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Old 06-24-2005, 10:34 AM   #1
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Un-aged Scotch?

Is there such a thing as un-aged scotch, or scotch you can buy and let age? My dad is a scotch fan and over the years has kept three good bottles for special occasions--when I graduated from college, when I got married and when he retires. DH and I would like to get him a bottle to celebrate him becoming a grandpa for the first time this fall that can age for 21 years--so someday he can share a drink with his grandchild.

What should we be looking for?

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Old 06-24-2005, 12:49 PM   #2
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I don't know about US whiskies, or even Irish ones, but
any Scottish single malt whisky is already 'aged' before you get it. The 'youngest' is usually about 10 years old.

My husband's favourites are Bowmore, Strathisla and Highland Park.

Whiskies like Johnny Walker are blended whiskies.
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Old 06-24-2005, 01:02 PM   #3
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I don't know much about scotch, but I believe the aging process imparts the flavors from the wood barrels into the scotch. Once it is bottled it is not really aging anymore. It is getting older, but not aging.
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Old 06-24-2005, 01:42 PM   #4
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yep, scotch does not age in the bottle. i wish it did. i have several bottles that i found when i refinished the basement that my fil stashed away. they had been hidden for at least 25 years. i asked some scotch afficianados at work about it, and all they said it still only rates by the age on the label, but that i should bring it in for them to test.
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Old 06-24-2005, 02:17 PM   #5
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Shows you how much I know! Thanks everyone!
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Old 06-24-2005, 04:07 PM   #6
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My advice would be to work out what type of whisky (we don't call it Scotch - after all, there IS only one whisky....
he likes. It would be so easy to make a mistake. Islay malts have an astringent, some say sea-weedy note.

Scots single malt whiskies are all very different in taste. The highland malts, the Speyside malts, the island malts and the island malts (from Islay, like Bowmore) all have very different characteristics. My husband loves a 'dram' but doesn't like, for instance, the MacAllan or Laphroaig. My Dad adored Laphroaig and didn't like Strathisla....
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Old 06-24-2005, 06:18 PM   #7
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Buckytom is, as usual, correct. Whisky is not like wine, once out of the cask it does not age in the bottle, or at least that is what I have read and been told.

And I do like a wee dram of single malt, and fancy the Islay malts (love Laphroaig). Also Tallisker, while not an Islay malt, is also a favorite.

PA, your fil can put away a bottle for 21 years, but it seems it will be no different than when it was bottled.

Sorry.

But why not get him a bottle of his favorite to celebrate the birth of his grandchild?

Just an idea. Congratulations.
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Old 06-26-2005, 12:55 PM   #8
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Laghavouhlin (or some such spelling) is also a fine Islay malt. and Glen Farclas cask strength (100 proof) is a very fine Highland. But one of the joys of malt wiskey is trying a new one when you can't one you're familiar with. Making a new friend is always nice, eh?
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Old 06-26-2005, 05:24 PM   #9
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Lagavulin!

And Scots' whiskies are always whisky without an 'e' - Irish and American with an 'e'....
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Old 06-26-2005, 06:50 PM   #10
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There are many whiskies out there including single malts (aged for various times), pure malts, those from independent bottlers, and blended whiskies, among others.

Some, and many would argue all, are an acquired taste. IMHO, those from Islay generally require a bit of getting used to, particularly Lagavulin, which I do enjoy (and have about half a bottle of the 16 year old about 20 feet away).

The single malts are fairly dear, at least where I live (VA), although we can get a reasonable variety in the state run liquor stores.

Would certainly want to know what dad fancies before making a purchase.

Oh, heck, the sun is over the yardarm and this whisky talk is making me thirsty.

Nice to see a whisky thread here.
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