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Old 05-15-2010, 10:13 PM   #41
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I once went to a book signing event, and there was a fragrant table serving coffee. One person was grinding and pressing individual cups. The other person was hand-cranking a small bingo cage, filled with beans, attached to a small propane burner (cans are readily available at camping equipment stores). A home coffee bean roaster! I had never seen anything like it before.

My local Safeway grocery store has a fresh roast station, so I often simply ask the barrista, not for a particular bean, but "which bin is still hot?" and buy a pound to try. Along with a tub of Folgers, the darker the better.

Does anyone have experience roasting their own beans?
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Old 05-15-2010, 10:49 PM   #42
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I've experimented with roasting beans. The most critical element is temperature control. Beans can be roasted in a cast iron dutch oven, but the temperature is difficult to control. Sweet Maria web site has home roasters, and a very good selection of green beans. Sweet Maria is an interesting site for a coffee lover. Also sell some of the rarer and best coffees roasted.
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Old 05-15-2010, 11:52 PM   #43
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There is nothing quite perc'd coffee made with spring water from a well. We used to have the every weekend in the summers up at the lake.. back when I was young. Ah... memories....
I found a replacement Pyrex coffee pot for on top of the stove...I love it and use it on lazy days.
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Old 05-16-2010, 07:15 PM   #44
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love New Guinea Pea Berry ... 1/8 cup is a standard coffee measure, and I think 6 oz water is the standard coffee cup. But I know lots of folks like it much gentler than that.
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Old 05-18-2010, 06:50 PM   #45
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There are so many coffees so its hard to say. I actually live in The Middle East. I like Arabic/Turkish coffee but it is strong. I do not drink it all the time. I drink it for a pick me up though when needed, your not supposed to drink the muddy part at the bottom though.

Where I live the coffee is different. It is made with ground green beans (not roasted) with water and cardamom, its nice. They also make a coffee here in the south with the muddy part and it has a thick texture and distinct taste.
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Old 07-05-2010, 06:02 PM   #46
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Mollyanne.......I'm heading out to TJmax. Thanks for the tip!!
Kona coffee is only surpassed by "Blue Mountain Jamaican." in my opinion.
As Scooby-doo would say, "Ruh-Ro".
I messed up. I acted like The Grand Poo-bah of Coffee here and posted that the best coffee is ground Hawaiian Kona purchased at TJ Maxx and that they also had ground Blue Mountain Jamaican. Well, the other day I was in TJMaxx and purchased the ground Blue Mt Jamaican, brought it home, opened it, noticed my daughter's bag of Whole Food's 365 on the counter that she ground herself, opened her's to compare aroma, and Holy Coffeebeans, Batman!...365 won hands down! My daughter says it's because she grinds it herself on the spot in the store but, but, but,...i wanted to argue with her and say that the expiration date is good for a year on the one I got at TJMaxx...but the difference was just wayyy too huge to even bother to argue!

So now I'm backpeddling here and saying that "Whole Food's 365" brand that you grind yourself is the best coffee....and it's organic.


But I humbly admit, I'm still not The Grand Poo-bah of Coffee

.
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Old 07-05-2010, 07:15 PM   #47
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good coffee is so difficult to find because everyone mass produces it now. about 2 years ago i found a roaster close by and have been a loyal customer since.
i do believe that there is a large advantage in fresh stuff. keep whole beans in an air tight container in the pantry and grind just before brewing. also the way it is roasted is important, barrel roasters seem to be the best. i believe most whole foods do an air roast, which can crisp a bean too fast. dont forget to make it in a french press too.
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Old 07-05-2010, 09:33 PM   #48
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I've gotten to like New Guinea whole bean (pea berry) and when Cosco or Trader Joes has it, I'm happy. Otherwise I like Columbian (Cosco). I have a friend who keeps me stocked from time to time with his own roasted coffee, usually very good.
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Old 07-05-2010, 11:06 PM   #49
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good coffee is so difficult to find because everyone mass produces it now. about 2 years ago i found a roaster close by and have been a loyal customer since.
i do believe that there is a large advantage in fresh stuff. keep whole beans in an air tight container in the pantry and grind just before brewing. also the way it is roasted is important, barrel roasters seem to be the best. i believe most whole foods do an air roast, which can crisp a bean too fast. dont forget to make it in a french press too.
I don't believe that good coffee is hard to find. Good coffee is not cheap. Good quality Blue Mountain will cost over $30/pound. Kona $15 +. Anything else is probably a blend. That may not be bad, but it will not be Kona or Blue Mountain. Most medium to large cities have retail roasters, if not, there is the internet. IMO, grinding immediately prior to using, and using a french press or something similar is your best bet. My current favorites are coffees grown around Boquete, Panama. Janson Family, Finca Lareda, and Esmerelda are my favorites, but they are almost impossible to find. For my taste, Costco Columbia Supremo is among the best lower cost coffees.
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Old 07-08-2010, 08:21 AM   #50
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We have a couple of roasters here and they make excellent coffee. I get it locally and grind it in-store. I can't seem to get the right grind when I do it at home, so I turned my coffee grinder into a spice grinder.
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