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Old 06-16-2014, 05:02 PM   #1
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3 ways to make a 'dry' martini

Nothing stimulates my hunger like a gin martini! Of course, Make it a double. I like mine "James Bond" style: Stirred not shaken.

There are many ways to make a good dry martini. Here are three methods from dry to driest:
1) Pour vermouth into a martini glass and swirl around. Pour out all of the vermouth and add your favorite gin.
2) Put your vermouth into a small bottle with an atomizer. Pour in your favorite gin and spray a light mist of vermouth over the top.
3) For a really dry martini, pour in your favorite gin and simply pass the unopened vermouth bottle over the top of your martini.

Down the hatch and don't forget the olives! {:-D]

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Old 06-16-2014, 05:35 PM   #2
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The Straight Dope: Why did James Bond want his martinis shaken, not stirred?



Let's start by looking at Bond's drink. He takes vodka and gin in them. Ian Fleming gives a recipe for his Bond's preferred libation in the first Bond book, Casino Royale (1953), chapter 7:
"A dry martini," he said. "One. In a deep champagne goblet."
"Oui, monsieur."
"Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel. Got it?"
He calls this a vesper, after the beautiful double agent from the book (n.b.: Kina Lillet is a brand of vermouth). In other appearances, Bond requests a "medium vodka dry martini," sometimes ordered shaken not stirred. From his vesper recipe, I take "medium vodka dry" to mean he wants a "medium" amount of vodka mixed in with his gin, but who knows? Thanks to John Cork of the Ian Fleming Foundation for digging up the vesper recipe and Bond's other (vodka) martini orders.
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Old 06-16-2014, 06:28 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiklitmanfan View Post
Nothing stimulates my hunger like a gin martini! Of course, Make it a double. I like mine "James Bond" style: Stirred not shaken.

There are many ways to make a good dry martini. Here are three methods from dry to driest:
1) Pour vermouth into a martini glass and swirl around. Pour out all of the vermouth and add your favorite gin.
2) Put your vermouth into a small bottle with an atomizer. Pour in your favorite gin and spray a light mist of vermouth over the top.
3) For a really dry martini, pour in your favorite gin and simply pass the unopened vermouth bottle over the top of your martini.

Down the hatch and don't forget the olives! {:-D]
I think Bond was shaken, not stirred. I'm a stirred guy.

My own formula is one part dry vermouth, 6 parts Citadel gin.
I do like the taste of a little vermouth. Olives, of course.

I have a near complete collection of Sapphire collectors glasses. They make for an interesting conversation starter.
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Old 06-16-2014, 07:56 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
The Straight Dope: Why did James Bond want his martinis shaken, not stirred?



Let's start by looking at Bond's drink. He takes vodka and gin in them. Ian Fleming gives a recipe for his Bond's preferred libation in the first Bond book, Casino Royale (1953), chapter 7:
"A dry martini," he said. "One. In a deep champagne goblet."
"Oui, monsieur."
"Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel. Got it?"
He calls this a vesper, after the beautiful double agent from the book (n.b.: Kina Lillet is a brand of vermouth). In other appearances, Bond requests a "medium vodka dry martini," sometimes ordered shaken not stirred. From his vesper recipe, I take "medium vodka dry" to mean he wants a "medium" amount of vodka mixed in with his gin, but who knows? Thanks to John Cork of the Ian Fleming Foundation for digging up the vesper recipe and Bond's other (vodka) martini orders.
In bars I've worked in a vodka dry martini meant a martini made with vodka rather than gin. Presumably a "medium" vodka martini means not too dry ie more vermouth to vodka than a very dry martini.

I'm a bit of a philistine - I like mine with 2/3rd gin and 1/3rd vermouth and I prefer dry Cinzano rather than Martini vermouth. Never tried French vermouth (Lillet or Noilly Prat) in a martini - wouldn't that be a "gin and french"?
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Old 06-16-2014, 08:16 PM   #5
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I never could develop a taste for a martini. I'll stick with my standard whiskey in a glass with ice.
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Old 06-16-2014, 08:23 PM   #6
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In bars I've worked in a vodka dry martini meant a martini made with vodka rather than gin. Presumably a "medium" vodka martini means not too dry ie more vermouth to vodka than a very dry martini.

I'm a bit of a philistine - I like mine with 2/3rd gin and 1/3rd vermouth and I prefer dry Cinzano rather than Martini vermouth. Never tried French vermouth (Lillet or Noilly Prat) in a martini - wouldn't that be a "gin and french"?
No idea, I got that from the link above. I don't drink martinis, I do like a gin and tonic every 3 months or so.
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Old 06-16-2014, 10:25 PM   #7
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No idea, I got that from the link above. I don't drink martinis, I do like a gin and tonic every 3 months or so.
I like to order a dry gin Martini if we go out, but I'm with you on a good gin and tonic every so often. They are so refreshing when it's hot. I had several at the "Crossing the Equator" party on the South American Cruise. A good time was had by all, me included.
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Old 06-16-2014, 10:31 PM   #8
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I don't care for martinis, but have to agree about a good gin and tonic with lime.
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Old 06-16-2014, 11:16 PM   #9
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Being more of a wine guy, I only rarely drink a martini. And when I do have a martini, I like it heavy on vermouth. Hard liquor and me just don't get along.

Someone introduced me to this recipe last year. It's made with an Oregon Vermouth called "Petal & Thorn". Tasty stuff.

Heart of Bond Martini
  • 3 parts Petal & Thorn Vermouth
  • 1.5 parts "Navy-strength" Gin (I like Perry's Tot, but substitute your favorite)
  • 1 part Vodka
Serve up with a slice of lemon peel
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Old 06-17-2014, 02:15 AM   #10
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I prefer a Gin Martini, and I'm with MC. I like 2 parts gin to 1 part vermouth, and I like it "shaken not stirred" ;). With 3 olives. Now having said that I did have a sample of a new Vodka yesterday at a fundraiser. It was made from, get this....Quinoa! It was extremely smooth and didn't have any of that "burning throat" feeling that vodka often has. I would probably drink a Martini made with that!
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