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Old 02-13-2009, 01:34 PM   #1
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Substituting Skim for Whole Milk

My wife just asked me a question that has occurred to me in the past, and although I think I know the answer, I though I'd see what you guys think.

She was making a grocery list for next week, and had selected a recipe for chicken and dumplings. The recipe calls for a cup of whole milk in the dumplings, which we rarely buy (her idea, not mine). She asked if we could use skim (nonfat milk) instead, and I said sure, just increase the butter a tad.

Any negatives to doing it that way?

Thanks.

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Old 02-13-2009, 01:45 PM   #2
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According to Tyler Florence from the Food Network, just yesterday on Tyler's Ultimate he said to never substitute whole milk for anything less. He said it's hard on some people but it's worth buying a small bottle to keep just for recipes. It had to do with binding and if it's a dumpling recipe, you'll want it to bind correctly, the skim will cause separation, according to Tyler.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:02 PM   #3
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Hi. I am thinking it would all depend on the exact use. In some applications I am sure it would matter more than others.

In an ideal world we would have all the kinds of milks and degrees of creams available at all times; for me that is unrealistic. If it is a super special thing for company, etc, I would probably use whole milk, but for an ordinary down-home dish like chicken and dumplings I cant see how it could possibly matter with that bit of butterfat added back in.

As for the recipe for the chicken and dumplings .... Scotch, I would like to see yours if you would share it. I didnt get my grandmother's while she was still alive and I've spent several years getting to where I like it pretty well now. I prefer mine more firm than the 'light and fluffy' type that many seem to like.

I have just been on here three days, but I must say this is a most interesting place, and I am enjoying being here. Thanks.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DownByTheRiverSide View Post
Hi. I am thinking it would all depend on the exact use. In some applications I am sure it would matter more than others.

In an ideal world we would have all the kinds of milks and degrees of creams available at all times; for me that is unrealistic. If it is a super special thing for company, etc, I would probably use whole milk, but for an ordinary down-home dish like chicken and dumplings I cant see how it could possibly matter with that bit of butterfat added back in.

As for the recipe for the chicken and dumplings .... Scotch, I would like to see yours if you would share it. I didnt get my grandmother's while she was still alive and I've spent several years getting to where I like it pretty well now. I prefer mine more firm than the 'light and fluffy' type that many seem to like.

I have just been on here three days, but I must say this is a most interesting place, and I am enjoying being here. Thanks.
Thanks for the input, but as for the recipe, it's just from one of our gazillion cookbooks. Nonetheless, I'll scan it and post it.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:30 PM   #5
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After scanning the recipe and sending it to DBTRS, I see that it actually calls for only cup of milk -- and I ain't buyin' no quart of milk for that -- and 3 tablespoons of butter, which is worked into the flour before adding the milk. I'll increase that to 3.1 tablespoons of butter and call it done.
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Old 02-13-2009, 02:33 PM   #6
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What about buying a kiddy size for less than a dollar? The kind they sell at the gas station? Altering the butter may work against you.
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Old 02-13-2009, 05:11 PM   #7
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What about buying a kiddy size for less than a dollar? The kind they sell at the gas station? Altering the butter may work against you.
Store I go to doesn't stock anything under a quart. Maybe I'll go over to the elementary school -- it was 6 for a of a pint when I was a kid. Do you think it's gone up?
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Old 02-13-2009, 05:13 PM   #8
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Store I go to doesn't stock anything under a quart. Maybe I'll go over to the elementary school -- it was 6 for a of a pint when I was a kid. Do you think it's gone up?
Check the gas station. I believe you said you are in LA and ALL the stations there carry those little bottles inside especially Arco, Shell, 76, Chevron, et al.
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Old 02-13-2009, 08:14 PM   #9
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Within the context and intended use of the original question ... you are right Scotch. It's a matter of the butterfat content - just add a tablespoon of butter to a cup of "almost milk" and warm it just enough to melt the butter to get the butterfat content of real milk (;grins) which is about 4%. You could probably leave out the butter and not suffer any problems - your dumplings would just not be as "rich" tasting.
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Old 02-13-2009, 08:57 PM   #10
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You can, but your best bet in that case is fat free evaporated milk.
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