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Old 03-15-2018, 01:42 PM   #21
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It would be funny if it was not so sad, but back in Soviet Union butter was not so easy to come by. Whenever my mother would get her hands on butter she would make gee/clarified butter because of its stable shelf life. That was done out of necessity, now it's a new trend, albeit useful.

And as a side note. After gee is made, set it on water bath add a bunch of baking chocolate mix well. Now you have chocolate butter. An amazing treat. Sorry do not know the percentages.

It is still a trend.
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Old 03-15-2018, 02:20 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
Am I a clown, or is ghee nothing more than clarified butter? please clarify my doubts as well! If it's something different, please educate me!
They're essentially the same. Ghee is sometimes browned for extra flavor.
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Old 03-15-2018, 03:56 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
Am I a clown, or is ghee nothing more than clarified butter? please clarify my doubts as well! If it's something different, please educate me!

di reston


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Yes, ghee is clarified butter, but taken one step further. When you clarify butter, you strain or skim the milk solids out as soon as they separate. When making ghee, you allow the solids to remain in the butterfat and cook until they’re browned, then you strain it. The browned milk solids give the butter a dark golden hue and a delicious, rich, nutty flavor.
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Old 03-15-2018, 04:49 PM   #24
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That is why in India they use ghee. It is not new. It is for the shelf life, I use it for the high smoke point. Plus I do like the flavour as well, with no extra salt.
Only when I make a brown butter sauce - I use unclarified salted butter to brown the solids.

Ghee should be from unsalted butter. I believe in North America the quantity of salt added to butter is not regulated. You could have some butters much saltier than others. This is the reason so many recipes specify unsalted butter. You then add the amount you know will be right for the dish.
The fact you are removing the water and milk solids from salted butter is going to make your ghee extremely salty.

It is becoming more popular in North America because more people are experimenting with other ethnic cooking and trying to use ingredients as close to the original as possible.
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