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Old 08-14-2008, 04:16 AM   #1
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Questions about a riesling

I've recently been given a bottle of Blue Nun Riesling of a 2005 vintage. After opening it and taking a whiff, I was surprised at how pungent it was. Is this normal in Rieslings? I don't have much experience with this variety and it smells slightly wrong here. It's a screw cap, and the label states that sulphur has been added, but I'm not sure if this is normal or not. My limited knowledge tells me that this bottle smells of peaches, toast and this strange unidentified pungent smell. The taste seems ok, but the pungent smell sits around the middle of the nose when tasting. Any thoughts?

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Old 08-14-2008, 04:53 AM   #2
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Hi,

I don't think a Riesling would normally be described as having a pungent smell. It is a fruity white wine and should smell as such, maybe a bit lemony. The fact that the label notes that sulfites have been added, needn't alarm you, unless you have an allergy to these (some people do). All wines contain sulfites and a bit more is sometimes added to stop the fermentaiton processs.

Since you've already opened the bottle and the first sip was good, you've probably continued on your way since posting, and now know better than I could ever say if the wine is good or not. Santé!
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Old 08-14-2008, 04:55 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply :) Indeed I was sipping away at the wine, but I can't really get over this smell. It's definitely something pungent and not fruit related. I'm quite undecided if I should take it back to the store it was bought from or not :P
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Old 08-14-2008, 06:50 AM   #4
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I don't know, Zzinged.....Blue Nun is a popular brand....some stores might be kind and take it back but if you're like me I don't think I could put my hands on a receipt esp. if you bought it awhile back......but if it tastes funny, and smells funny, then it quacks like a dud.....take it back.......I don't know what your budget is but maybe you can ask someone at the store to help you decide or go online for ratings.....just type in good Reislings in a certain dollar range and see what comes up......
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Old 08-14-2008, 08:54 AM   #5
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Thanks for the reply :) Indeed I was sipping away at the wine, but I can't really get over this smell. It's definitely something pungent and not fruit related. I'm quite undecided if I should take it back to the store it was bought from or not :P

If you do take it back make sure you do it before the bottles empty ... L

Could temp abuse have caused this?
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Old 08-14-2008, 09:30 AM   #6
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Does it smell like vinegar or acetone? It can be slightly "off" - it won't be corked since it is a screw cap. A corked bottle would smell musty like an attic or basement. It could very well be temperature abuse or just an off bottle. You should definitely not be offended by the smell.
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Old 08-14-2008, 04:31 PM   #7
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And it could be just that that particular note in the nose is how it's supposed to be. A lot depends on the winemaker; not all of the same varietal will have the same nose or flavor. For example, Oregon Pinots and Pinots from the Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez region have different characteristics. If the flavor is off, then that's one thing. But if the nose is different, and the flavor is fine, then don't worry about it. The only way to really see is to buy another bottle of the exact same wine.
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Old 08-14-2008, 05:04 PM   #8
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Zinged, have you tried Reislings before? It's a little too fruity and sweet for my tastes. If you prefer drier wines you may just no like that varietal.
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Old 08-14-2008, 05:12 PM   #9
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Zinged, have you tried Reislings before? It's a little too fruity and sweet for my tastes. If you prefer drier wines you may just no like that varietal.
There are many very dry Reislings out there. It's a common misconception that that grape produces sweet wine.

That said, Blue Nun is pretty sweet. Or was. I haven't had it for many years.
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Old 08-14-2008, 09:11 PM   #10
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There are many very dry Reislings out there. It's a common misconception that that grape produces sweet wine.
Alsatian Rieslings tend to be much more dry than their German counterparts. Cali Rieslings are a bit on the dryer side too, I believe.
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