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Old 05-26-2006, 09:24 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Click here for info on fortified wine.

As for the cooking wine, get your mom to get rid of it if you can and have her try using regular wine. Cooking wine is LOADED with salt. IMO the only thing it is good for is clearing ice off your front porch. Have her try using regular wine just once to compare any see which dish comes out better.
This is another thing I didn' know. What is this wine? Added with SALT? Where can I find some informations more? Not because I want to use it....But I like horror films
GB, I've read the article you have linked. I must say it contains some wrong news. In Marsala, as in every italian wine, no sugar is allowed. Till some years ago (I don't know if now too, if there is someone from France, please, correct me, if necessary....), there has been a wine war between France and Italy, and the reason was exactly this. In France, adding sugar was allowed, in Italy no. So, if a year , in France, might happen they have a particular bad production, they were able to add sugar to encrease alcool levels. For us, this was not possible.
I give you an example. In Italy, there is a wine produced in a little amount in Cinque Terre, in LIguria. Wine Sciacchetrà, 4000 bottles a year. It's produced with dried grapes, and it needs about (if I remember well) ten-12 kilos grapes to have 1 lt wine. It's a "fortified" one (about 17 degrees), but absolutely no sugar is allowed, as nothing more than grapes.
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:30 AM   #12
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RDG thank you for pointing out the wrong facts in that link. I have to confess I did not read the entire article so I am glad you pointed that out!

Yes cooking wine is a horror. In the US it is sold in Supermarkets. If I am not mistaken, they put the salt in so that it is not consumable by itself. That way they can sell it in supermarkets that do not allow the sale of alcohol. I could be wrong about that though so hopefully someone will come along and either confirm or deny that.
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:35 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
. If I am not mistaken, they put the salt in so that it is not consumable by itself. That way they can sell it in supermarkets that do not allow the sale of alcohol. .
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:36 AM   #14
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My thoughts exactly RDG
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Old 05-26-2006, 10:27 AM   #15
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PA Baker: I only cook with frozen wine. Never occured to drink it But maybe I will sometime.

RDG Here is more info about cooking wine than you want to know ...
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Old 05-26-2006, 10:58 AM   #16
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TY, Jennyema, I've read......
I could never imagine something similar could exist....My God...Wine with SALT.....
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Old 05-26-2006, 03:38 PM   #17
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Hi aaron-k, to answer your question about fortified wine it is wine to which alcohol has been added, perhaps in the form of a distilled alcoholic concoction, such as a brandy (that has a relatively high alcohol content).

When one normally makes wine they add yeast to the grape juice and let it ferment (it will do so from the natural yeast, but one usually prefers a yeast that gives a better flavor).

Eventually it stops fermenting (making alcohol) when the alcohol level gets high enough to kill the yeasts (usually about ten percent alcohol or so). Yeast are lousy environmentalists and they pollute their environment until they die. That is NOT a political statement.

But the level of alcohol in 'regular' wine is not enough to stop bacterial growth, and 'regular' wines will go bad shortly (within hours to days) of opening.

Why anyone would ever let wine hang about that long is beyond us here, but some people apparently do.

Wines in casks are also subject to the same bacterial infestations.

To preserve wines, folks found that adding some more alcohol to the wine could make the product relatively immune to bacteria.

And so we have fortified wines that are generally labelled as sherry, port, Marsala, vermouth, or Madiera.

The alcohol level in those wines is often about 18 percent or so, enough to give the bacteria a fatal hernia, or something like that.

Those wines generally last for quite a long time after opening.

Both regular and fortified wines can be used for cooking, and both add different nuances to the food.

As far as cooking wine goes, they used to carry it in the supermarkets I worked in many years ago that could not legally sell wine.

And the other posters, as usual, are correct, it is wine with a whole bunch of salt, and was legal because no one on anything but a down and out bender would ever drink the stuff. Even then, most of those guys would drink after shave or mouthwash or other products that usually contained alcohols that caused far more damage than ethanol, and much more quickly. That is how lousy the cooking wine tasted, I suppose.

Anyway I hope this answers your question.
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Old 06-02-2006, 12:18 AM   #18
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Auntdot, thanks for your in depth answer.
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Old 06-02-2006, 12:42 AM   #19
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If it sat too long, and air was present,wouldnt it turn into vineager?

With some wines suger is added(mallalactic fermentation), but I have never heard of salt being added.?
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Old 06-02-2006, 08:33 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
...With some wines suger is added(mallalactic fermentation), but I have never heard of salt being added.?

Salt is added to the cooking wines sold in supermarkets. Holland House is one brand I've seen. This is done to make it undrinkable. It's often poor quality wine to begin with. The added salt just makes it not worth using.

It's a much better choice to buy fortified wine or good, reasonably priced wine and use that for cooking.
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