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Old 04-01-2008, 11:53 PM   #1
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Angelica

I'm making an italian chocolate ricotta pie that calls for chopped angelica. Does anybody know what this is? Any ideas on where I can buy it, or when it is in season? The produce people at the grocery stores I've visited have never heard of it. Are there any substitutions if I can't find it? It calls for 3 tbsp, so it seems somewhat important. Thank you

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Old 04-02-2008, 12:18 AM   #2
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Here is some info on it. Looks like its limited in availability and much of it is exported from France and Italy.

Angelica - Ingredient - CHOW
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Old 04-02-2008, 01:43 AM   #3
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Welcome to DC! From the sound of it, you are after the candied version. We just used to substitute glace peel cos nobody in our family liked the taste of angelica. Never seen or tasted the fresh variety. We never missed it!!
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:34 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dejuanjaxon View Post
I'm making an italian chocolate ricotta pie that calls for chopped angelica. Does anybody know what this is? Any ideas on where I can buy it, or when it is in season? The produce people at the grocery stores I've visited have never heard of it. Are there any substitutions if I can't find it? It calls for 3 tbsp, so it seems somewhat important. Thank you
Hi Dejuanjaxon,

Angelica is a perennial plant which likes a rich soil, well drained and a position that gives it some shade. It is grown all over the globe although native to central and northern Europe - hence its use in Italian cooking. The (young) stems are normally candied, although all parts may be used. In medieval times the roots were used to make liqueurs, and medicines for stomach complaints - known as "stomach-easers" and the leaves were used for teas/tisanes and easing feversih colds! It is a self-seeding plant so it might be invasive if you grow it yourself - a bit like mint and horseradish - but like them, if you can grow it, worth putting in a pot or two to restrict its growth and enjoy. For example, the leaves may be used when baking fish.

You should be able to buy candied angelica from a good Italian Deli. You could omit the angelica from the recipe or use candied citron peel in its place. Again, you should be able to buy candied citron peel from a good Italian deli, although you may need to chop it for yourself.

Hope this helps,
Archiduc
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