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Old 04-07-2006, 01:14 PM   #11
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"if you don't like it"..... many meanings. It' s possible it is turning vinegar (!!) and you have all the rights to send it back. May be it is flavoring of cork, and you have all the rights to send it back. But may be too that you have ordered a particular bottle, and that bottle has not the right taste. A bad year, or a bad conservation....many reasons. If it is a common wine, I think you can only tell it gently, and HOPE they change (generally they do so). But, if the bottle is a very special one, 60-80-100 euro, f.i. you have the same rights. Of course, here it's necessary you are effectively a good expert of wines.....And much depends by the restaurant level.
I remembere a girfriend of mine, absolutely ignorant about wines. Her boyfriend used to leave her the job to taste wine, for joke. She had no experience at all, so decided to always have this behaviour:
She rounded the wine in the glass, looked at it against light, tasted just a bit of wine, glanced at it with a very suspicious face, and always was saying the same words: "Oh...well...I was sure it was...softer, but...well...ok!"
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Old 04-07-2006, 01:25 PM   #12
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The reason you test a glass is to make sure it's not "corked." Some corks will turn a bottle because of trichloroanisole contamination. You can smell it. It's kind of musty and off smelling without the normal fruit smells you would experience.

If a bottle is light struck, sulphidic, over-sulphured (a preservative that can be overused), acetic, oxidized (madeurised) or fermented past the point of being good you would also be able to note this with the taste and/or smell as well. If it is sulphidic you can actually decant, drop a clean/sanitized copper coin in and wait. It will react with the sulphide and eventually eliminate the rotten egg smell you'll get from sulphidic wines.

It's *extremely* bad form to send it back just because you don't *like* the taste. There should be a valid reason, and not everybody is able to detect the difference. I rarely can detect a bad bottle.
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Old 04-07-2006, 01:32 PM   #13
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A corked wine (or another obvious flaw/defect) is the only reason I would ever consider sending back a wine. Of course, flavour wise, I don't recall ever meeting a wine I really didn't care for.

I'm actually usually really good at picking out wines that are corked (or in the process of turning corked). I bought a cheap batch of corks for some homemade wine a while back, and ended up getting a LOT of practice at recognizing the various stages or 'corked' wine. The blue cheese looking mold that can form on the end of the cork is usually, but not always, another good sign that something may be amiss.

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Old 04-07-2006, 01:46 PM   #14
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I've met several wines I don't care for. I can't *stand* sweet wines. The drier the better, afaiac, much like I prefer bitter beers. If I want grape juice, I'll buy Welch's. ;)
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Old 04-07-2006, 02:18 PM   #15
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phinz...

every wine, and every beer has it's place, and time.

if you've ever been out backpacking, and all you have left (or find ) is skunky beer, and you're miles from civilization, you will savor every rotten drop.

i used to dislike sweet red wines, until i had a really good homemade sweet red, served in large italian ceramic water pitchers at a local restaurant. i guess i had such a good time there that it changed my perception.
it was a little mom and pop place that never seemed to be busy. the owners were always there, sitting at a table near the front. they always recommended one of the specials, which were always fantastic. veal chops valdostana, zuppa di pesce, calamari affogati over squid ink pasta, grilled swordfish with a garlic lemon sauce, osso bucco... so many great ones.
but the wine, served in those really cool painted pitchers seemed to fit every dish, as it was part of the whole experience.
we'd kill a pitcher, sometimes two , and finish everything off with an espresso, and a delicate sweet dessert.

so now, if i'm in the mood for one, or end up with a sweet homemade red from a neighbor, i decant it into a ceramic pitcher and enjoy.
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Old 04-07-2006, 02:45 PM   #16
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I have a bottle of homemade muscadine wine in the fridge. It's been there for over a year, and will probably be there for several more.
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Old 04-07-2006, 02:47 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phinz
I've met several wines I don't care for. I can't *stand* sweet wines. The drier the better, afaiac, much like I prefer bitter beers. If I want grape juice, I'll buy Welch's. ;)
AMEN phinz!
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Old 04-07-2006, 04:27 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
He took a sip and said it was awful and sent it back and then picked another wine. The waiter brought another bottle over and poured a taste. The guy did the same thing. Said it was disgusting and sent it back just to pick another new bottle.
I would truly be afraid of the additives that ended up in his meal that night. I worked with a guy that sent everything back every time (and always rudely). When I had the misfortune of eating with him, I would try to alert the waiter before we ordered and make sure he got a big tip.
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Old 04-07-2006, 04:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Keep in mind that whatever you reject at the table goes to the kitchen
If it's food, it get's dumped. If it's wine, we either use it for cooking or try to sell it off by the glass within a couple of days of the bottle being opened.
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Old 04-07-2006, 06:05 PM   #20
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I'm not expert yet, though i hope to be one day, but If you are very familiar with the wine produced by a certain grape, and somthing is definitely off, is it appropriate to send it back? It's not really the restaurants fault, but should you have to drink a wine that tastes like a Riesling ( generally sweeter) when you order a Chablis ( generally dryer)?
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