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Old 11-01-2008, 11:15 PM   #21
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Don't tell that to the scientists, teachers, and others who work so hard to create recipes for us, in order that they be successful -- not only in execution but in taste.
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Old 11-05-2008, 01:47 PM   #22
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Yeah, I've heard of an olive oil cake, which is something quite specific, in ingredient AND locale......but for people to just post these one-line answers, "yeah, you can", and to generalize and state that olive oil CAN be swapped for butter is definitely not true. People who make such statements are setting others up for disaster -- failure of the end product-- as well as a an absolute waste of other ingredients -- which can be expensive.
You're right in that what they're saying is already an olive oil recipe, but you're wrong in saying it can't be done at all. It just depends on what it's being used for. If butter is being used for flavour in baking, olive oil or any oil is no substitute, the only substitute is margarine. Pastry creams and sauces won't turn out nearly as good. But if it's being used as a TENDERIZER, butter can be substituted with shortening or oils. Obviously it will effect the outcome, both in taste and tenderness, but it can be done without screwing something up. Now you have to be careful with what recipes you choose to substitute with, but using a little common sense when thinking about what job the lipids are supposed to do in the recipe goes a long way.
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:40 PM   #23
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What is the substition i.e. 1 stick of butter equals X cup oil?
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:50 PM   #24
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Petez,
jennyema, is right but usually they are recipes that call for olive oil and one usually uses a very bland one at that.

I don't think that I would make that kind of substitution in baking when butter is required. Sometimes you can substitute regular margarine (not as healthy as butter) or the new healthier crisco without the transfat but you won't get the same result there either.

Sorry, I really do believe the answer is moderation.

When I tried to cook healthier, I turned to Cooking Light magazine and then I saw how much sodium was in their recipes. I noticed the same thing in Vegetarian Times and another mag whose name escapes me. I can't tell you how disappointing that was for me. I had to lower the sodium in my parents' diets along with the unhealthy fats.

The trick is to avoid shortcuts and all processed foods. Then, you can totally control what is in the food you are making but it takes time to cook from scratch.

As for healthier desserts, there are lots of nice books but it is a matter of degree. You take away too much fat, sugar, chocolate and nuts and your dessert will suffer.

Why not check out some books at the library and experiment a little bit?
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Old 11-28-2008, 12:14 AM   #25
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OK, I am sticking my neck out, here. A while back, I went through several months of chemotherapy, and as a supplement to that treatment, I did some nutritional things. One of the things I did was to replace nearly all the fat in my diet with raw, organic coconut oil. It has incredible anti-bacterial, anti-viral properties, and converts in the liver, so it does not travel through the arteries as a fat (no arterial plaque), and it cannot be stored as fat by the body. I have used it in cookies, cakes, pies, bread, for frying and deep-frying, sauteeing, and spread on toast. It can be used slightly above room temperature as a liquid and slightly more below room temperature (chilled is best for pastry) as a solid shortening. Works very nicely for seasoning cast iron and black steel. Olive oil is still better for salad dressings. Might consider trying it, though it can be pricey...I buy it in bulk. 5 gallons at a time.
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Old 11-29-2008, 09:20 AM   #26
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i AM ASKING BECAUSE i FIND IT MAKES THE RECEIPE MUCH MORE MOIST. Do others find that?
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Old 11-29-2008, 01:59 PM   #27
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gadzooks, I have read that coconut oil is healthy, too. I am glad that changing your life and eating habits has helped you to live healthier and longer. :-)
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:27 PM   #28
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Oil for butter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketdog1
What is the substition i.e. 1 stick of butter equals X cup oil?
I believe it's simply 1 for 1. Oil is like melted butter.
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:30 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Gadzook
A while back, I went through several months of chemotherapy, and as a supplement to that treatment, I did some nutritional things. One of the things I did was to replace nearly all the fat in my diet with raw, organic coconut oil. It has incredible anti-bacterial, anti-viral properties, and converts in the liver, so it does not travel through the arteries as a fat (no arterial plaque), and it cannot be stored as fat by the body. I have used it in cookies, cakes, pies, bread, for frying and deep-frying, sauteeing, and spread on toast. It can be used slightly above room temperature as a liquid and slightly more below room temperature (chilled is best for pastry) as a solid shortening. Works very nicely for seasoning cast iron and black steel.
Wow that's tremendous! Can you find coconut oil in any supermarket, or is it a health food store item?
Thanks for telling me about this.
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Old 11-29-2008, 05:06 PM   #30
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Health food store item, generally. Get raw, organic, not the refined(ugh!). I order in bulk from mountain rose herbs dot com. Better prices in bulk.
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