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Old 10-25-2007, 04:15 PM   #11
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Ironically - not only are onions good with liver, they are also good for your liver ... they have sulfur compounds which are important in both detoxification and are a source of glutathione.

For a list of foods (the good and the bad) - try reading this and this.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
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Old 10-25-2007, 07:52 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by YT2095 View Post
Milk Thistle.
You can get it in capsules or pill form i also think that drinking alot of water helps to flush out toxins

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Old 10-26-2007, 01:01 PM   #13
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Avoid fried, spicy foods and high protien foods.
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Old 12-15-2007, 09:36 PM   #14
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If you are where you can do it, and can dig up dandelions, make yourself a dandelion root tonic by soaking the washed roots that you've cut up into 1/8 inch cubes or smaller in whiskey or vodka. Let it sit for about 1 week in a glass bottle and shake daily. Take one T. of the tonic or bitters every day . You'll feel less sluggish in about 2 weeks. Really! Also cut down on the fats in your diet.
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Old 12-16-2007, 06:35 AM   #15
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Have a routine liver function test done. you should yearly, anyway........ no matter what your age......then go from there......if there are any red flags out three then more detailed tests can be done. Especially if chronic drinking is involved or there is a chance of AIDS, hepatits, etc., .......
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
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Old 12-16-2007, 06:47 AM   #16
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Be careful about where you get the dandelion roots. Lawn areas can have fugicides herbicides or insecticides applied to them that are not safe in food. They aren't being applied to a food source and R&D testing is different to meet DEP EPA standards on turf applications. Chemicals can be residual for years in the soil. Yes the formula is required to beak down but the half life of the broken compund is different and not tested for toxicity since its intended use is on a nonfood source
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Old 12-16-2007, 07:24 AM   #17
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good point about the dandelion roots and where they are obtained from! Anyone using herbs you gather yourself should be aware of where they come from. This is the very reason my hubby and I don't even play golf. Think of the chemicals.
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Old 12-16-2007, 09:12 AM   #18
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Quote from that site:


Clinical efficacy of milk thistle is not clearly established. Interpretation of the evidence is hampered by poor study methods and/or poor quality of reporting in publications."

Personally, I would rely only on evidence from accredited higher education sites or organizations such as the Mayo Clinic and the National Institutes of Health. If you're healthy, the liver and kidneys don't need help detoxifying your body, and they detoxify themselves. If you're not, you should be seeing a doctor who specializes in gastroenterology or urology.
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
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Old 12-21-2007, 06:33 AM   #19
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Anything that is not alcoholic is good for the liver..Eat plenty of vegetables and drink lots and lots of water...
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Old 12-21-2007, 10:03 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by radhuni View Post
Avoid fried, spicy foods and high protien foods.

Especially if gallstones are present!

My oldest sister on Thanksgiving told me that she can't have anything that's fried because she has gallstones. I kindly suggested to her that should just go on and have the gallbladder removed.

She said that she's on medicine for it. I told her that she really should see about having surgery. Both Mom and Grandma had to have them removed.

Too much booze is also a no-no. It depleats the liver's ability to process the alcohol, and your liver's number count increases.

Over time, if excessive consumption of booze continues, it sets up the liver to be a prime candidate for sclerosis - an eventually deadly disease that is irreversible, and the only other hopeful thing is a liver transplant. Actors Larry Hagman and Jim Neighbors had to have theirs replaced.

And even then, because of the extremely heavy demand for liver transplant surgeries, you are then placed on a waiting list. First come, first served.

And who knows how long that'll be? You are then forced to hope and pray to God that a good liver is found for you soon!

When one of my brothers died, his liver couldn't even be re-used because it was already heavily damaged from him having had diabetes and and alcoholism.

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