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Old 09-11-2008, 06:04 PM   #11
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Almost forgot the most important thing. The answer is NO, you cannot let it sit out for 4, 5, or 6 hours. It will separate and be horrible!
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Old 09-11-2008, 06:08 PM   #12
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This is good to know. My interest is indeed two-fold. I both need that initial kick and I simply like the taste.

As stated, I burned out a Krupps cappuccino machine. My friends and I would sharpen on weekends, we'd keep that machine brewing espresso, and we'd froth milk and flavoring by the quart. Good times.

And while I do enjoy Japanese history, my heritage is from Milwaukee in the early 1950's. Talk about a melting pot, I don't even know who was Sicilian and who was Polish. All of those good ethnic baked goods and morning coffee my Mother's group enjoyed are all lost to time.

My niece is a barista, so at least the coffee is above average, and I enjoy the darker Italian blends. When eating at a local Sicilian restaurant, I always have amaretto cappuccino for desert.

I assume from the answers, preparing the components to sit out overnight is no problem.
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Old 09-11-2008, 06:32 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
Almost forgot the most important thing. The answer is NO, you cannot let it sit out for 4, 5, or 6 hours. It will separate and be horrible!
I meant the actual coffee, in the machine, in the basket, no water added except that held in the reservoir.

The dairy products will still be refrigerated.
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Old 09-11-2008, 07:08 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chico Buller View Post
I meant the actual coffee, in the machine, in the basket, no water added except that held in the reservoir.
Yes you can do that without problem.
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Old 09-11-2008, 07:12 PM   #15
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I just thought I'd check. I can see that no harm would come to robusto beans, they're almost grown to be abused. If it was a matter of just keeping a pre-measured filter in the frig for a last minute installation, even that might be done.

But the lid on the coffee maker snaps down pretty tight.
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Old 09-11-2008, 09:52 PM   #16
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Gosh, I hate to be the one to disagree, but coffee brewed in a regular drip coffee maker is NOT espresso, and make it as strong as you want, but it never will be. Here is what Wikipedia says:

Espresso is a concentrated coffee beverage brewed by forcing very hot water under high pressure through coffee that has been ground to a consistency between extremely fine and powder.
Espresso was developed in Milan, Italy in the early 20th century, but up until the mid-1940s it was a beverage produced solely with steam pressure. The invention of the spring piston lever machine and its subsequent commercial success changed espresso into the beverage as it is known today. Espresso is now produced with 0.82–1.8 MPa (8.2–18 atm; 120–265 PSI) of pressure.
The defining characteristics of espresso include a thicker consistency than drip coffee, a higher amount of dissolved solids than drip coffee per relative volume, and a serving size that is usually measured in shots, which are between 25 and 30 ml (around 1 fluid ounce) in size. Espresso is chemically complex and volatile, with many of its chemical components quickly degrading from oxidation or loss of temperature. The most distinguishing characteristic is "crema," a reddish-brown foam that floats on the surface and is composed of vegetable oils, proteins and sugars. Crema has elements of both emulsion and foam colloid.

You can buy a very inexpensive stove-top espresso maker, or you can pay thousands of dollars for a top of the line machine. We make our espresso in a Starbucks machine that cost around $399 several years ago, and we use the espresso to make lattes, both hot and iced. Coming from the Northwest, I guess you could call us a little obsessive/compulsive about coffee....
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Old 09-11-2008, 09:56 PM   #17
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Latte and espresso are not the same thing though. If you are going by Wikipedia for your definitions then Wikipedia will tell you a latte is just coffee and milk, not necessarily espresso and milk.
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Old 09-11-2008, 10:21 PM   #18
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While it is true that in France, for example, a cafe au lait is coffee and milk, and in Spain and Latin American countries, cafe con leche is also coffee and milk, we are talking about very very strong, rich coffee, not your normal brewed drip stuff. Wikipedia defines a "latte" as follows:

Outside Italy, a latte is typically prepared with approximately one third espresso and two-thirds steamed milk, with a layer of foamed milk approximately 5 mm ( inch) thick on the top. The drink is similar to a cappuccino, the difference being that a cappuccino has half the amount of milk. Lattes also typically have a far lower amount of foam than a cappuccino. A variant on the latte is the flat white, which is a serving fill of about one-third espresso, with steamed milk then added, while holding no froth at the top.

Sorry, GB - with all due respect, you will never get me to agree that a latte is just coffee and milk. I guess I am a recalcitrant coffee snob.


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Old 09-11-2008, 10:35 PM   #19
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Here's my recipe for a Faux Latte:
  • Combine 3oz boiling water, 1 1/2 T instant coffee and 1 T flavored coffee syrup
  • Microwave 6oz milk until it froths
  • Combine milk and coffee
It is not the same as a commercial latte but it is what my budget allows.
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Old 09-11-2008, 11:32 PM   #20
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Sounds yummy, jet! I would drink it enthusiastically, with gusto!
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