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Old 06-09-2012, 10:47 AM   #11
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I live in Quebec and a fair amount of cider is produced here. So, I have always hoped for some that was good. The stuff I have tasted seems to have potential, I hate to say it, it just doesn't taste very good. One of these days I'll get someone knowledgeable to recommend some local cider.

There must be some that's good, the locally made ice cider was really good.
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Old 06-09-2012, 11:50 AM   #12
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My cider IQ is just about nil. Sadly, there doesn't seem to be a lot of cider produced in the US anymore, at least not commercially. In colonial times, it was an immensely popular beverage, but fell out of favor in the latter half of the 19th century as beer and bourbon became the drink of choice. I've had cider on occasion, but don't like to hang around with people who drink too much of it as they have a tendency to become mule-headed. More so than beer, which often results in a sleepy drunk.

Incidently, there is an interesting historical footnote from the American perspective. You may hear the phrase "hard cider" bandied about in the US. The reason for this is because during the dark days of prohibition, the cider mills had to stay afloat, so they sold the unfermented juice as "soft" or "sweet" cider. Soon it was just called cider, for short. The name stuck and the drink became very popular. So much so, that when prohibition was repealed they had to come up with a new name for the alcoholic brew. Thus, "hard cider" was born.

In the US, "cider" usually refers to raw, unfermented and unfiltered apple juice. It's a cloudy liquid with a lot of pulp.

Apple juice is filtered and pasteurized. It's typically considered a children's drink.

Hard cider (though occasionally, you still may see "cider" by itself) normally refers to the fermented beverage.

None of these are had and fast rules, however. You'll see many instances where the lines are muddied.
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Old 06-09-2012, 12:36 PM   #13
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I know that my shoulder/butt mop, in which cider is the greatest portion of liquid, turns out some mighty fine pulled pork.
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Old 06-09-2012, 12:36 PM   #14
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I've made cider with a friend. It's hard work with the hand turned press, but the end product was quite good!

Other than that, and the occasional roadside stand cider, that's about it for me.
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Old 06-10-2012, 03:51 AM   #15
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Love what we Yanks call hard Cider, but Steve is right its hard to come by here. I drink it when I am in Canada and especially like the draught version. Make mine extra dry.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:42 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Buon Giorno Harry,

I love historical facts and details about food products and thus, this post is phenomenal ...

Have enjoyed the trivia very much. Have a lovely wkend with Bolas and his lady.

Interesting about the UK Christening Ceremonies ...

I had known about the Scurvy amongst sailors ... using citrus and apples which have some varieties which are very acidic and thus, employed to cure this illness.

Ciao, Margi.

Ciao,
Margi.
trivia?love it too margi.i drive bolas & madge bonkers with it.it was the vitamin c in apples/citrus that cured scurvy but the sailors didn't know that.the yanks call us "limey's" due to the daily lime juice ration british sailors were given to ward off scurvy.apparently the nickname originated in the caribbean.
john evelyn was right all those years ago about it's medicinal properties.bolas drinks apple cider vinegar diluted in water to help dissolve his kidney stones.
as oscar wilde said "it is a very sad thing that nowadays there is so little useless information"
ben schott's original miscellany is my bible!
harry
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:58 AM   #17
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Quote:
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My cider IQ is just about nil. Sadly, there doesn't seem to be a lot of cider produced in the US anymore, at least not commercially. In colonial times, it was an immensely popular beverage, but fell out of favor in the latter half of the 19th century as beer and bourbon became the drink of choice. I've had cider on occasion, but don't like to hang around with people who drink too much of it as they have a tendency to become mule-headed. More so than beer, which often results in a sleepy drunk.

Incidently, there is an interesting historical footnote from the American perspective. You may hear the phrase "hard cider" bandied about in the US. The reason for this is because during the dark days of prohibition, the cider mills had to stay afloat, so they sold the unfermented juice as "soft" or "sweet" cider. Soon it was just called cider, for short. The name stuck and the drink became very popular. So much so, that when prohibition was repealed they had to come up with a new name for the alcoholic brew. Thus, "hard cider" was born.

In the US, "cider" usually refers to raw, unfermented and unfiltered apple juice. It's a cloudy liquid with a lot of pulp.

Apple juice is filtered and pasteurized. It's typically considered a children's drink.

Hard cider (though occasionally, you still may see "cider" by itself) normally refers to the fermented beverage.

None of these are had and fast rules, however. You'll see many instances where the lines are muddied.
ah hah,interesting stuff steve.down in somerset,which is a massive cider producing area in the south west they call the cloudy cider "scrumpy".bolas & i grew up in the country & when we "raided" the local farmers orchards it was called "scrumping" when we were caught it was called " a beating!!"
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:08 AM   #18
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My father used to put down a barrel of cider each year and he believed that the best hard cider was made with half apple and half pear juice. To get the process started he added raisins, rye whiskey, oatmeal and honey. He would decide when it was ready to drink by the number of bubbles coming through the airlock hose into a jar of water. It was always clear and quite potent. Any that was not used eventually turned to vinegar and then it was turned over to my Mother and my Grandmother for cooking.

You and Bolas should give it a try this fall!
flippin' 'eck auntie,cider & rye whiskey combo? i think "fall" is the operative word there..........!
sadly,the old apple & pear trees in the garden stopped producing a few years ago so we felled them & split the logs for the fireplace & barbeque...smell wonderful!
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:08 PM   #19
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Harry,

Yes, I had heard that expression in the Caribbean, Lime-ies ...

I do like Cider, however, there are so many types:

1. Asturian Natural Still - 5% alcohol
2. Asturian Sparkling - 5% alcohol
3. Asturian Sparkling in the same style as Cava, and aged in oak barrels and has the same alcoholic content as a Cava ...
4. French: Calvados is considered an apple brandy ( digestivi, cordial )

*** Plus numerous other French Normandy DOC varieties ...

So, enjoy ...
Margi.
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