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Old 08-18-2005, 02:10 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I keep a box (yes box) of Franzia Chablis in my cabinet specifically for cooking. I enjoy wine, but do not drink it often (I am more of a beer guy) and I don't always feel like buying a bottle just for a recipe. With the wine in the box I always have it on hand. Inside the box is a bag that the wine is in. It is airtight so the wine will stay good forever even after you open it. It has a pour spout so what I do is I keep it on a high shelf. When I need some for a recipe I open the cabinet and place a measuring cup under the pour spout and I am good to go.

I do not know much about wines so I don't know which types are dry by name. I do not think Chablis is terribly dry so I am sure there are better choices. I got that because that is what the store had. The recipes I use it in turn out great so I will continue to use it. The box holds 5 liters and probably cost me about 10-12 bucks so it is a great bargain.
LOL! I was just wondering how I could admit that I use the wine in a box for cooking. I don't like white wine and red makes me instantly sick ...so, I buy a box and it lasts for ever. I'm glad to see someone else uses it tool
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Old 08-18-2005, 02:15 PM   #22
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pds - I did a little experiment - I had an almost empty box of Chardonnay and I bought a new one - I tasted some of each (the old one was about 8 or 9 months old) and I could NOT distinguish any difference. They truly do last a long time!
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Old 08-18-2005, 03:07 PM   #23
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So correct me if I'm wrong.........I'm trying to learn more about cooking with wines. When a recipe calls for a Dry White Wine I should use only a.....Savg. Blac., Pinot, or Chardonnay? As these are the types of dry whites available?

Elf.....do you use your boxed wines no matter if the recipe say red wine or dry red wine......white wine or dry white wine? Or are they used for recipes strictly for ones that call for a dry wine?
I saw the boxed wines at the grocery store earlier.....they were 10.99 each. Next time I go to Wally World I'll see if I can pick them up cheaper. I did grab a bottle of Vendange Chardonnay while I was there. I'm making a shrimp scampi and it calls for dry white wine. I can't wait!
Thanks again everyone............I knew you all would help me out.
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Old 08-18-2005, 03:14 PM   #24
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There are a number of dry whites other than the ones you've mentioned. Those three are the most common by far. All "dry" means is 'not sweet'. So don't expect to see the words dry white wine on a label to guide you. The same is true of reds.

As jennyema said, California chardlnnays are oaky. That is, they are aged in oak barrels and pick up some of the wood flavor. If chardonnay is your choice, you could go for Australian chards. They tend not to be oaky.

If you like, you could buy a bottle of each and do a taste test. You can get inexpensive versions of all three that are quite good. Chardonnay is, by far, the most popular of them all.
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Old 08-18-2005, 03:35 PM   #25
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Thanks Andy M. I didn't see any Chardonnays at my store that weren't made in CA so I couldn't take jens advice on that. I do plan on trying other makers of Chardonnays to see which I prefer best though. Same as with the other types. Plus I was too cheap to pay the 10.99 for the boxed wine when I'm sure I can get that cheaper so I thought what the heck I'm treading in new territory anyway so I might as well start testing the waters.
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Old 08-18-2005, 04:18 PM   #26
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Look for Lindemann's Bin 65 Chardonnay. It should be less than $10 and is from Austarlia. It's consistently rated very good for taste and is not oaky.
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Old 08-18-2005, 04:59 PM   #27
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Thanks Andy.....I've put that down on my list.
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Old 08-19-2005, 09:46 AM   #28
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What Andy said.


I don't like the oaky taste of CA chardonnay's in my food, but that's just my personal preference. It's can also be a bit "buttery," which is ok when I am drinking it but when I am cooking I like a crisp and neutral flavor.

But you might like chardonnay.

Taste it and see.

Also, sometimes Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blancs are a bit cheaper because Americans tend to buy more chards.

But, as Andy says, Australian chards are not as oaky and are cheaper (usually) then french wines made from chardonnay grapes.
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Old 08-19-2005, 09:52 AM   #29
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SO's favorite is Australian Chard. If I'm going to drink white wine, I prefer Sauvignon Blanc. I also like it for cooking.

I keep a bottle of dry white vermouth on hand to cook with as well. If I need some wine in a dish and nothing appropriate is available, I use the vermouth. I always put a splash into a dish containing tomato. SO gets testy if I grab the wine glass out of her hand and empty it into the pot.
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Old 08-19-2005, 12:27 PM   #30
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Julia always recommended a dry vermouth as a good basic cooking white wine. It adds a depth of flavour. For reds I would go with a merlot or cabernet.

One reason to go with dry vermouth for cooking is the fact that it is fortified and herbed. It will last longer on your counter, and has some herb flavor that it will give to your food.
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