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Old 09-07-2004, 11:25 AM   #1
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What is %age hydrogenated fat in "FULL FAT" cheese

Are there any experts out there who can tell me what percentage of hydrogenated animal fat can be expected in "full fat" cheeses like Gorgonzola, Talegio, Cheddar, Brie, Camembert?

I have had two bits of advice, one at 30-35% and another at 40-45%.

Any others please?

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Old 09-07-2004, 02:35 PM   #2
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I thought it was about 37% but I could be out to lunch...hope someone else has a better answer for you.
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Old 09-07-2004, 06:21 PM   #3
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I may be way off base, but I think the answer is zero. Here's why I think so. Hydrogenated fats are fats that are liquid at room temperature but have hydrogen atoms added to make them more solid at room temperature. These are trans fats, I believe. Examples would be margarine and vegetable shortening. Animal fats contain saturated fat, which is not the same thing. Neither one is all that good for you, but moderation is the key. Monounsaturated fats are supposed to be the healthiest, but they are still fats, and too much of a good thing can sabatoge your diet. I'd be interested in hearing from other people on this topic.
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Old 09-07-2004, 10:48 PM   #4
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Indeed, saturated fats contain molecules of hydrogen. And this is what makes them faily stable at room temperature. However, they still absorb sulphur compounds and also oxygenate. They then are unfit to eat, or smell. They become rancid.

Hydorginated fats are known as transfats. They have had extra hydrogen atoms added to the poly-unsaturated fats. The polyunsaturated versions are not stable and quickly go rancid in the presence of oxygen. They also are liquid at room temp. When the hydrogen atom is added, it fills in the "holes" and so make it so the fat molecule is stable and unable to absorb sulphur compounds. They are also solid at room temperature. Actually the state is reffered to as plastic in the scientific world. It's somewhere between a solid and liquid. The problem with these fats is they lack the nutritional value of animal fats (yes there are nutrional pluses to animal fats), but have all of the bad effects. They are truly the least healthy of the fats.

Mono-unsaturates help reduce the LDL (low-density-lippo-protien) cholesterol, the stuff that damages the circulatory system, and increases the HDL (high-desity-lippo-protien) that is actually good for the body. Also, some animal fats, such as fish oil, contain omega-3 fatty acids. These are required for proper brain growth (important for developing fetus and small children) and and maintenance of the brain (essential for all of us). Also, some nutrients, especially vitamins such as vitamin-E can only be obtained through fat, as it is a fat soluble vitamin. There are a host of other nutrients that are obtained through fats as well. The key is moderation. The fats in walnuts and flax seed contain omega-3 as well. But again, in moderation. Fats of any kind are high in calories. They can lead to obesity, and a host of other problems when too much is consumed.

From best to worst:
Olive and Avocado oil
nut oils (especially walnut, brazil nut)
other nut oils
seed oils (sunflower, safflower)
Canola (rapeseed, but this one is controversial. some say it's amazing
while others condem it as worse than animal fats)
Vegetable oils - corn oil, soybean oil, etc.
Coconut oil, cocoa butter, etc.
Animal FAts - lard, butter, etc.
Trans-fats - usually vegetable oil that has been hydrogenated.

That about sums it up. There is a wealth of info on the internet and at your public library. Another great source si your nearby nutritionist. Great people those nutritionists.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-08-2004, 04:02 AM   #5
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Quite right.

I meant to say "saturated", but was thinking of something else.
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Old 09-08-2004, 04:16 AM   #6
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It seems you cannot edit your posts in this forum.

How convenient.
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Old 09-08-2004, 01:17 PM   #7
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Darkstream...any post you make should have a little scissors icon in the top right corner...you should be able to edit with that. Good luck.
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Old 12-30-2004, 04:32 PM   #8
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My understanding is that hydroginated fats are 'manufactured' or fooled around with vegetable fats and that the natural fats are better for you. Personally I do not buy anything that has hydroginated fats in it.
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Old 12-31-2004, 12:26 AM   #9
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Just checked a package of Land o Lakes CoJack full fat cheese. In a one ounce serving there is 9 grams of fat, 6 of which are saturated fat. the calories are 110, of which 80 are from fat.
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