mother taught and preached birth control (don't have babies until you can support them), so at least I wasn't a single mother. I also have to laugh. She insisted I learn to type; and much as I hated that, I also have never had to be a minimum wage slave. In D.C., if you had ten fingers and knew how to use them, and a CLEAN history (i.e., can pass a security clearance), well, you had a job. Back in those days you could not use a credit card at grocery stores, so I often ate stuff that I could "buy" at drug stores. It cost more (a LOT more), but when there is nothing behind the check ..... many weeks I ate frozen pizzas and other convenience foods because that's what I could put on VISA. It is a false economy, but that is all I had the few days before payday.
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Old 03-03-2007, 08:23 AM   #37
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If anyone wanted to know or see poverty first-hand, then Hurricane Katrina was one of the perfect examples of that subject.

Two small children were on the air on location just days after the monster storm hit. A little boy named Charlie, age 9, spoke out. "We just need some help out here. It's pitiful, it's pitiful!!", he yelled. Then a little girl spoke out.

When I saw that, I lost it, became so upset that I cried!! My heart just poured out to those two kids!! I wished that there was some way to help them.
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Old 03-03-2007, 11:28 AM   #38
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I've been way closer to poor than rich, and slightly closer to rich than poor.

In my very humble opinion, if we can feel good about feeding a third world child for "less than a dollar a day," we would do well to think of our own nourishment in the same light. There are many folks, in the US and elsewhere who could benefit from better nutrition. For instance, I have looked into the matter on the Internet but I can't find the the nutritional value of a well made stock. Is collagen a good nutritional dollar value?

I think that we, in this forum, could provide a wealth of information to folks, here and abroad, struggling to get enough calories and nutrition on limited resources, and that it would be best to do it in a dedicated forum.

There is an attitude that if you can afford a computer you aren't poor but I think computer access, worldwide, is becoming almost as ubiquitous as radio. This forum is big enough to include information for both the molecular gastronomists, and very basic home economists, struggling to keep their families healthy.

What do you think?
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:07 PM   #39
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I absolutely HATE to see or hear of people starving and in poverty, especially children!! They just can't help themselves, and they should not have to go through that ordeal.

Cable and satelite TV are supposed to be considered a luxury as well, but who wants to be fighting all the time with rabbit ears?
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:26 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
I absolutely HATE to see or hear of people starving and in poverty, especially children!! They just can't help themselves, and they should not have to go through that ordeal.

Cable and satelite TV are supposed to be considered a luxury as well, but who wants to be fighting all the time with rabbit ears?
OK Corey, you're a gadget guy. The old story is grind your corn once a week and your wheat once a month. How about you and I chip in, maybe with some help from other folks in the forum, to provide a communal mill and some corn and wheat to a family, or even a refugee camp or village in Darfur?
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