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Old 06-07-2006, 02:27 PM   #1
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Memento Torqui

This legend was on a tag hanging on the neck of a bottle of red wine I saw at Costco. It means, "Remember to Screw". It's a California winery's slogan promoting screw cap wines (excuse me, Stelvin Closure Wines). The tag also had a clever 6-step process toward the acceptance of cork free wines. The pitch is that corks in wine allow "cooties" into the wine while screw caps do not. Clever and maybe even true. We do know screw caps are cheaper than corks.

I couldn't resist the cleverness of the packaging so I bought a couple of bottles for $9.99 each. The wine is "Ca' del Solo" Big House Red, a blend of popular red varietals. It's a surprisingly good red table wine. Smooth and fruit forward with light tannins. Enjoyable and easy to drink as an 'everyday' wine.

For your edification check out the following websites:

Bonny Doon Vineyards

Death of the Cork
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Old 06-07-2006, 05:20 PM   #2
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Bonny Doon makes some very nice wines. Their Pacific Rim Riesling is very affordable and goes very well with Asian flavors and lighter European flavors (think poached Sea Bass in a Herb Nage). Their 2003 Syrah Le Pousseur is also nice and retails for about $18-23 a bottle. Great with lamb, venison, or a more savory veal or pork dish.
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Old 06-07-2006, 06:16 PM   #3
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I have to say that many of the Aussie wines I buy are sold without corks... not screw tops, though - just 'false' corks and I notice no deterioration in flavour. Have to admit, I'm partial to Aus and NZ wines - and would always choose them over Californian wines.

Still like French wines best, although when we were in Portugal earlier this year, I was pleasantly surprised at how much improved many of their wines were - not as cheap and nasty as in the past. This is because many of their new vintners are Aussies, NZealanders and S Africans!
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Old 06-07-2006, 06:33 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Have to admit, I'm partial to Aus and NZ wines - and would always choose them over Californian wines.
You know Izzy, I respect your posts and all but I gotta say to this one!

If you've ever seen the way some of those Aussie wines are produced (think mass production) you may change your mind. But to be fair, Aus and NZ do make excellent wines. I was referring to the garbage that is usually seen in supermarkets across the U.S. However, I do think the better California wineries (i.e. Caymus, Jordan, Heitz, etc.) would wipe the floor with the top Aus or NZ wines. They consistently win at nearly every wine competition around the world.

That's not to say that all California wines are superior because they do have many duds. My biggest gripe about California wines are that they've made Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay ubiquitous. Most of them are so oaky and big that most people I don't think even know what a good one should taste like.

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Originally Posted by Ishbel
Still like French wines best
Okay, you've redeemed yourself with this one. Please pour me a glass of the Louis Jadot Clos Vougeot Grand Crus.
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Old 06-07-2006, 06:40 PM   #5
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Ironchef.... I have visited many Australian wineries... I take issue with you about their wines! As for New Zealand. Their Marlborough wines, with the distinctive taste of gooseberries... YUM... What they sell to the US is obviously different to the stuff they send to us. I would consistently put them in my top favourite wines.

We go to France about once a year. Visit a number of Chateau vineyards. Buy by the case. We've bought some spectacularly AWFUL wines, but also some sublime.

I love Mercier champagne. You don't see it much in wine departments, but I highly recommend it. We buy about 4 cases each time we visit.

I forgot to say, wine choice is a very subjective thing..... For instance, I have never met a German wine that I've liked...
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Old 06-08-2006, 11:29 PM   #6
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I drink a lot of California wines, some French and some Australian.

I don't care for California Chards as they are often oaky (oakey?) and I prefer non-oaky chards.

I'm guessing the cork/fake cork will pass and be replaced by the screw cap over time. It's more efficient and less expensive. After all, the first thing you do is remove the closure and toss it into the trash!
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Old 06-09-2006, 12:58 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Andy M.
I don't care for California Chards as they are often oaky (oakey?) and I prefer non-oaky chards.
Andy, you should try drinking some white Burgundys if you haven't already.
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Old 06-09-2006, 01:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
What they sell to the US is obviously different to the stuff they send to us.
It depends on where you live, and what kinds of wine selections and/or vendors are available to you, or to the stores that you shop at.

They do have some pretty good Aus. and NZ wines at some chain supermarkets but most people wouldn't know enough about them to buy them. Many of those stores then stop stocking those wines once they do sell out simply because they don't move fast enough.

To get the better quality wines, you'd have to go a store that specializes in wines from around the world.
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Old 06-09-2006, 03:39 AM   #9
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Hmmmm, then our supermarkets would be a revelation to you, IC! We have wines from all round the world (yes, including California!) with a huge range of prices. Perhaps we're a bit more 'open' to trying wines from different places. My husband loves wines from Chile and Argentina at the moment. Very reasonably priced and full of flavours.
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Old 06-09-2006, 04:48 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
My husband loves wines from Chile and Argentina at the moment. Very reasonably priced and full of flavours.
South American wines can be pretty good. I've had several that were outstanding. I've noticed that they do better with bigger reds like Cabernet Sauvignons, Merlots, Syrahs, Malbecs, and Riojas. I've tasted other reds like Zinfandels, Pinot Noirs, Grenaches, and Sangioveses from South America and to me, they didn't have the complexity and the flavor spectrum as the other types of grapes. It could be that they needed to be aged more, or perhaps they needed something extra during the blending process.

The one thing that I don't particularily care for in South American wines is that some of their reds tend to have a high amount of acid. The problem with this is that it's hit or miss: you won't know until you pop the bottle and depending on that level of acid, it makes it hard to pair and eat with some foods.
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