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Old 09-01-2006, 09:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
Forgot about my Noilly Prat - this is just about all I use for white wine called for in recipes. The bottle is kept with my oils/vinegars and so very handy and does not go bad.
I also tend to use dry white vermouth when white wine is called for. Julia Child gave me that idea. She liked it best because it has so many herb flavors already incorporated, and it keeps so much longer than "regular" wine.

The wine you see in supermarkets labeled "Cooking Wine" is not only full of salt, but also is made from the cheapest plonk you could possibly imagine. There are so many really drinkable inexpensive wines available, even in the grocery store wine sections,, and they ALL cost less per ounce than that "Cooking Wine" swill.

"Dry red wine," to answer the original question, is just about any red wine you see on the shelves in US today. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Beaujolais, Zinfandel, Syrah/Shiraz all qualify. However, Cabernet Sauvignon generally is not a good choice for cooking with because of its tannins, that, when reduced, can taste downright awful. The wines I use most often tend to be Cote du Rhones (a blend of Grenache and other red grapes) Pinot Noir or Beaujolais. and, just as the recommendation is not to cook with a wine you wouldn't drink, I also recommend to cook with less expensive wines. For instance, if you've splurged on an expensive Bordeaux to serve for a special dinner, don't cook with THAT! Instead, choose an under $10 bottle of Merlot, approximating the taste, without the expense. I wouldn''t cook with any wine that cost more than $15.....
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Old 09-11-2006, 09:34 AM   #12
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Thanks everyone
You guys are so nice to help me out! I did buy a bottle of Vermouth .
I wanted to know on the the dry red wines. what kind of brand is good to use . And im not really into cooking with dry red wines , so i was wondering what brand you guys use.
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Old 09-11-2006, 09:42 AM   #13
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You won't find a dry red wine like vermouth that's fortified so it will keep in the cupboard. I'd recommend a merlot as they are low in tannins, inexpensive and everywhere. You can divide the wine up into ice cube trays or other small containers and freeze them for future use.

You should be able to find a decent merlot for around $10 a bottle. You can also use any other red wines. Ask your local wine merchant for a low cost dry red for cooking.
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Old 09-12-2006, 09:58 AM   #14
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For a red that can be kept over time, you might try a boxed red wine. These keep quite a while.
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Old 09-12-2006, 10:35 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katherine47
Thanks everyone
You guys are so nice to help me out! I did buy a bottle of Vermouth .
I wanted to know on the the dry red wines. what kind of brand is good to use . And im not really into cooking with dry red wines , so i was wondering what brand you guys use.
For "wines to cook with," I generally purchase Chilean or Australian wines... my favorites being Banrock Station Shiraz or Cab/Shiraz, and Concha y Toro Cab/Merlot. These are often found in the wine section of grocery stores in US. I don't buy Yellow Tail.....
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Old 09-12-2006, 10:39 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs
For a red that can be kept over time, you might try a boxed red wine. These keep quite a while.
Jean's right! I rarely buy those because at my house we usually drink what we've cooked with.

Lots of restaurants keep box wine in the walkin all the time!
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Old 09-12-2006, 10:46 AM   #17
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Australia produces good wines, but my favorite is Spain. There reds are dry but still maintain a fruit forward taste. Wines I would reccomend are Crianza, Garnache ( Grenache in English) and the Tempranillos. They are relativley inexpensive ( under $10). I must be a drunk though because I need alot more than 1 bottle if I'm cooking with it and inviting friends over.
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Old 09-12-2006, 11:28 AM   #18
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I must be a drunk though because I need alot more than 1 bottle if I'm cooking with it and inviting friends over.
I doubt that! There are 5 to 6 "glasses" of wine (6 oz) in a 750 ml bottle... So, say you are using a cup in your stew, or to reduce... maybe even more... not much left for the cook and friends! unless you bought a magnum!

That wouldn't qualify you as a "drunk," unless you are alcohol sensitive!
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Old 09-13-2006, 05:14 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katherine47
Thanks everyone
You guys are so nice to help me out! I did buy a bottle of Vermouth .
I wanted to know on the the dry red wines. what kind of brand is good to use . And im not really into cooking with dry red wines , so i was wondering what brand you guys use.
others have mentioned the varieites of grapes used, so i'll try to give a few pointers on brands
if you're looking at wines in the u.s., you probably can't go wrong if the wine is coming from the napa valley area. as a general rule, the more specific the label is as to where it's from, the higher the likelyhood that it's a good wine. if it's from a town, such as st. helena, calistoga, rutherford, etc., it's probably a very nice wine. if it's from napa or sonoma county or says california north coast, it's probably good. if it's labeled simply as california, you're taking your chances. if it's from southern cal, you'd be better off to pass on it. it's too sunny down there and the grapes are too big and sweet.

another clue is how specific it is on stating which varieties of grapes are used.

a couple of the larger vinters that would probably be available in most any area would be robert mondavi & beaulieu vinyards. just about any wine they bottle will be fine for cooking or everyday use. beringer, sutter (creek? hill?), & rutherford hill are a few others. of course, there are a bazillion small vinters that make great wines, not only in northern cal, but the whole west coast and here and there around the u.s., but the above are widely available and pretty reliably good for most occasions for your average joe or katherine.
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Old 09-13-2006, 05:23 AM   #20
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My favorite for "every day" cooking & drinking is Inglenook Cabernet. Don't get me wrong, I'll buy other reds of all sorts (I prefer Itallian reds for price & flavor). But as a general rule on weekends you'll find a big 3-liter bottle of Inglenook on my kitchen counter, and definitely when I'm having a large party. I'm almost embarrassed when I decant it and someone asks me what it is and have to 'fess up (next thing I know, I'm at their house and there's that familar bottle). My sis even bought me glasses that said "cheap red wine" on them. I like boxed whites OK, but the reds are never dry enough for me. So I buy the Inglenook, and 3 liters is enough that there's plenty for guests after I've put a cup or so into the food, then had a glass or two while cooking. If your guests are the "one glass with dinner" types, it comes in 1 1/2 liter size too. My guests are more drinkers than that.
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