"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > I only have "these" ingredients...help me be creative
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-14-2008, 05:38 PM   #11
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
You can do an awful lot with eggs and the ingredients you have. Omelets, scrambled eggs with mushrooms, cheese, or other items added, a frittata, a Spanish tortilla.
__________________

__________________
Before criticizing a person, walk a mile in his shoes - then you are a mile away and you have his shoes!
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2008, 05:51 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
seans_potato_business's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
However, I notice that the OP doesn't mention pasta as an option. One can make a lot of very nutritious & varied meals from different pastas. Certainly pasta isn't exhorbitant in the Netherlands?
Pasta could be an option but I note that it doesn't appear to be too nutritious - just a load ol'e carbohydrates.

People talk about how many meals can be made out of chicken, but I try to base my comparisons not on how many meals some arbitrary quantity makes, but rather the weight of edible portion provided per unit cost and the nutritional value of that weight. When I earn a salary, I'll buy chicken (except I wont because I'm too squeamish to tear little bodies apart). I'm a facultative vegetarian!
__________________

__________________
seans_potato_business is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2008, 08:20 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by seans_potato_business View Post
Pasta could be an option but I note that it doesn't appear to be too nutritious - just a load ol'e carbohydrates.
Is whole-wheat pasta available to you? It has much more nutritional value than that made with white flour. Also, you might consider that adding pasta to your repertoire of recipes provides a lot more options for making tasty dishes using the ingredients you buy regularly. Consider the total nutritional value of a meal rather than each individual component.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2008, 08:23 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
One other thing - winter tomatoes, in the U.S. at least, tend to be expensive, mealy and tasteless, and I believe that most of us make red pasta sauce with canned tomatoes, so I was wondering if that might be another option for you.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2008, 09:19 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Re: pasta, as GotGarlic pointed out to you, you're not eating the pasta plain - you'd be tossing it with a sauce &/or butter/olive oil/cheese &/or vegetables, etc., etc. Same goes for egg dishes.

For someone so interested in the minutaei of "comparisons not on how many meals some arbitrary quantity makes, but rather the weight of edible portion provided per unit cost and the nutritional value of that weight", you're definitely not looking at the whole/big picture here as far as your options.

I think most of us assumed that you were/are looking for food options that were not only relatively inexpensive & nutritious, but varied & tasty as well, yet you continue to shoot down every suggestion made. I truly don't know what else to tell you.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 12:26 AM   #16
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Sean - we have had a lot of discussions about cooking on a limited budget ... so if anyone suggests something that is out of your budget it's not done on purpose, or out of insensitivity to your situation. Most of us don't live in the Netherlands, we don't know the costs of various food items available to you, or how many Guilders (oops - guess that's Euros now) you have to spend on food. So, we're all shooting in the dark when we try to suggest something to you.

Yes, meat costs more per unit weight than vegetables everywhere that I know. And, for what it's worth - liverwurst is not cheap nor is it loaded with vegetables where I live. But, meats provide flavor and protein. Look at Asian cooking for an example - limited amounts of meat to provide flavor to other ingredients. I know I often use cheap cuts like smoked ham hocks (pig's knuckles) or bacon (the British call it "streaky bacon" because of the fat) or salt pork to add flavor to dried beans. A bowl of lentils with onions and carrots served with a nice brown bread is great - and where I live very cheap.

Things that I find curiously missing from your food list are kale, cabbage, and fish/shellfish. There are a lot of things you can make with seafoods - fresh, dried or canned! I can think of a dozen recipes using fish that you can cook on top of the stove - but I don't want to suggest them if that is out of your budget - something like steamed cabbage rolls with salt cod, rice, onion, tomatoes, garlic, olive oil .... pan fried salt cod, onion and potato patties with a white sauce and peas, - you can also make a white sauce and add salt cod, peas and maybe some cheese and serve over bread - or mix with some cooked macaroni, etc. There are also fish and kale soups (even better with a little pork).

Pasta - well, most is made from semolina (not white) flour - and if made with white flour (like egg noodles) it is fortified or enriched to replace the vitamins lost in the milling process. There are a bunch of pasta sauces that don't require meat that are quite nutritious and cheap. For example - some sliced/diced zucchini squash (or eggplant) sauted in olive oil with onion, garlic, and diced tomatoes until tender ... served over fettuccine.

