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Old 10-31-2010, 12:01 AM   #61
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First, a huge thank you to those who opposed the judgmental portion of this thread. That being said, it is an interesting discussion, but I think several things are being overlooked.

For starters, no one knows what or why people buy what they do, but it is not simply food choices that cause obesity. When I was a child, we had home-cooking by Mom and the treat was McD's once a month. In those days, keeping weight ON was the issue. Mind you, we were outside and active all of the time. My parents gardened, took walks, played outdoor games with us, etc. We went hiking, camping, fishing as a family. In the summer time, I would wake, make a sandwich and go to the pool. I was there when it opened and left when it closed. I bicycled everywhere (without a helmet.)

Today, many children are heavily scheduled from the time they wake until they sleep. I work with kids who have zero time to be kids. When they have free time, they don't know how to play. Make a fort from blankets? No, play X-box. Bicycle? Only if mom and dad get their bikes out and they have comfortable helmets AND they do not ride in a street or anywhere out of sight from home. We now have a media campaign trying to encourage parents and children to get in 90 minutes of "active" play a day. To me, that is so disheartening. I am sad to say that I put on the freshman 15 pounds earlier than my friends when I learned that pushing a car pedal was easier than a bike pedal.

Growing up, my mother stayed home and my dad was home by 4 PM. I feel like a convict who just got paroled just before the warden was going to pull the switch if I leave my job by 4 PM. Sixteen hour days are not uncommon for me and unfortunately it is the price of my job. (And I love my job even if I would not wish it on anyone.) I have found among my peers that 12 to 16 hour days are not uncommon. By the time I get home, I'm starving. In this, I am lucky to have someone who enjoys cooking as much as I do.

Between the two of us, we eat fairly healthy food. However, that being said, we both like to cook - as does everyone who is likely posting on this board. We have to remember that not everyone enjoys cooking. Heck, I know people who do not especially enjoy eating and consider fine dining when you soil a plate after cranking open a can of Chef-Boy-R-Dee Ravioli. (The fine-dining part according to this crowd is that they use a washable plate.) My favorite offender of this is a woman who is so into sports that she will eat whatever she can on her way to the tennis courts or what-have you and looks the very picture of health. She keeps herself ridiculously busy. Once when I joined her for lunch, her pantry contained gatorade, twinkies, and protein bars, and she whined about the time it took to go to Subway for a sandwich.

This thread started with the assumption of ignorance and laziness, but really there are multiple issues: Healthy eating, obesity, and exercise to name but a few. We also need to consider finances, genetics, lifestyle, medical abilities, etc. Everyone has 24 hours in a day and we all have obligations we have to meet. For most of us on this board, good cooking is a passion. I am fortunate that is true for me but, with my schedule, if I hated cooking, Twinkies and Diet Coke would be frequently in my shopping cart along with Chef Boy-R-Dee.....and I'd likely eat it straight from the can to keep from having clean up.

~Kathleen
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:22 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by 4meandthem View Post
Poppi-It sounds like England has some sort of ranking system for their pre-made meals.Is this true? Sounds like a good idea.
No, sadly not. There's just a big aisle with the words "Ready meals" emblazoned above and all the way down one side are budget types, then medium-priced meals, then the more expensive. For example, Sainsbury's have a trade name called "Taste the Difference", whereas Tesco has "Tesco Finest" - all brands. I don't do Tesco. The staff there are rude. Sainsbury's premades for me, although Waitrose, a sub of the John Lewis Group have similar ready meals, but the latter is very high quality with plenty of good meat. And certainly not the size of a cat's portion that, only 4 years ago, became the laughing stock of Britain's supermarket own-brands.

The big supermarket chains have cleaned up their act. Public demand - and past derision - have made demands and the supermarkets cottoned on and brought out a fantastic, ever-changing brand of these meals to satisfy even me.

