"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking > Cooking Contests
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-15-2008, 05:15 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Chili cookoff

It's that time of year again, the annual chili cookoff that I'm destined never to win. But this year, I've been asked by a rep from the local farmer's market if I'd cook for their team. I suggested that we combine the team I created and have been working with for the past four years, the Sault Tribe Chilli Team. This would be beneficial to local produce farmers, local meat farmers, and the tribe, as it would create a synergistic union that raises money for United Way, and showcases the fresh produce from our area, and allows the Sault Tribe to support our local economy.

What I need help with is determining the amount of produce required to make 6 gallons of chili. I'll be using fresh, uncooked, unpeeled tomatoes, and the usual array of peppers, celery, onions, beans, and meat. I will be including dried kidney, pinto, and black beans. I know how much of everything to purchace except for the quantity of tomatoes. I figure that 3 of the 6 gallon volume will be taken up by tomato sauce.

If anyone knows how many tomatoes are required to make 3 to 4 gallons of tomato sauce, please share. I'm doing something I've not done before. In past cookoffs, I've only used canned tomatoes and tomato sauce.

Thanks for your assistance.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 05:55 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Good luck, GW. I know if you keep trying you'll win. You're too good at analyzing recipes not to.

Tomato cans are usually sold by weight so you could take it from there. For canned tomato, avoirdupois and fluid ounces are about one for one. So about 32 pounds of tomatos for 4 gallons of sauce. At least that's my guess.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 06:18 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Based on some canning of Chili Sauce (tomatoes & not realted to Chili) I did the other day...28 lbs would give you about 4 gallons...So Andy's scientific numbers, and my seat-of-the-pants numbers are close...Better have about 30-35 lbs on hand...

Have Fun!!!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 07:17 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
babetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: escondido, calif. near san diego
Posts: 14,349
wow that is a lot of tomatos and a lot of work. sounds yummy though.

babe
__________________
"life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain"
babetoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 09:57 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
MexicoKaren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bucerias, Nayarit, Mexico
Posts: 1,914
Goodweed, that sounds like a BIG project. Have you thought about making your own chili powder? (Of course, you probably already have your TNT recipe...just a suggestion.) Here's how I make mine, and I've also included Alton Brown's recipe that was posted a few days ago....good luck with the competition. A collaborative effort of that magnitude is always fun - and you are doing something very good for your community!

Karen's Chili Powder
6 oz dried chiles (mild, hot or combination. Ancho or pasillo are the mildest and guajillo and chiles de arbol are a little hotter. I mix them up)
2 TBS ground cumin
2 tsp ground paprika
4 tsp salt
2 tsp garlic salt
2 tsp oregano
2 tsp onion salt
2 tsp dried cilantro (I use more)

Cut off stems of chiles and remove seeds. Toast lightly on a griddle or heavy skillet, just until you can smell them (about 30-45 seconds). Blend all ingredients with chiles in a food processor until powdery. Store in an air-tight glass jar

Alton Brown’s chili powder
3 ancho chiles, stemmed, seeded and sliced
3 cascabel chiles, stemmed, seeded and sliced
3 dried arbol chiles, stemmed, seeded and sliced
2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
Place all of the chiles and the cumin into a medium nonstick saute pan or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Cook, moving the pan around constantly, until you begin to smell the cumin toasting, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside and cool completely.
Once cool, place the chiles and cumin into the carafe of a blender along with the garlic powder, oregano, and paprika. Process until a fine powder is formed. Allow the powder to settle for at least a minute before removing the lid of the carafe. Store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.
__________________
Saludos, Karen
MexicoKaren is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 10:35 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
I'll be using fresh, uncooked, unpeeled tomatoes, and the usual array of peppers, celery, onions, beans, and meat. I will be including dried kidney, pinto, and black beans.
Celery!? No wonder you never win! Just kiddin', Goodweed.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2008, 11:00 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
Celery!? No wonder you never win! Just kiddin', Goodweed.
Yea that was a new one to me, too!
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2008, 12:39 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,729
be careful, gw. you don't want to over sault your chili...

and too many hot peppers can be an as-sault to the senses, so don't over do those, either...

sault, let me say in conclusion, do your best and i'm sure that you'll be able to sault up this contest with ease...
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2008, 02:07 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
be careful, gw. you don't want to over sault your chili...

and too many hot peppers can be an as-sault to the senses, so don't over do those, either...

sault, let me say in conclusion, do your best and i'm sure that you'll be able to sault up this contest with ease...
Wow!

And MexicoKaren; I'd love to make my own chili powder, but up here on the U.S./Canada border, fresh or dried chili's can be hard to come by, if not impossible. But I will keep those recipes. They look wonderful. Thanks.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2008, 09:05 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
Jeff G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,352
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
be careful, gw. you don't want to over sault your chili...

and too many hot peppers can be an as-sault to the senses, so don't over do those, either...

sault, let me say in conclusion, do your best and i'm sure that you'll be able to sault up this contest with ease...
The trick is to balance the type of peppers to create the just the heat you want.

The last cook off I entered (and won) I had a tremendous amount of peppers, but many of them were mild. The peppers provide flavor, not just heat. I was really surprised that many of the chili makers relied on all dried spices etc for their flavors. Very few were using fresh peppers, tomatoes etc. The only dried spice I use in chili is chili powder(I like mexene, they have the mix right for me).

Before cleaning I generally have by weight about 1/2 the weight of meat in peppers... You lose a lot cleaning. I don't use the tips, and all the seeds and tops is most of the weight.
__________________

__________________
Jeff G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.