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Old 09-18-2004, 10:11 PM   #1
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How to keep a cultured yeast???

I was wondering if it was possible and if it is, can you keep a cultured yeast indefinitly, or at least for a certain amount of time? This would be specifically for wine and beverages.

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Old 09-19-2004, 11:56 AM   #2
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Hmmm...while I would defer to many here with more scientific knowledge on the subject than I, I know that yeast (in any form-dry or wet) can only survive within a specific temperature range. I make bread a lot and carefully store my dry yeast sealed within a heavy ziploc (with as much air removed as possible) inside the freezer. I have successfully stored yeast for a year in my deep freeze, wrapped in freezer paper and similarly sealed within a ziplock. (Am actually using that batch now...)

I always portion out the amount of yeast I need at the time, return the remainder to the frezer, and allow the portioned amount to come to room temperature before using.

I also know that yeast, a living organism, has a finite lifespan. The longer it is stored, by any method, the more of it ages and dies. The stuff becomes less and less active. I use yeast so much and so often that my deep-frozen "backup supply" is usually not stored more that 3 or 4 months.

A colleague considers himself as a microbrew expert, having made very good ale for several years. He bought a vacuum sealer to store his portioned amounts of yeast, which he keeps in a tupperware container inside his refridgerator. He swears by the method and, as I said, his ale is good -- really good.
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Old 09-19-2004, 01:28 PM   #3
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yeast

Thanks Audeo,
That definitly helps. I have had my yeast in the refrigerator for 9 months now. I think I'll go get some new packets today.

I also have another question that hopefully you or someone might be able to answer as well.
I've heard some brewers talk about how if they have a good batch of yeast after making some beer they will scoop out the yeast out of the fermenter and save it for another batch. Does anyone know how this is done :?:
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Old 09-20-2004, 06:06 AM   #4
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The trub (clayish looking gunk) in the bottom of the fermenter is what they are talking about. I've never done it but know people who do (usually people trying to be *really* cheap). One of Charlie Papazians books goes over it, It's been years since I read it and I don't remeber much of it. Normally I just buy my yeast new each time.

I do not know the care for them but there are strains that are thousands of years old.
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Old 09-21-2004, 11:02 AM   #5
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Re: yeast

Quote:
Originally Posted by abjcooking
Thanks Audeo,
That definitly helps. I have had my yeast in the refrigerator for 9 months now. I think I'll go get some new packets today.

I also have another question that hopefully you or someone might be able to answer as well.
I've heard some brewers talk about how if they have a good batch of yeast after making some beer they will scoop out the yeast out of the fermenter and save it for another batch. Does anyone know how this is done :?:
Wyeast labs has a handy FAQ on this - it's referred to as yeast washing.
http://www.wyeastlab.com/hbrew/hbyewash.htm

You can also 'ranch' yeast using lab slants and agar medium - but it's a lot more involved.

John
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Old 10-05-2004, 02:22 PM   #6
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I know nothing about the yeast with which you make wines. I do know that I have bakers rapid rise yeast in my freezer that is 11 years old, and still going strong. I have a small container in my frige that I use from, regularly. It isn't vaccuum packed, but I do store it upside down.
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