"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine > Non-alcoholic Drinks
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-30-2013, 01:22 AM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kylie1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 13,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
I use Yorkshire Tea teabags. Lovely stuff.
We get Yorkshire Tea here too GQ, it is very nice
__________________

__________________
All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt
Kylie1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 02:29 AM   #32
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 9,715
Harney & Sons has an excellent time-and-temp chart for brewing different teas. You can find it here: Harney & Sons Fine Teas - Master Tea Blenders

They have excellent teas and offer a number of them in small sample packets. I think you can order no more than 4 samples in an order. If you either "friend" them on Facebook or sign up for emails you'll find out when they offer specials. Quite often the provide free shipping if your order is $25 or more.

I want to add that John Harney, the founder of the company (and father to Michael, who wrote the brewing instructions) is a perfect dear. I had a serendipitous moment while driving back to MA from OH, taking surface roads instead of interstate ones the second day of my drive. There was a little sign at the road that said "Tea Shoppe" and pointed down a driveway. John was explaining teas and brewing to a group of people in a seminar and invited me to join in. When they headed out to drive to the processing plant he asked if I had a car (um, yeah!) and told me to follow the group. I got to see everything! It was such a fun side trip, and a perfect example of how you just have to slow down and smell the...tea!
__________________

__________________
"Eating ruins your appetite"~Mom

"A dream is a festival of lights within your mind."~~~Joan Walsh Anglund
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 03:55 AM   #33
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1
I've read your comments on brewing the tea - I totally agree with you: the brewing temperature is of the key importance! I like tea in general, but especially I'm a great green tea lover - I like to try new types of tea - both Chinese and Japanese ones.

I made a collection of different types of green tea (like Sencha, Genmaicha or Marcha) supported by some info about brewing and history of green tea.
__________________
Henry J. White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 04:49 AM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kylie1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Australia
Posts: 13,114
I also love Twinnings English Breakfast
__________________
All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt
Kylie1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 03:48 PM   #35
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 1,979
My goodness! What interesting posts - especially thank you, Janet H., for the video - it was lovely, and Cooking Goddess, you lucky duck getting practically a personal visit with a real tea man. Nice site for Harney.

I've tried my teas now -- the Oolong makes up a nice, light yellow with mild flavor, and the Pu-Erh surprised me by making a dark brew. I had one cup with orange blossom honey and one cup plain. Both so nice.

I found it handy to put the water on to boil, then, in the microwave, heat the "pot-warming" water. The timing works out well.
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2013, 04:03 PM   #36
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 6,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
I use Yorkshire Tea teabags. Lovely stuff.
My favorite as well. Do you prefer the gold or red label type?
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 05:08 AM   #37
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,502
As much as I love my Brown Betty teapot, it makes eight regular size tea cups of tea. I prefer a mug for my coffee or tea. But I can only drink one mugful at a time. That leaves the rest sitting in the leaves to get just too strong. Now if I could find three others who will drink their tea out of a mug, then I would be all set. So unfortunately I have to settle for tea bags. I do have an oversized mug that holds a half pot of 12 cup coffee. I could pour the loose made tea into that and just reheat by zapping it cup by cup. The more I try to think this through, the more my mind gets comboblicated. I will just stick with the tea bags.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 07:00 AM   #38
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,370
Extra tea is poured into a pitcher and iced for later.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 07:41 AM   #39
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Extra tea is poured into a pitcher and iced for later.
In spite of having lived in the southern part of Texas, I was never able to develop the taste for sweet iced tea. And that seemed to be the only way they knew to serve it. And when I would order only plain black tea, I got some really strange looks and questions. So I quit asking for it. I prefer my tea hot with just one scant spoon of sugar. I still get strange looks and comments. In these here parts most folks use milk and sugar. I used to drink it that way all the time with my mother. And I loved to dunk buttered stale Italian bread in it. Then when I was twelve, my aunt introduce me to drinking it black. Never went back.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2013, 07:47 AM   #40
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,370
Didn't say you had to sweeten it...
__________________

__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
So what's the proper bone to water ratio for a great broth? siniquezu Soups 18 12-19-2004 04:23 AM
proper ethnic name for a hungarian dish? zenzin International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery 4 09-05-2004 07:04 AM
Proper Pizza jacquesmontoya Pizza & Focaccia 13 06-17-2004 01:43 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.