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Old 02-03-2008, 08:00 PM   #21
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I am clearly not explaining this well. (and thanks for the broiler interpretation, I'm in Canada so I understand you now)

If you use 1 cup of powdered (icing sugar) you would need to use approximately double that of granulated to give you the same sweetness in the recipe you are using. The consistency of the cookie dough will be significantly different too. If you want a certain sweetness and you make the substitution your cookie texture will be more like a sugar cookie (harder, less like shortbread) using granulated sugar.

Why don't you just switch recipes and give it another go? I have one that uses granulated sugar that works beautifully.

Also, if you turn your grill (broiler?) on and put your cookie rack on the very bottom of the oven, that might work the way you want it to. You will need to watch the cookies though.

Would you like my cookie recipe to try and see if that works for you?

Edit: Here is a good one. Its not exactly mine but I've made it and its lovely. Doesn't get any easier than this. You don't need to dip them in chocolate. Just make the cookie part.
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Old 02-03-2008, 08:15 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
I am clearly not explaining this well. (and thanks for the broiler interpretation, I'm in Canada so I understand you now)

If you use 1 cup of powdered (icing sugar) you would need to use approximately double that of granulated to give you the same sweetness in the recipe you are using. The consistency of the cookie dough will be significantly different too. If you want a certain sweetness and you make the substitution your cookie texture will be more like a sugar cookie (harder, less like shortbread) using granulated sugar.
Okay, and thanks for the recipe. As it happens, I tried that recipe last week and the result was not to my liking. It just doesn't seem to have enough ingredients? The mixture was not very cohesive and the oil separated out and was bubbling in the heat. No sir; I didn't like it :)
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Old 02-03-2008, 08:28 PM   #23
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Are you subbing oil for the solid fat in the recipe? Or did you mean the peanut butter's oil? Here is one I like a lot. You can just use 1 cup granulated white sugar if you like. I like the richness the brown sugar brings to the cookies.

1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1 cup flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 cup peanut butter
splash of vanilla

Cream shortening,peanut butter and sugars. Add the egg and blend til smooth. Add the flour and soda and finally the dash of vanilla. Either roll into walnut sized balls and flatten with a moistened fork or just drop by tsp onto a cookie sheet. Bake at 325 for 10 minutes or til just done.
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Old 02-03-2008, 08:35 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
Are you subbing oil for the solid fat in the recipe? Or did you mean the peanut butter's oil? Here is one I like a lot. You can just use 1 cup granulated white sugar if you like. I like the richness the brown sugar brings to the cookies.
I was referring to the recipe to which you had just linked, which does not specify the use of solid fat nor oil. The oil came from the peanut butter.

I'm afraid I don't have shortening, so can't follow this recipe either (although I did just follow a similar one in which I did indeed substitute oil for solid fat). Solid fat is too expensive for me at this time.
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Old 02-06-2008, 02:53 AM   #25
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LOL - you've got several problems here, Sean.

Yes - the sugar (white granulated, powdered/confectioners, brown) DOES make a difference. Yes - the fat (oil vs shortning) DOES make a difference. Unless you understand the CHEMISTRY of baking and how each ingredient works with the others ... you have only three choices: (1) Follow the recipe exactly, (2) Find another recipe that uses the ingredients you want to use that is formulated for those ingredients, or (3) expect a lot of failures.

And, the method of cooking also makes a difference. Generally (and I don't know of any exceptions to these terms): GRILLING - the heat is close to, or directly applied to, the food from the bottom, BROILING - similar to grilling, but the heat is applied a short distance (usually 2-6, but can be as much as 12 inches) from the top, BAKING - heat is applied from the top, bottom, and sides. MICROWAVING works differently - the heat is generated by the water molecules being excited (they basically vibrate) and that causes heat to be generated from the friction of their movement ... so food basically cooks from the inside out (that's just a 5-cent description).

Here is one example ... solid fats have a higher melting point than liquid oils (which are already liquid) = the higher melting point of solid fats allows the dough to "set" before the fat melts ... so the cookies do not spread as much. Altering the sugar(s) affects the browning and crispness/tenderness.

You may want to try one of these recipes:

Oil cookie recipes
Microwave cookie recipes

Hope this gives you a workable solution.

Oh, by the way - what brand and model of grill/microwave do you have? If we had an idea of what you are cooking with we might be able to give you some better answers not only here but in some of the other threads you have started.
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Old 02-08-2008, 11:40 PM   #26
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Sugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by seans_potato_business View Post
But if the sugar dissolves first, then the mixture should be exactly the same and therefore produce the same results, right?

Of course if not, then I guess melting comes into play. Anyway, I'd never considered melting or anything, and always assumed it was being completely dissolved so I guess that was my mistake. Thanks.
Sean,
In my experience, sugar requires the application of heat to convert it from a solid, i.e., granulated, caster, icing or powdered sugar to a LIQUID (sugar syrup). Surely it is axiomatic or self-evident that the large the grain the more heat is required to convert each grain to a liquid syrup or to a liquid?

When heat, as in cooking, is applied the sugar must first be melted before being MELDED with other ingredients. Granulated sugar, added to the same proportions of fat, flour and sugar in a creamed sponge will not produce the same result as that using caster sugar. If you don`t believe me, try it.

Let me know how you get on and how you cleaned/cut the sponge!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Regards,
Archiduc
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Old 02-09-2008, 06:35 PM   #27
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Someone should pose these questions to Alton Brown, LOL.
He is coming to Chicago March 15th, I am begging DW to let me go! The tickets are rather steep...
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:31 AM   #28
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If you have one of the Magic Bullet things, you can make caster sugar from Granulated sugar, saves having to buy both.
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Old 02-22-2008, 05:18 AM   #29
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I don't know how helpful this will be to your understanding - the recipe seems to be quite a good biscuit[cookie] recipe ..

Creaming the butter and sugar develops air cells in the batter, which helps give volume and texture. The grains or crystals cut through the solid fat allowing air to be incorporated into the mixture.

A creamed mix that has been correctly mixed has an even distribution of fat/air/sugar throughout the dough. The sugar acts as a tenderizer by absorbing water when the egg is added to the creamed mixture. It provides structure to the mass and allows the flour to be added in a way that the gluten is not overdeveloped..

As powdered sugar lacks the granular or crystalline structure to cut through the fat, fewer air bubbles will be formed, resulting in a denser, flat product. Using a mixture of both granular and powdered sugar sorts out that problem..

Many things can influence the spread of the cookie: the use of shortening with a higher melting point than butter: the length of creaming time - the sugar needs to be finely distributed: the use of powdered sugar to produce a fine-grained compact mass: and after the flour is added, mixing well to build a firmer structure.

The recipe seems to cover many bases with regards to producing a good product .. it is a pity mine don't like peanut butter biscuits .. or I would have a try ..
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