"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Substitutions
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-14-2017, 01:26 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 262
I always start with a dark brown Roux. How else would you make gumbo? Maybe I should just cook it down more.
__________________

__________________
Stock Pot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 02:35 PM   #12
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 6,038
I've always put filé on the table in a little shaker jar. If people want it they can add it. I'm not a big fan myself.

I do like okra, though!
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 10:08 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
I always start with a dark brown Roux. How else would you make gumbo? Maybe I should just cook it down more.
How thick are you trying to make it? Gumbo is still a soup, not a stew.

CD
__________________
I'll just flip this omelet, and... I'm having scrambled eggs.
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 04:05 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,558
Roux for gumbo can be a light peanut butter color, dark red-brown or black depending on the gumbo you are making.
__________________
If you're gonna make a Key Lime pie, you have to use real Key Limes!
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 07:41 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,641
Also, the longer and darker you cook the roux, the less thickening power it has.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 12:05 PM   #16
Cook
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock Pot View Post
I have tried it and gone back to cornstarch for a thickener. Now, I know cornstarch doesn't hold up for leftovers, but I try to make just enough gumbo for one meal (for two) so we don't have leftovers.

Anyway, the weather is getting cold around here and perfect for this Cajun comfort food, which everybody should learn how to make.
I have been making gumbo for years. I’ve got a bottle of file in my spice rack (basically a jumble of spices overflowing from a cheap plastic grocery store box), but I’ve never used it. I’ve always used frozen, cut okra as the final thickener. I was told you could use one or the other, but not both, and my husband loves okra…
__________________
"The trouble with the rat race is, even if you win, you're still a rat" Lilly Tomlin
JustJoel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 06:24 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,579
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Also, the longer and darker you cook the roux, the less thickening power it has.
I find the benefit to a dark (chocolate) roux in gumbo is the earthy flavor it gives the broth. Any thickening is fine, but my experience eating real cajun gumbo made by real cajun "MawMaws" is that the broth is not all that thick -- just very rich in flavor.

That's why I am curious about how thick the OP is trying to make her gumbo.

CD
__________________
I'll just flip this omelet, and... I'm having scrambled eggs.
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 06:41 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
I find the benefit to a dark (chocolate) roux in gumbo is the earthy flavor it gives the broth. Any thickening is fine, but my experience eating real cajun gumbo made by real cajun "MawMaws" is that the broth is not all that thick -- just very rich in flavor.

That's why I am curious about how thick the OP is trying to make her gumbo.
I haven't had, or made, a lot of gumbo. I was just adding some information to what Craig said about cooking roux to different degrees. If the OP is cooking the roux to a dark color and then adding the same amount of liquid you would to make a béchamel sauce, that would explain why it's not as thick as she expected.

But yes, asking how thick she's trying to make it is a good question.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2017, 06:16 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,558
I should have clarified that roux is also used in other dishes like etouffee where you want it to be thick. This is how Paul Prudomme show the different colors.

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...5&action=click
__________________

__________________
If you're gonna make a Key Lime pie, you have to use real Key Limes!
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.