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Old 03-03-2007, 12:33 PM   #41
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When we had the greenhouses, we had a big cargo van for deliveries. At Christmas, my husband donated his time and the use of the van to deliver food baskets to the needy, and it was a real eye-opener for him. He had no idea of the abject poverty right here in our own back yard.

I agree with Corey that poverty is, in some cases, a disease. I've seen families who have lived in poverty for generations. Occasionally, one of the young ones will struggle to get out...sometimes they make it...more often, they don't.
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:54 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
When we had the greenhouses, we had a big cargo van for deliveries. At Christmas, my husband donated his time and the use of the van to deliver food baskets to the needy, and it was a real eye-opener for him. He had no idea of the abject poverty right here in our own back yard.

I agree with Corey that poverty is, in some cases, a disease. I've seen families who have lived in poverty for generations. Occasionally, one of the young ones will struggle to get out...sometimes they make it...more often, they don't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
For a look at poverty living, Will Smith's latest movie, The Pursuit of Happyness will give you a moving and powerful look at how this disease affects those who may encounter it.

He plays Christopher Gardner, who, with his then small son in tow, went from real-life rags to riches by landing a good paying job as a broker.

Smith's own real-life son little Jaden Christopher Seayer Smith played his son in the film. It was both sad and heartwarming to me. It should be coming to pay-per-view soon.
I just had to put these two posts together.
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Old 03-03-2007, 02:18 PM   #43
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Here is what I call the cycle of poverty it can start by someone getting pregnant too young probably drop out of school cant get a decent job have more kids live sometimes out of town because in town rent is too much,live with cheap rent but not heat efficient etc spend to much on trying to stay warm etc.Drive to town in an old gas guzzler with crappy tires spending alot to keep it going,car breaks down costs a fortune to fix.Cant get a decent reliable little economy car because of no or bad credit and cant come up with a down payment.
Kids get sick no health insurance hafto pay full price at the doctor.Cant afford birth control have more kids then rack up a huge hospital bill giving birth.Husband falls off the roof trying to patch a leak on roof hurt bad no insurance more hospital bills he cant work because of injury.Maybe they get a small windfall of money and then spend it on crap and eating out as they are so sick to death of trying so hard and yet not ever having anything.
And the list goes on.These people dont stand a chance of getting ahead with all the obstacles they hafto overcome.
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Old 03-05-2007, 04:34 PM   #44
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Yes, folks, there is no such thing as free lunch, no matter how you look at it. The simplicity of a vegetable garden takes hours of work, gallons of water, in most places some soil amendment. Even then I've planted a lot, nurtured those little things, and when harvest time came around had zilch. All it takes is a couple of caterpillars or birds to destroy an entire crop. No, not a plague of them, quite literally just a hungry couple. After a few years you learn how to deal with the creatures, fungi, and weather in your area, but it can still mean that you've paid and worked your patootie off .... only to find yourself having to figure out what to do with those plants in the fall ... that never gave you a single thing. You have to love it to do it. Ditto hunting. We had a deer disease problem here and many who count on venison for part of their food budget were SOL. I don't let it discourage me, I do still have a small veg and good sized herb garden. But it is no guarantee. Hubby and I look at a shed in our yard and think about putting in a skylight so we can start our own seedlings, but I suspect it isn't going to happen. In fact, we don't need to cut corners on food, it just is second nature because of how we were raised.
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Old 03-05-2007, 04:37 PM   #45
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mcgrew, you have a strong advocate in me. Mom taught my sisters and me that lesson very early; our family hasn't had an "accident" (many loved and beloved children, but no accidents) in two generations. I agree that it is the biggest contribution to poverty.
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Old 03-05-2007, 04:49 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
Brands of peanut butter not affected by the recall, are dirt cheap....STOCK UP!
I second that, It was a the only food source for a couple of months to pull me through.
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Old 03-05-2007, 05:04 PM   #47
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You dont hafto have a garden to grow vegetables I grow all my tomatoes and such in large containers.I can grow at least 3 tomato plants in a 5 gallon container.
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Old 03-05-2007, 05:12 PM   #48
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It's interesting to see the evolution of this thread and everyone has made good points.

Even though I was brought up not wanting for anything, I was friends with and went to school with people who didn't have two nickels to rub together and, in some cases, no clue where their next meal would come from.

My parents always made sure the 5 of us children were clothed and fed. I didn't realize until I was grown and away from home that we were probably considered "rich" by many in our community. My daddy was a physician. A country doctor, really. Being the doc made him smart and where I lived, being smart equated to being successful which, in turn, meant rich. What many people didn't know were the numbers of daddy's patients who never paid or weren't charged because they had little or no money. More often than not, he was paid with baskets of fresh produce, chickens, sides of beef, fresh eggs, and the like. I can still taste Mrs. Hettie Bowe's strawberry jam.

Now, having said what I just said, we were not indulged. Nothing was wasted in our house and we didn't live extravagantly. When I was in the eighth grade, I worked in the school cafeteria in exchange for my lunch. Every Monday, daddy "paid" me my lunch money for the week...$1.25. As soon as I could, I got a job for my spending money. Occasionally I would babysit to for more income. Not much babysitting work was to be had, though, because folks in my community simply didn't go out without their children.

My brothers worked in the summertime for local farmers doing hot, hard farm work. None of the 5 of us were/are afraid of hard work.

When I had my family, I followed the same practices I'd learned growing up. And, I guess, the lessons stuck because all of our children appreciate the value of a job well-done and, too, don't shy from hard work. As children do, they learned from example. There was a time when, together, Buck and I worked 8 jobs to keep the wolves away from the door. Sleep during that period was a luxury.

I guess my point is, sometimes it would be so easy to give up. I just can't. I stubborn that way. When I see someone struggling, I'll help them as long as I see they are making an effort and continue to do so. As soon as it becomes my job to take up the slack, that's when they are back on their own. I've seen too many people with their hands out as their job. The Washington, D.C. area was filled with them.
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Old 03-05-2007, 05:15 PM   #49
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Mcgrew, my two container tomato plants have had two bad years. Root end rot. So I spent the $$ for the plants and didn't get any fruit. I'm hoping that using them for peppers this year will help that problem. But you know what? It is time for us to start a line elswhere for help in growing food. I know it is only March, but it is time to think of it!
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Old 03-05-2007, 07:20 PM   #50
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Claire,Did you drill some holes into the bottom of pot assuming its a plastic bucket?.I do that then add a good layer of styrofoam it can be an old styrofoam cooler broken into pieces or the packing foam make sure its not the cornstarch ones that melt away when wet.Lastly I mix a good bit of vermiculite into soil you can get it at Walmart real cheap it helps getting oxygen into the soil and keeping it loose.Dont get me wrong I certainly am not an experienced gardener but so far this has worked for me for about 6 years.
I notice yo are in IL in that case I would consider drilling a few small holes into side of container due to the high humidity.Another thing is to make sure you are not over watering.
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