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Old 03-19-2007, 08:37 PM   #1
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Unpasteurized Yogurt

I've had a bad inner ear infection, which I let go too long, until had it spread to my lymph glands and digestive system. The doctor put me on 1500 mg's of amoxicillin a day for 10 days, which initiated the usual side effects of penicillon on my already stressed innards.
A friend suggested that I needed to eat unpasteurized yogurt to replace all my beneficial bacteria which were killed by the infection and antibiotic.

DH bought me an 8-pack of Dannon Activia, and I'm here to tell you that it is some good stuff. Not only does it normalize your system, it's delicious! I would eat it whether I needed it or not.

They make a lite variety, but the regular is only 110 calories, which makes me a pretty decent breakfast every day.

Note: I'm normally not a breakfast eater. If you are, you'll need to eat some whole grain toast or cereal with it.

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Old 03-19-2007, 10:54 PM   #2
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Yogurt with active cultures is also great after a bad stomach flu easy on the system and it puts back the beneficial bacteria to balance it out.
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Old 04-06-2007, 12:40 AM   #3
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Cool. I'll keep this in mind!
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Old 04-06-2007, 12:40 PM   #4
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gotta ask, what is unpasteurized yogurt??

Yogurt made from unpasteurized milk?

Is yogurt usually pasteurized? so unpasteurized is different from "regular" yogurt?

just never heard of unpasteurized yogurt..

If yogurt were pasteurized, wouldn't that kill the friendly bacteria?...help!
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Old 04-06-2007, 02:34 PM   #5
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I think this is yogurt with active cultures. The yogurt is made with pasteurized milk and the yogurt cultures are added.

I'm pretty sure unpasteurized milk is not allowed by the FDA.
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Old 04-06-2007, 04:54 PM   #6
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My mom told my sister and I early on about the yogurt trick any time we were on antibiotics to help prevent yeast infections (sorry men) ... I still use it but eat just the "regular" yogurt like Yoplait or Dannon, lite versions of both and have had just as good results. I'm happy to hear that the Activia tastes good though! I recently tried a cottage cheese that was supposed to be helpful for IBS but it was terrible and it gave my digestive system a worse time than the stuff I normally eat!

I don't mean to down play or poo - poo the newer yogurt products that are coming out, advertising their digestive qualities, but I have to wonder how different they are from the original thing. Are they adding something different? What do the new ones offer that the old ones don't already accomplish? It reminds me of when Jello started to advertise their pudding as "now fat free" even though all along, if you used skim milk, it was. I don't know. Again, I mean no disrespect - just wondering out loud...
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Old 04-06-2007, 05:11 PM   #7
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i think two things are going on here,

one, it's a new gimmic to get you to try it. Just like toothpaste. Remember when it was a no brainer to buy toothpaste? Now there are way too many choices. New gimmics create a buzz for the product

two, i think it actually has a different strain of bacteria. But I find nothing wrong with the old standard strains of bacteria added to yogurt. When I make yogurt, I look for a brand that has three different bacterias, always forget what 3 they are...L's something

just thinking aloud...
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:40 PM   #8
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You can buy raw milk, which would be unpasteurized. But many states do not allow sale of raw milk. And those states that do sell it, can only sell it for animal consumption.

I buy raw milk and then make my own yogurt. It is an extremely easy procedure, and Yummo!!
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:51 PM   #9
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We buy raw milk, cow and goat, in Washington and it is what we use to make cheese and cultured butter. It can be hard to locate but it is available at least here.
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Old 04-06-2007, 10:28 PM   #10
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Beth - I was thinking along the same lines (and there are times in the store when I am contemplating flavor, texture and brand that just baking soda on my brush sounds good!). Interesting, though, that there are actually different strains that can create the same product. Does it greatly affect the taste?

As far as raw milk, around here, you can purchase it from most any farmer that isn't already selling to a cheese house. I think you might need to have a pretty good relationship already established to ask, though, just because milk is gold around here. I have a cousin who milks that I can get cream from to make butter (when I actually get the time to do it!). I've often thought making yogurt sounded good but lack of time and, honestly, fear have stopped me.
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