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Old 08-02-2006, 01:26 PM   #21
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What you said is consistent with the recommendations on a couple of coffee sites -- but conventional wisdom is often wrong. If you and I agree that freezing is OK, to heck with those guys!
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Old 08-02-2006, 01:31 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FryBoy
conventional wisdom is often wrong.
That is for sure!
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Old 08-02-2006, 01:33 PM   #23
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I drink my coffee black, and I prefer the French press... also love expresso, especially made with Illycafe. For "regular" coffee, I like Kenya coffee the best. usually buy it at Zabars. I like the way they roast their beans. I won't drink Starbucks coffee of any kind. Their beans always taste burnt to me. In France I like cafe au lait for breakfast. That's the only time I like anything in my ccffee!
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Old 08-02-2006, 09:58 PM   #24
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If you asked for "regular coffee" over here in Venezuela, you'd get a blank look.
No restaurant, deli, bakery, food hall, etc. here would be seen dead without an Italian Coffee Machine. Coffee is ground fresh, on the spot, everywhere. Milk is heated on the machine too. Espresso as it should be made, you might think - but think again.

You can have your coffee in any of the following ways ( the translations are a bit rough, but you'll get the idea):

Baby's Bottle (tetero) - very milky coffee, with just a splash of coffee and lots of frothy milk.
With milk (con leche) - milky coffee. About 1/4 coffee, 3/4 milk.
Brown (marrón) - half coffee, half milk. It's a deliciously strong cup of coffee.
Black (negro) - straight black coffee, but more watery than a
Short Black (negro corto) - which is an espresso.
Watery black (guayoyo) - for those who can't take the strong things in life!

Just to confuse things, you can ask for a "con leche oscuro" ( dark, milky coffee) or a "marrón claro" ( a light brown coffee). Believe me , there's a difference and clients will send it back if it's not just right.

Add to the complications that you can ask for it hot, warm, with just a splash of milk, more water, etc.

Venezuelan coffee is not exported much.
All the more for us!!
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Old 08-02-2006, 10:03 PM   #25
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cliveb, my mother has gone to do volunteer dental work in Venezula and she brought me back some coffee. It was excellent stuff. I hope so goes back some day so she can get me some more
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Old 08-03-2006, 12:43 AM   #26
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I drink Lavazza Decaf and it really sucks having a BP prob as too much caffeine aint good for it! (Id much prefer regular Lavazza but that is now reserved for a treat. )
Always prepared in an Italian Mocca, ( the 3 piece screw together, stove top one) and it is great.

Cannot abide coffee with additions unless it is a tot of brandy at evenings end.
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Old 08-03-2006, 02:19 AM   #27
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Okay, let's throw in my two cents' worth:

Every day I admit I drink one good cappucino, made fresh on our Rancilio espresso machine. My hubby's a pro and often he makes it for me, spoiled girl that I am!

However, even though it's a taste I've acquired over the past 20 years of living in Greece, a good cup of "Greek" coffee can be hard to beat, so much so that on my last trip to the States I carried some coffee and the requisite "brickie" (odd little saucepan affair) with me.

My understanding is that it's essentially the same as other coffees drunk in the Middle East: several spoonfuls of powdery coffee stirred into cold water in the "brickie" then the whole affair brought very carefully just to the point shy of boiling where a "head" of foam is raised, but it doesn't boil over (the mark of a good coffee maker is the quality of the foam). Then it's poured quickly into a little (espresso-size) cup and one waits for the grounds to settle.

The grounds in the bottom used to gross me out. Always reminded me why I don't like to swim in ponds. Now they don't bother me at all because the top liquid is as mild and pure as anything you could imagine. And the grounds? If you're in the village, you can always find an elderly local to tell your fortune from them!
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Old 08-03-2006, 07:28 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
...even though it's a taste I've acquired over the past 20 years of living in Greece, a good cup of "Greek" coffee can be hard to beat...!
One my fondest memories of Greece was the first cup of Greek coffee I ever tasted . I'd taken a bus ( yes, a bus!) from London to Athens, because I'd missed out on air flights. 3 days bouncing across Europe, and a 12 hour non-stop journey through (former) Yugoslavia.
We arrived at the border at 4.30am, just as the sun was breaking over the horizon. Everyone out! To the little coffee / pastry shop for a mind-blowing strong black coffee and a honey-laced pastry.
And that was 30 years ago - it's still clear in my mind!
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Old 08-03-2006, 07:57 AM   #29
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IMO, nothing beats a cup of coffee from freshly ground beans. I buy mine at the World Market and I usually get the Italian Roast, but this last time I got their Breakfast Blend. I especially love when we go camping and make our coffee in a stainless steel percolator. MMMM it sure is good. But I can't just drink it black. I add about a teaspoon of Carnation's Creme Brulet (sp?) creamer--just enough for a little sweetness.
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Old 08-03-2006, 04:18 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Actually the freezer is not recommended for coffee storage (even by Starbucks employees). The professionals suggest coffee be kept in a cool dark area, but not the fridge or freezer as that contributes to condensation forming on the coffee itself which is not good.
So I'm on the right track GB. Would it be best to store the whole beans rather than ground? I've heard that coffee tastes better by grinding the beans right before brewing.
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