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Old 02-26-2008, 05:07 PM   #21
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Okay so what about gin? I've never heard of a sweet gin.
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:09 PM   #22
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All gin is dry, you're right.

But there is a particular type of gin called "London Dry." That's why you might see the word "dry" on the label.

Gin drinks can be dry or not, depending on what else you add to them.

Gin is the trendy new alcohol.
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:12 PM   #23
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Hmmm... so why does a dry martini have less vermouth in it even though it is dry vermouth to begin with... ?
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:18 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crankin View Post
Hmmm... so why does a dry martini have less vermouth in it even though it is dry vermouth to begin with... ?
Yes.

Some dry martinis only have the vermouth bottle waived above it. I like my martinis with the vermouth added to the ice, shaken, vermouth dumped, gin added, shaken and poured.

Also, dry vermouth still is a somewhat sweet, though not as sweet as sweet vermouth.
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:37 PM   #25
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It is my understanding that any vermouth drink that uses dry vermouth is called 'dry' while those that use sweet vermouth are usually called 'sweet'.

A dry martini calls for dry vermouth (and have never heard of a sweet gin or vodka martini). But then some folks decided that less vermouth might be tastier and called those very dry martinis. Yep, and now some folks ignore the vermouth altogether, although to me that is just a glass of gin.
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:40 PM   #26
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And remember, let your taste be your guide with all foods and beverages. before I had a religeous reason to stop drinking alcoholic beverages (including wines), I tried for four years to "develop a taste" for them. In my 21rst year, I finally realized that I was drinking alcoholic beveerages because of peer pressure. I enjoyed niether the flavor not the feelings that went with drinking them, including drinking in moderation.

We all have different tastes we like and dislike. If you ahve no reason to not drink wines, then by all means, try them and determine what you like and dislike. But if you find that the flavor is not good for you, then don't let society, or peer pressure dictate to you what you should and shouldn't be drinking.

I choose to believe in a faith that is alcohol free. But I quit drinking alcoholic beverages long before I joined that faith, or even knew what it was.

The only exception for me was one time when I pan-fried a pork chop until mostly cooked through, added 2 tbs. Sherry, and covered to finish them. They were quite tasty. But truly, that was the only instance where I could stomach the flavor of any alcoholic beverage.

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Old 02-26-2008, 05:41 PM   #27
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Jeekinz hit the nail on the head. It is the opposite of sweet. The drier the wine the more it will make your mouth pucker.
oh pucker power huh?
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Old 02-26-2008, 09:19 PM   #28
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In terms of alcoholic beverages, Dry is a term used to describe the residual sugars (Specific gravity, brix, etc) and other elements that combine in the finish of a drink.

For example, a pale ale when unhopped may be quite sweet. The bitterness from the hops (a combination of tannins and alpha acids) helps "dry" it out.

A "dry" gin will have a lower residual sugar/more pronounced spicing mix to it.

The "pucker factor" (Anyone remember those old Keystone Bitter Beer Face Commercials?) is often a side effect, but not quite the same thing. ;)

And now back to the shadows I go!
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Old 02-27-2008, 12:11 AM   #29
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If it makes your mouth pucker (removes saliva) doesn't that mean it's Bitter?

My understanding is..
Bitter = removes saliva
Sour = makes you salivate
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Old 02-27-2008, 08:28 AM   #30
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Lemon makes you pucker, but I would not call lemon bitter.
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