You could also make pierogi with potatoes and onions (add cheese if you wish - I would) and you can also add some steamed/boiled kale or sauerkraut ... boil until done and then saute in butter ....
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 11:52 AM   #17
Senior Cook
 
wysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Michigan
Posts: 446
Send a message via MSN to wysiwyg
Hoi seans potato business,
Where in the Nederlands you live? I lived there briefly (in Zaandam) on a very limited budget and I ate fish on Fridays.
Herring, Mackarel and Cod weren't that exhorbitant in price (I don't know your budget). Perhaps you can incorporate it into your diet once a week?

Pasta, regardless nutrition content, is a very efficient energy source. Check with any long distance runner on this. Besides, as many suggested, you should supplement pasta with sauches and vegetables.

Going back to your original question. Based on the ingredients you listed, I suggest you:
Rice au gratin, with broccoli or other minced veggies.
Pommes Dauphinoise
Vegetables fondue
Dutch Fish croquettes
Soups, almost any type you like
You can do Google searchs with these tittles and you will get one or more recipes.

I am not sure how old are you, what is your schedule (do you do sports?) etc. All these factors play significantly on your diet. Do not deprive yourself of essential nutrients, just because you are young. This may end up affecting you when older. I suggest you checking with a nutritionist.
Perhaps you should think of living with a roomate to improve your financial situation.

And have a Hema Worst every now and then ! LOL
__________________
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are" Anthelme Brillat-Savarin
wysiwyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 02:56 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Since you aren't avoiding meat on religious/moral principals, may I recommend cooking dried legumes or rice in a powdered chicken broth/stock? You would use it in place of salt, since many brands are quite salty. Sage and thyme go particularly well with chicken broth.

Smoked meats, while they can be expensive, can give you a lot of flavor for very little amounts of meat and they keep for a long time under refrigeration. I know that fridges are much smaller in Europe than here, so just buy a little. A small dab of a good smoked ham will flavor an entire meal.

Remember the color rule my mom taught me as a child -- there are exceptions, but as a general rule, the more color in a food, the more nutrition. It is a lot easier than reading labels. A darker green generally has more nutrition than a lighter one; a sweet potato more than a white one, a beige pasta or rice more than a white one, winter squashes more than summer. Vitamin pills are more expensive than food, and food keeps your system moving. Put veggies under the broiler, and if you have a place for a charcoal grill, you can make some wicked soup from the simplest of ingredients.

As a matter of fact, when you are on a budget, soups and stews are the answer. Many of us have been there, if not exactly in the Netherlands. Oh, are split peas available? Yellow with curry spices, or green with sage and thyme (and that touch of ham I mentioned, if you can spring for it) are usually a bargain.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 08:50 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 14
Reply for recipes

You have ingredients for a good potato soup, omelettes, salads. You need more protein. Dried beans, lentils make a great soup. I will also look through my books to see what I have.
__________________
dragonflystars is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 09:35 AM   #20
Senior Cook
 
seans_potato_business's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Posts: 244
Thanks for your replies everyone! I'm taking note of your suggestions and they are appreciated!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue-Zee-Q View Post
Hi Sean,

Here is what I do for a nice soup:

Cut one onion, and fry it in 3 tablespoons oil until it is transluscent, then add 1/2 cup of flour and stir that together. Cut up your vegetables of choice and add them to the mixture and then add about 6 cups of water and a stock cube. After your vegetables are tender (usually about 20 minutes of cooking until they are done) process the soup with your hand blender. If you have any rosemary and thyme they are good in this soup. As well, yogurt (plain or greek style) [if you have it] and milk added to it make it a nice creamy soup. I have made this soup with broccoli, carrots, and have used the same process with potatoes, turnip and carrots mixed together.

My suggestion is to baby-step your way to a full spice cupboard. Each month buy one new dried herb or spice (or as you can afford to). As well, if you have a birthday coming up, maybe your friends in the UK (you mentioned ASDA) could send you some nice and tasty herbs, spices and pulses as a 'care packet'.

I'll look through my books for ideas for you and see what I can find.
Thanks - working on the spices. It'll be a while though.

How do I incorporate sprouts into such a soup? I bought them for the first time recently. Do I cut them first or throw them in whole? Some website said to boil them whole first, and then skim the surface - what's on the surface? Nutrients?

Edit: also, why must I throw away the yellow leaves? What's wrong with them?
__________________

__________________
seans_potato_business is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.