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Old 03-07-2007, 10:21 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by skilletlicker
GB, Thank you for the clarification. I could have sworn I remembered comments about natural development of conversation being inevitable and necessary to adult discourse. If that is not is not allowed here, thanks for pointing out the the prohibition.
No you are correct skilletlicker. There is something somewhere that says something along those lines, but the actual policy is that threads should stay on topic.

There are times where there will be a natural progression of a conversation and we try to let those happen when we can, but usually things like that should be split off into new threads when they can be.
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Old 03-07-2007, 11:27 AM   #62
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The post mentioned growing vegetables in pots I thought that went along with getting the most nutrition for the least amount of money.
Im confused and dont want to get get in any more trouble than I already am.
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Old 03-07-2007, 11:34 AM   #63
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Michael is right about my original intent, but I have enjoyed the way this discussion has progressed.

The thing that used to bother me when my children were little, was standing in line at the supermarket behind a mother with food stamps, watching her buy all the chips, candy and sodas that my kids were begging for, but I couldn't afford. Invariably, the mother had a rear end as wide as the grocery cart, and the little ones were snotty-nosed and un-washed.

My children certainly didn't suffer...I fed them good, nutritious food on what little I had to spend, but it aggravated me that my taxes were going to pay for things I couldn't buy for my own kids.

Things haven't changed today. A trip to the box store on the 3rd or 4th of the month will find those children all grown up now, with kids of their own, buying the same junk food. Most of them are overweight, kids and adults.

My point here, is that an educational program is needed to educate food stamp recipricants as to how to feed their families healthier food. We take it for granted, because the information is easily available, that everyone knows what it takes to have a balanced diet, but most these people have no clue.
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Old 03-07-2007, 12:57 PM   #64
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I live in a condominium. My neighbors complain when I have foster kittens staying with me. Can you imagine if I tried raising some chickens? Hve you ever smelled a chicken coop?

I just think it's a shame that the poor are constantly being arrested for stealing food, while our Federal Government is paying farmers NOT to grow it. Talk about "your tax dollars at work!"
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Old 03-08-2007, 02:12 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Michael is right about my original intent, but I have enjoyed the way this discussion has progressed.

The thing that used to bother me when my children were little, was standing in line at the supermarket behind a mother with food stamps, watching her buy all the chips, candy and sodas that my kids were begging for, but I couldn't afford. Invariably, the mother had a rear end as wide as the grocery cart, and the little ones were snotty-nosed and un-washed.

My children certainly didn't suffer...I fed them good, nutritious food on what little I had to spend, but it aggravated me that my taxes were going to pay for things I couldn't buy for my own kids.

Things haven't changed today. A trip to the box store on the 3rd or 4th of the month will find those children all grown up now, with kids of their own, buying the same junk food. Most of them are overweight, kids and adults.

My point here, is that an educational program is needed to educate food stamp recipricants as to how to feed their families healthier food. We take it for granted, because the information is easily available, that everyone knows what it takes to have a balanced diet, but most these people have no clue.
I think Constance's premise is right. I also think we, in this forum, are uniquely well positioned to assist in her admirably articulated undertaking. As I said in an earlier post, the accessibility to the Internet by the malnourished and under-nourished is continuously increasing radically.

I also am firmly convinced that there would be multilateral benefits form the exchange of information and experience from all over the world.

The conversation might provoke views involving Religion, Politics, and Nationalism, but this could be effectively controlled by our esteemed administrators and moderators.

I repeat that a forum dedicated to the best nutrition possible on variously restricted budgets would be worth while. It would also probably increase the participation and publicity of the forum. After all, we don't have too many molecular gastronomists presently participating.
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Old 03-08-2007, 07:58 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by skilletlicker

The conversation might provoke views involving Religion, Politics, and Nationalism, but this could be effectively controlled by our esteemed administrators and moderators.
Lets please not forget though that these things are against the rules here though. While the staff will remove anything like this, it is the members responsibility not to post it in the first place. Thank you everyone for following these rules as this is one of the things that separates us from all the other boards out there. That being our great members who respect each other and the rules we have. Thanks everyone. [/highjack]
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Old 03-16-2007, 09:19 PM   #67
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Yes, they are large wooden barrels with holes in the bottom and plenty of air even between the slats. I just think I need to rotate my crops! I also grow tomatoes in the ground, and haven't had a problem with them (oh, dear, is there some wood nearby to knock on?). I find Early Girls to be the best tomato to grow here since we have such a short growing season. In the tubs I would grow patio tomatoes or plum tomatoes. I have several small gardens, and I think I just need to .... well, rotate.
Claire - I live in Michigan in the boonies (have 10 acres about 40 minutes north of Detroit). I have not in 17 years time had success with traditional gardening techniques regardless of my preventative efforts. Either the netting 12" below the surface failed to prevent the rabbit devastation, the fence was not higher then 6', and therefore the deer eat what they wanted, or in the case of tomatoes pretty close to the house... the animals found a way. The last straw for me was the 200+ tomatoes that had a single bite out of each single fruit one day while they were still green... I think the animals (I think a raccoon) was/were trying to tell me something.

Anyway, the next thing I am going to try is to grow "only" tomatoes, and herbs, and they will be done in containers, within a couple feet of the house. The thing I wanted to mention is that if you have a raised container, you can grow your tomatoes "downward" and the rot / disease issue should be history. Also, if you do your containers raised (for the tomatoes), you can grow your herbs in the "top" of those same containers.

Granted, I have not yet tried this, but given the flavor of fresh tomatoes, and fresh clipped herbs, I will try and do this year if time permits. Even if only a few Herbs, and Cherry tomatoes.



Just something for you to consider.
Casper
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