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Old 01-01-2009, 04:43 PM   #1
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ISO food & beverage adjectives

How do I expand my beverage vocabulary? I've heard of a bunch of adjectives (besides salty, sweet, bitter & sour) like malty & hoppy, musky, earthy, floral, citrusy, crisp, syrupy, fruity, deep, thin, thick, one-dimensional, acidic, alcoholic, spicy, caramel, toffee, etc etc. What are some others? Maybe this list could include adjectves for stuff like teas, sakes, vinegars & cheeses also, not just wine & beer. Is there a sommelier textbook with stuff like this in it, or is it just experience & a lot of tasting that really expands someone's vocabulary?

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Old 01-05-2009, 02:06 PM   #2
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This may not be a perfect answer for you, but you might take a look at http://www.bjcp.org/docs/Beer_faults.pdf.

It has more to do with the causes and corrections of faults, but it does give a description of what some of the characteristics are for things like acidic, alcoholic, diacetyl, etc.

Hope it helps!
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Old 01-06-2009, 04:20 PM   #3
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watch a few episodes of nigella lawson's series and you'll learn a few thousand hahah
She uses the strangest words to describe things - i question whether most of them are actual words ;)
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Old 01-06-2009, 11:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronjohn55 View Post
This may not be a perfect answer for you, but you might take a look at http://www.bjcp.org/docs/Beer_faults.pdf.

It has more to do with the causes and corrections of faults, but it does give a description of what some of the characteristics are for things like acidic, alcoholic, diacetyl, etc.

Hope it helps!
that's a good one. I've seen diacetyl in beer reviews & I knew it was usually a bad thing. thx for the list
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