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Old 02-20-2008, 08:22 PM   #1
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Brick cheese?

What can I use as a substitute for brick cheese?

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Old 02-20-2008, 09:57 PM   #2
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Question cheese

not certain what u mean. what kinda cheese? what are u using it for? need just a bit more information.

welcome,

babe
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Old 02-20-2008, 10:38 PM   #3
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While there really isn't any true substitute for real "Brick Cheese", my only suggestions would be Muenster or Havarti, although both are a bit milder.

And Babetoo - "Brick Cheese" is a relatively mild, but yet very flavorful, cheese from Wisconsin. It gets a bit stronger with age, if it's a natural "Brick". I very fondly remember vacationing in the midwest & passing farmhouses with handpainted signs out front advertising it for sale. We never went thru Wisconsin without stopping & buying some. Some of those farmers had virtual cheese "caves" in their basements. It was incredible.

Commercially, the only place I've found it for sale is Wisconsin Cheese Mart. And in fact, I was just thinking of placing an order with them for both Brick Cheese & some of their Cheese Curds as well. While I've never ordered from them for myself before, I have sent cheese gifts from them to others & have received great reports back, which is good enough for me!

Wisconsin Cheese Mart-The World's Largest Selection of Wisconsin Cheese
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Old 02-20-2008, 10:38 PM   #4
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I never knew what brick cheese was and always assumed it meant hard, but I found this on wikipedia.

Brick cheese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According to that, it's medium soft so I would think something like mozza would work. :)
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Old 02-21-2008, 01:00 AM   #5
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How about Farmers Cheese? You want something that will be very creamy when it melts. If you are not in a metro area with lots of choices, I would probably go with a straight Jack if I couldn't find Brick or Farmers cheese ... they are so soft they almost have that processed cheese texture. Muenster is heavenly (especially on a burger!), but would be stringier than creamy when melted, much like mozz or provolone.
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Old 02-21-2008, 07:12 AM   #6
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Mom used to buy brick cheese a lot when I was growing up. Today I can't find it anywhere! I miss it a lot.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:13 AM   #7
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I'm with Breezy. I'd suggest havarti, muenster or maybe jack.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:23 AM   #8
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Farmer's Cheese &/or Mozzarella definitely wouldn't be my first substitute choice. They're both WAY too mild. Wisconsin Brick Cheese isn't that bland. It starts out mild & nutty, & becomes stronger as it ages.

Kerri - what recipe are you looking to sub Brick for?
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:27 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Farmer's Cheese &/or Mozzarella definitely wouldn't be my first substitute choice. They're both WAY too mild. Wisconsin Brick Cheese isn't that bland. It starts out mild & nutty, & becomes stronger as it ages.

Kerri - what recipe are you looking to sub Brick for?
They aren't similar texture-wise either, IMO.
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Old 02-21-2008, 12:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadianMeg View Post
I never knew what brick cheese was and always assumed it meant hard, but I found this on wikipedia.

Brick cheese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According to that, it's medium soft so I would think something like mozza would work. :)
And this is why Wikipedia is not a recognized source of information. The first sentence says: "Brick cheese is a cheese from Wisconsin, USA, made in brick-shaped form, also known as a square, which can be construed as a rectangular shape."

Uh... a brick aka a square construed as a rectangle ... who writes this crap?
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