This weekend's food is far different for ready meals, premades etc. In our oven is a massive joint of forerib of beef. What Georgie boy laughingly calls "Fred Flintsone". It has to be massive, this forerib. He eats like a horse. Typical strapping lad who could wuite easily demolish 5 ready meals in succession. Oh, and I've just remembered that soon he'll 14. George will eat us out house and home at this rate!
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Old 10-31-2010, 09:53 AM   #63
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I think this thread started out somewhat good intentioned, but OP's use of the word "slob" really was uncalled for. Also, the assumption that anyone cooks from scratch these days is just a bit naive.
I was astonished to see the word slob used based on what was seen in a shopping cart. How can you form that opinion based on what is in a cart?
As far as cooking from scratch goes, do you have a bag of flour in your pantry, or a can of tomato product in your cupboard, a gallon of milk in your fridge? Those are also convenience items as are many more that could be mentioned. I'm fairly certain no one on this board grows their own wheat to mill into flour.
And I'm willing to bet OP has some sort of frozen food item in the freezer. Maybe not a TV dinner, but something.
Slob....really?
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Old 10-31-2010, 01:31 PM   #64
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I agree that it was the word "slob" that got to me too. It did turn out into an interesting discussion; however, it points out the need to review our posts before saving. The written word can easily be misunderstood.
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Old 10-31-2010, 02:58 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poppi G. Koullias View Post
No, sadly not. There's just a big aisle with the words "Ready meals" emblazoned above and all the way down one side are budget types, then medium-priced meals, then the more expensive. For example, Sainsbury's have a trade name called "Taste the Difference", whereas Tesco has "Tesco Finest" - all brands. I don't do Tesco. The staff there are rude. Sainsbury's premades for me, although Waitrose, a sub of the John Lewis Group have similar ready meals, but the latter is very high quality with plenty of good meat. And certainly not the size of a cat's portion that, only 4 years ago, became the laughing stock of Britain's supermarket own-brands.

The big supermarket chains have cleaned up their act. Public demand - and past derision - have made demands and the supermarkets cottoned on and brought out a fantastic, ever-changing brand of these meals to satisfy even me.

This weekend's food is far different for ready meals, premades etc. In our oven is a massive joint of forerib of beef. What Georgie boy laughingly calls "Fred Flintsone". It has to be massive, this forerib. He eats like a horse. Typical strapping lad who could wuite easily demolish 5 ready meals in succession. Oh, and I've just remembered that soon he'll 14. George will eat us out house and home at this rate!
We have similar offerings here. You will find lower to medium quality meals in the frozen food section, and often the higher quality items are in the deli in a section for meal solutions, these are usually much better with real recognizable meat and veg in them. They are almost always sold "fresh" never frozen.
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Old 10-31-2010, 03:15 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
I agree that it was the word "slob" that got to me too. It did turn out into an interesting discussion; however, it points out the need to review our posts before saving. The written word can easily be misunderstood.
Same here. The word turned me off, and Fish's post was a bit of a rant, so I passed over this thread for a couple days until I noticed that it stayed up on my DC homepage.

One thing I try to keep in mind is that DC's posters span the world and represent many cultures. It's possible that the word "slob" does not have quite the insult in England as it does in the U.S. So, I try to give all contributors to DC, any given post, the benefit of doubt, and try to remember that some cultures and some people's personal preferences equate "fat" with "beauty."

I haven't met any, but I suppose there are also "Supermarket Snobs" roaming the aisles, too.
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Old 10-31-2010, 05:39 PM   #67
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"I haven't met any, but I suppose there are also "Supermarket Snobs" roaming the aisles, too."

You read my mind.

You do have a good point about other cultures. We do need to remember that.

The word "slob" is such a nasty word, but it also bothered me in that I think of a slob as a messy or dirty person, and that has nothing to do with shopping.
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Old 10-31-2010, 06:27 PM   #68
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However, I'm pretty sure in this case that slob isn't a term of endearment or a compliment so it's still hard to fathom how that opinion could be formed based on what is in a person's shopping cart.
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Old 10-31-2010, 06:45 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
We have similar offerings here. You will find lower to medium quality meals in the frozen food section, and often the higher quality items are in the deli in a section for meal solutions, these are usually much better with real recognizable meat and veg in them. They are almost always sold "fresh" never frozen.
Yes, never frozen here.

Interesting, but in my country there are no ready meals at all. Our supermarkets are either small, privately owned and humble, or large but not like the French hypermarkets that resemble aircraft hangars. And what those must be like at Christmas time isn't worth thinking about! But in ours, all food is fresh: meat, dairy though lots of frozen fish and lamb. We Greeks only have fresh lamb at around Easter time.
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Old 10-31-2010, 06:56 PM   #70
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The title made this thread interesting. Although I didn't like the word the title had a good catch phrase. I can guarantee you that this thread would have never grown multiple pages as it did if not for the word slob.
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