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Old 02-19-2007, 08:12 PM   #1
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Poverty living...

Thankfully, I don't think any of us need these tips, but having been hungry at one time in my life, I found them interesting.

The Simple Dollar » Nourishment on a Desperate Income

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Old 02-19-2007, 08:28 PM   #2
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1. Cook at home. Never eat out. Dining out is so much more expensive than eating at home that the two are incomparable. Stay at home and make your own food rather than eating at a restaurant. It’s often more work, but it’s also money in your pocket.


darn it! It seems impracticle to cook for one, and after working a 16 hour day, the last thing I wanna do is come home and cook, but I agree. It does hit the wallet.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:17 PM   #3
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Number 3 sounded a bit extreme to me


3. Keep a hen or two. This seems somewhat silly, but female chickens are very good at producing food. You can unabashedly feed them whatever scraps you have and they produce eggs very regularly. If you’re careful, you can keep them in a small cage in your own apartment; a friend of mine kept one in a pet porter for several months. Just be aware of the smell; you should line their living area with paper and expect to clean it a lot. You can do this by using scavenged newspapers and rotating them daily, but leave the papers that the chicken scratches together for a nest alone.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:27 PM   #4
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Hrm, that's an interesting site.

I find one of the greatest resources for periods when uni takes over from everything else and thus I don't have the time to work enough to live, is myself now (When I do have the time) and a local wholesale store.

Cans of tinned crushed Roma tomatoes are the one thing that my kitchen would miss most, if I didn't have any. I *adore* them. They thicken, they flavour, they turn into sauces and soups and gravy bases and casseroles and juice, if you want.

So, when I go to the wholesale store in a few weeks, I'm going to pick up a box, and put it under my house. Along with a sack of rice (That'll go in a cheap plastic garbage bin, to keep wildlife out) and my freezer'o'meat, it should provide me with a month of boring, tiresome, nutritious food when I'm too poor for anything else.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:30 PM   #5
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Cook at home. Never eat out. This is true if you are really in a dire situation financially. If not, you can create a restaurant-quality meal for far less than eating out if you have the skills and desire. You can "dine" at home with attention paid to how the table looks, decorations, ambience, etc. I've done it many times. That's how I came to be married to Buck.

Stews and soups are miraculous. Even meatless ones that contain peas, lentils and legumes can satisfy for a long while. A hearty pot of soup can be had with a dollars' worth of dried beans, some canned broth or bouillon cubes and water.

Grow some of our own vegetables. Amen to this. When I didn't have the space, I used containers. Even large kitty litter buckets with drainage holds drilled in the bottom work well for tomatoes. Now I grow vegetables using hay bale gardening. Growing your own veggies is convenient and the flavor is far better than what can be had at the usual produce section of many stores. Plus, you KNOW what kind of pesticides (or not) have been on them.

Don't fear the leftovers. I regularly save small amounts of frozen veggies from larger bags to add to soups and stews. Ditto for dibs and dabs of cooked leftovers. I also save the broken lasagna, manicotti, large shell pasta to use in soups.

Look in discarded newspapers and circulars for coupons. Use coupons anyway! Except, only use coupons for foods/things you actually like/use. Many times the house brand of an item is less expensive than the name brand with a coupon. Also look for "double" or "triple" coupon offers in your markets.

When you go to the grocery store, use a shopping list and stick to it. I'll also add that you should stay to the outside perimeter of the store and avoid the endcaps, which are usually filled with items to entice you. I have generated a computer shopping list for items I always need to purchase, along with spaces to add specific additional items. I rarely stray from my list. As a result, I spend a lot less each time I shop.

