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Old 06-13-2009, 07:45 PM   #1
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Substitutions for all-purpose flour

I'm using some in the "cheese" part of a macaroni and cheese recipe; cooked with milk, butter, cheese, and some spices.

I don't have any all-purpose or whole wheat flour on hand, only buckwheat flour, potato flour and brown rice flour. The recipe I want to use calls for 3 tbsp of all-purpose flour. Can I use any of those flours in place of all-purpose with no problems?

(disclaimer if this is a stupid question: I'm very new to this thing called cooking)

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Old 06-13-2009, 08:29 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forum!

I would use any of your three flours. You could use one tablespoon of each! Maybe I would have a slight preference for the potato flour, but in a pinch, any will work.
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Old 06-13-2009, 08:55 PM   #3
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thanks for answering my question :)
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Old 06-13-2009, 10:58 PM   #4
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Use the potato flour, which is the most neutral in flavor, but try about 2 tablespoons of it as I believe it will thicken your sauce more than wheat flour.
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Old 06-13-2009, 11:30 PM   #5
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The problem with cornstarch and potato starch (flour) is that they do not stand up to heat very well. Both these starches will breakdown if boiled.

I'd go with the brown rice flour.
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Old 06-13-2009, 11:35 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
The problem with cornstarch and potato starch (flour) is that they do not stand up to heat very well. Both these starches will breakdown if boiled.

I'd go with the brown rice flour.
i always had the experience that starch wouldn't get thick UNTIL it boiled. do you mean if it is boiled for a longer time after it thickens? i have never had that problem.
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Old 06-13-2009, 11:53 PM   #7
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i always had the experience that starch wouldn't get thick UNTIL it boiled. do you mean if it is boiled for a longer time after it thickens? i have never had that problem.
Flour will reach full thickening ability around the boiling point and hold that thickening ability if it is cooked further.

Potato and corn starch thicken at below the boiling point but will lose their thickening power if boiled for an extended period or if subjected to higher temperatures.
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Old 06-14-2009, 12:34 AM   #8
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Flour will reach full thickening ability around the boiling point and hold that thickening ability if it is cooked further.

Potato and corn starch thicken at below the boiling point but will lose their thickening power if boiled for an extended period or if subjected to higher temperatures.
ok so mac and cheese doesn't cook that long wouldn't the potato flour be ok for her recipe?
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Old 06-14-2009, 10:47 AM   #9
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ok so mac and cheese doesn't cook that long wouldn't the potato flour be ok for her recipe?

Possibly. I recommended rice flour to offer a surer solution.
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