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Old 03-30-2006, 12:48 AM   #11
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I thought of another question during work today. Ok so I am in college and young...therefore I will be moving from place to place somewhat often. Is homebrewing more of a permanent thing or can I at least somewhat easily move the equipment around? Thanks!

brad
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Old 03-30-2006, 07:00 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Phantom of the Kitchen
I thought of another question during work today. Ok so I am in college and young...therefore I will be moving from place to place somewhat often. Is homebrewing more of a permanent thing or can I at least somewhat easily move the equipment around? Thanks!

brad
Oh yeah, it can be quite mobile. Especially if you're just doing extract brews, which takes away the need for all of the extra equipment for mashing grains and such. I'd definitely reccomend the plastic bucket fermenter route if you know you'll be moving. They tend to hold up to bumping and such a bit better than the glass carboys.

John
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Old 03-30-2006, 07:49 AM   #13
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OK I have a few more questions. I have seen the word carboy a lot in the past. What exactly is this? I think I have an idea, but I am not really sure.

Also, what is the best location in my house to brew? Does it smell? Does it do better in a cool dark environment? How much space do I need?

What is a good type of beer to start with for your first brew? Something that have a larger window for making mistakes that won't matter in the end as much.

Thanks guys. I have found this thread very informative!
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Old 03-30-2006, 08:27 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by GB
OK I have a few more questions. I have seen the word carboy a lot in the past. What exactly is this? I think I have an idea, but I am not really sure.

Also, what is the best location in my house to brew? Does it smell? Does it do better in a cool dark environment? How much space do I need?

What is a good type of beer to start with for your first brew? Something that have a larger window for making mistakes that won't matter in the end as much.

Thanks guys. I have found this thread very informative!
Hi GB,

A carboy is the glass jug that sits on top of water coolers (or plastic).



The best place at least to ferment, is a cooler, usually darker place. Fermenting beers don't like big temperature swings, and UV light can "skunk" a beer. I usually just cover the carboy with the box it came in.

For a first brew, a "bigger" flavored beer is more forgive. (From Pale Ale on up to porters and stouts) Probably the most difficult beer around to try to make, is what A-B and Miller put out. There is nowhere in those beers to hide off flavors.

John
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Old 03-30-2006, 08:35 AM   #15
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Thanks John. I was way off on what I though a carboy was. I thought it was something that fit into the top of the carboy actually.

OK so my basement under the stairs would probably be a good spot right? Or do I need to be able to get in there to do stuff?

I love stout so it is good to know that that would be a more forgiving type to start with!
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Old 03-30-2006, 09:59 AM   #16
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Basement under stairs sounds good for temperature stability, but remember this is five gallons of liquid. It is heavy. Best to put it where you can get to it easily and wrap it in a towel or t-shirt. Its going to have to sit in one place for a week or more, so out of traffic is good too.

Smell? Yes, a little. But it is a plesant aroma. If you graduate to all-grain brewing you will have that fantastic mashing aroma. In the beginning, you will have some aroma from the kit ingredients, but it is sweet and savory.

The fermentation cycle will produce CO2 gas which by itself is odorless (for all practical purposes) but the gas will have in it the wonderful aroma of Hops...

The sweet liquid that we make on the stove is called a mash. To balance the sweetness we add hops. Hops contribute two important things to our beer... bitterness, and aroma.
So, as the beer ferments... that is changes from mash to beer, it gives off CO2 and that smells wonderful!!

There are as many types and flavors of hops as there are spices in your cabinet. There are strong and pungent ones, and mild and sweet ones. How much you use and when in the cooking cycle you put them in all determines the final flavor.

As for stout... there may be other choices for your first brews, but you are right to stick with ales... confused yet? ... a stout is an ale, but to make a stout like a Guiness is a little tricky for a starting beer. Stick with a Pale Ale. Your Local homebrew store will have a kit for it.
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Old 04-02-2006, 09:46 AM   #17
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Boy Hopz, have you hit a nerve.

Many years ago was a chemist and shared a coach house with a roommate I worked with.

Worked long hours, but we decided to make beer.

Decided to jump right in, no extracts, and made the stuff from the malted grain.

First two batches were a stout and a pale ale, made at the same time.

Youth is fearless.

Came out surprisingly good. But then again we were chemists and knew how to follow a recipe.

Had a few more efforts before we went our separate ways.

Great stuff.

Have only made a few batches of wine since.

Have been meaning to try beer again.

Usually there are too many things to do to add another hobby, so think I will just try a kit with extracts. And there is a homebrew store only thirty miles or so away.

Thanks for posting, I needed a kick in the pants to get going again.
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Old 06-25-2006, 03:42 AM   #18
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I'm sorry I dug up this old thread, but I have an update

I just decided today that I am going to go the homebrew store in our city and pick up some things and get this homebrew business going for real. It was amazing to see my interest cumulate to what it is right now...it was exponential. I had a german bock at Old Chicago with my father and brother and I was just amazed. In the past two weeks I've been trying so many different, good beers and this bock was the deciding factor. Also one of my friends from work started homebrewing and he made some decent beer.

Homebrew ahoy! This is going to be a big step, but a fun one.

I will be able to call myself a brewmaster! yes!

So anyway, I'm not just raving about my passion for beer - I have a question. Are bocks an ok beer for a person new to homebrewing to make?

brad
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Old 07-17-2006, 07:50 PM   #19
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So anyway, I'm not just raving about my passion for beer - I have a question. Are bocks an ok beer for a person new to homebrewing to make?

brad
Hi Brad!

Sorry for the very late response, I haven't been around much, and hadn't had a chance to see this.

Bocks are lagers, and if you can't ferment it cool you can't really really make a "true" ne. You can, however, make it with a neutral ale yeast, and that will get you pretty close. If you have any questions, email me through my profile, and I'll see what I can answer.

John
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Old 11-27-2011, 05:03 PM   #20
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Wow! You are one lucky duck to find a 16 qt stockpot at the thrift store! How much was it anyways? Anyone else know of any websites on where to find cheap or used stockpots of that size?
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