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Old 06-28-2013, 10:07 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metcalf.ken View Post
I don't get this Whole milk was 4% and now it's 12%?
More than cream?
It says there are 8 grams of fat in a 240 ml serving. Milk weighs about 1 gram/ml, so the milk in the picture is about 3.3% milk fat.
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Old 06-28-2013, 10:07 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metcalf.ken View Post
I don't get this Whole milk was 4% and now it's 12%?
More than cream?

Attachment 18162

See post #6 above.
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Old 06-28-2013, 10:58 AM   #13
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Thank you
but I do not savvy the math.
Cant work with Weight x Volume so
1 cup = 236.5 m.l. = 244Grams ... Close enough
What times or divided what equals 3.3

Thank You again
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Old 06-28-2013, 12:36 PM   #14
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The 12% refers to the percentage of a person's daily value of fats as a total in their diet. NOT the percentage of fat in the milk.

If you re-check the label, the serving size is 240ml and there are 8g of fat in that serving. Grams are roughly equivalent to ml in water based liquids (1.05g/ml) so 8 divided by 240 = 3.3% fat.
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Old 06-28-2013, 02:16 PM   #15
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Thank You
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:27 AM   #16
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Hello people.
I'm afraid you are (some of you at least) mixing apples and oranges.
Milk cannot be homogenized OR whole, because such a question doesn't make factual sense.
Milk can be homogenized OR non-homogenized. Homogenization is a mechanical process. It says NOTHING about fat content, it simply states how the milk has been processed.
When you open a bottle of milk which was standing in the fridge for some time and see that:
1) there is layer of SEMI-SOLID cream, almost butter on the top of the milk - that is NON-homogenized milk.
2) there is nothing special visible, the milk is all liquid with no solid layer - that is homogenized milk.
Milk of ANY fat content can be either homogenized or not. The fact is that practically all milk in supermarket is homogenized. You can find non-homogenized milk usually only in specialty stores (Natural, organic and such)

Whole milk on the other hand refers to a fat content. Milk could be whole, partly skimmed, skimmed or no fat having 3.25%, 2%, 1% less than 0.5% of fat respectively.

Thus the question is never about whole or homogenized milk, but either "whole or low fat milk" or "homogenized or non-homogenized milk".

Hope it cleared up some of the confusion.
Unfortunately, the producers don't make it any less confusing, because they are labeling 3.25% milk as "homo milk", which is technically true, but their low fat milk IS homo milk as well, only with lower fat content
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:20 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JTrucker View Post
Hello people.
I'm afraid you are (some of you at least) mixing apples and oranges.
Milk cannot be homogenized OR whole, because such a question doesn't make factual sense.
Milk can be homogenized OR non-homogenized. Homogenization is a mechanical process. It says NOTHING about fat content, it simply states how the milk has been processed.
When you open a bottle of milk which was standing in the fridge for some time and see that:
1) there is layer of SEMI-SOLID cream, almost butter on the top of the milk - that is NON-homogenized milk.
2) there is nothing special visible, the milk is all liquid with no solid layer - that is homogenized milk.
Milk of ANY fat content can be either homogenized or not. The fact is that practically all milk in supermarket is homogenized. You can find non-homogenized milk usually only in specialty stores (Natural, organic and such)

Whole milk on the other hand refers to a fat content. Milk could be whole, partly skimmed, skimmed or no fat having 3.25%, 2%, 1% less than 0.5% of fat respectively.

Thus the question is never about whole or homogenized milk, but either "whole or low fat milk" or "homogenized or non-homogenized milk".

Hope it cleared up some of the confusion.
Unfortunately, the producers don't make it any less confusing, because they are labeling 3.25% milk as "homo milk", which is technically true, but their low fat milk IS homo milk as well, only with lower fat content
Welcome to DC JTrucker. Waving from near Montreal.

You are quite right. However, at least around here, milk can be labelled as "Homo" or "Whole Milk". The "Homo milk" is 3.25% m.f. and the "whole milk" is 3.8% m.f. The "whole milk" is usually only found at the health food store or health food section of a supermarket. It is often organic and usually not homogenized.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:09 AM   #18
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Here, if it's in a store and, sold for human consumption, it's homogenized, regardless of fat content. Non homogenized is called RAW or BATH milk and, is not sold for human consumption at all, it is not pasteurized either. Again, it can be of any fat content.

Obviously, I drink whole, homogenized, pasteurized milk. Low fat or no fat milk tastes like chalk water to me - I refuse to buy it. Worth a bit more fat to get milk that tastes like milk. I'd prefer it not be homogenized but, if I want it pasteurized then, that isn't an option for me.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:20 PM   #19
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I think that "homogenized milk" getting conflated with milk of ~3% m.f. comes from the 50s, when the choices were "homogenized milk" and "skim milk" / "non-fat milk" and cream. The skim milk was so low in fat that it probably wasn't homogenized, but you never saw any cream that had risen to the top.
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Old 08-14-2017, 01:00 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by BlueMoods View Post
Here, if it's in a store and, sold for human consumption, it's homogenized, regardless of fat content. Non homogenized is called RAW or BATH milk and, is not sold for human consumption at all, it is not pasteurized either. Again, it can be of any fat content.

Obviously, I drink whole, homogenized, pasteurized milk. Low fat or no fat milk tastes like chalk water to me - I refuse to buy it. Worth a bit more fat to get milk that tastes like milk. I'd prefer it not be homogenized but, if I want it pasteurized then, that isn't an option for me.
I'm luckier than you. Just yesterday i was in health food/organic store and the were two bottles from the same farm, both 3.25% (name Avalon dairy). One homogenized and one not, marked as "whole". I bought the non homogenized (about 50˘ more ) and i had to use spoon to get through the half an inch of cream layer on top before i could pour it. And it was definitely for human consumption. And it IS pasteurized.
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