Just my take on this thread.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
1. Cook at home. Never eat out. Dining out is so much more expensive than eating at home that the two are incomparable. Stay at home and make your own food rather than eating at a restaurant. It’s often more work, but it’s also money in your pocket.


darn it! It seems impracticle to cook for one, and after working a 16 hour day, the last thing I wanna do is come home and cook, but I agree. It does hit the wallet.
When you are working and have income, it is budget that is your concern.
You should never use your "eating out" money on groceries. In this day and age, cooking at home and dining out are very comparable especially for the single person.
One night I was at the grocery and decided to pick up groceries for hamburgers. (and hamburgers only). When I saw that I was accumulating about $20 for the hamburgers, I put everything back, dug up a coupon and headed for the drive-thru at the burger place, two value meals to include frys & drink (which I could not afford at the grocery) for about $12.
Sometimes you have leftovers when cooking at home; sometimes it is waste. If you don't have any plans for a head of lettuce except a few strands for a burger and you are not making plans for a salad, eventually you will throw the lettuce in the trash.
You should always have food at home called "staples" and beverages. But you should not go hungry at lunch because your lunch money is tied up at home in groceries and you did not have time to make lunch.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:44 PM   #7
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As for cooking for a single person, I know what you mean. Individual pieces of meat are more expensive (Or unavailable), vegetables, creams, and other fresh produce goes off before you can use it, you put alot of effort into cooking what only lasts for a few minutes in some cases...

So I gave up. I now cook for 2. Or 4. The leftovers go into the fridge for two days and into the freezer at 4. Sure, I'm out of space in the freezer, but eating one of leftovers for lunch the next day, I'm left with two ready made meals (Or sometimes, none at all), and so i'm all set.

As for food buying / saving, I freeze everything. If a pumpkin wasn't used and is about to go off, I chop it up and freeze it. Yes, it goes a funny colour. Yes, it goes squishy. Yes, it's just fine if you use it in a soup, or a puree, or risotto. Carrots can still be made into a Mire Poix, cabbage is a little limp but is OK if you're stuffing something with it (Or you like it soggy with butter like my mother).

I buy BBQ chickens when they're discounted, chill them, separate into quarters and freeze. Once I've used the flesh from one I pop the bones into a ziplock bag and freeze again, ready to make (Not as good, but still acceptable) stock.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadlex

I buy BBQ chickens when they're discounted, chill them, separate into quarters and freeze. Once I've used the flesh from one I pop the bones into a ziplock bag and freeze again, ready to make (Not as good, but still acceptable) stock.
Quadlex, another thing you can do with those discounted chickens is to remove the meat from the bones, chop it up and use it in recipes that call for chopped cooked chicken. Casseroles, enchiladas, quesadillas, chicken salad, etc.
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Old 02-19-2007, 09:59 PM   #9
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Hence the "Once I've used the flesh" :P

Actually, I think I'll post the recipe I make most often from them, as a greeting recipe. It's not fancy, or expensive, but I like it. As does my partner. And his mother. And their friends. Don't you love it when a recipe goes viral?
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Old 02-19-2007, 10:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StirBlue
When you are working and have income, it is budget that is your concern.
You should never use your "eating out" money on groceries. In this day and age, cooking at home and dining out are very comparable especially for the single person.
One night I was at the grocery and decided to pick up groceries for hamburgers. (and hamburgers only). When I saw that I was accumulating about $20 for the hamburgers, I put everything back, dug up a coupon and headed for the drive-thru at the burger place, two value meals to include frys & drink (which I could not afford at the grocery) for about $12.
Sometimes you have leftovers when cooking at home; sometimes it is waste. If you don't have any plans for a head of lettuce except a few strands for a burger and you are not making plans for a salad, eventually you will throw the lettuce in the trash.
You should always have food at home called "staples" and beverages. But you should not go hungry at lunch because your lunch money is tied up at home in groceries and you did not have time to make lunch.

That is my point exactly. If I were to go out and "shop", budget is NOT the issue, it is what am I buying that is going to sit in the fridge till it goes bad. I do have staples, and will never NOT have a midnight snack, or even something that if company comes over, I can't thaw/throw on the grill/entertain with.

As for lunch breaks, I work in a kitchen, I run a kitchen, if I get hungry, I eat. But either way, after looking at food for 12-16+hours a day, no matter what it is, I get tired of looking at food, and do not want to take a to go box, or cook when I get home...That is another reason it is hard to cook at home, I eat my "squares" at work, I am only home long enough to enjoy a beverage or three, have a quick bite and call it a night.
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