"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Substitutions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-05-2014, 12:06 AM   #31
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Arrowroot as a thickener is supposed to be diabetic friendly, though I've never used it, and not diabetic yet, thankfully.
I've used arrowroot for thickening. I didn't notice that it did any better than cornstarch. Also, arrowroot is much more expensive than cornstarch. $6 for only an 1.87 oz. jar.
__________________

__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 05:57 AM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Thanks S&P. Unfortunately, flour and cornstarch are no longer an option for me, so that's why I am looking for other alternatives.

What about guar gum? Have you ever used that?
Steve, why would wild rice flour not work? It is a grass, not a rice...a little of that goes a long way when used to thicken soups. It can't be used to make bread on its own, no gluten, but it does work as a thickener. What about pureeing vegetables (carrots, celery, leeks, etc.) with stock?
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 06:39 AM   #33
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I've used arrowroot for thickening. I didn't notice that it did any better than cornstarch. Also, arrowroot is much more expensive than cornstarch. $6 for only an 1.87 oz. jar.
When a person is Diabetic, we must find alternatives to foods if we do not want to treat our Diabetes with drugs, that involves taking a food approach to reducing our blood sugars. This conversation is not about the optimal ingredient, it IS about what works while still keeping a serious health condition under control.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 11:17 AM   #34
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,411
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Steve, why would wild rice flour not work? It is a grass, not a rice...a little of that goes a long way when used to thicken soups. It can't be used to make bread on its own, no gluten, but it does work as a thickener. What about pureeing vegetables (carrots, celery, leeks, etc.) with stock?
Hi CWS. Good suggestions, but the here's the bottom line for me, and the reason I'm looking for alternatives. Technically speaking, wild rice - or at least the part that you consume - is a seed. Most foods of this type, whether you call them legumes, grains, nuts, or seeds, contain a lot of food energy (carbohydrates) condensed into a small package. By nature, they are nutrient rich foods, but they also kick up my blood sugar.

With this current diabetic diet, I'm allowed a total of 20-30 grams of net carbohydrates (all carbs minus the fiber) per day. That's not very much. For example, a cup of cooked Brussels sprouts has 5 grams of net carbs. My two cups of morning coffee with artificial sweetener has 2 grams (sorry, gotta have it).

So every little bit adds up and I have to cut corners where I can. I can't eat things like potatoes or most root veggies because they are starchy. With the exception of things like wild berries in small amounts, fruit is completely out.

So this is why I'm seeking out alternatives. I don't like watery gravy and soups. The konjac flour that Dawg suggested above is great stuff. It will thicken hot liquids and emulsify fat just like cornstarch but, unlike cornstarch, it actually lowers blood glucose (or at least that's the claim). So I'm going to give it a try. Xanthan has carbs, but since it requires such a tiny amount to thicken liquids, it's not as bad. We'll see if it works.

I'm sure all of this sounds very extreme and that I'm limiting myself. But believe me, I'm enjoying some very tasty food right now. And for the first time in many years, I'm putting lots of butter on food and enjoying fattier cuts of meat without feeling like I'm being bad.

In time, I may be able to add back some of the other veggies I enjoy, but until I get this affliction under control, I have to make choices.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 11:24 AM   #35
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
Be cautious. Too much makes your dish gluey - gummy - mucusey. It's better for gentle thickening - not necessarily for thick gravy or soup.

Don't ask how I know this........;(
I won't ask.

I see what you mean about mucous-y. My first attempt, I mixed a half teaspoon into a cup of water, and it had all the properties of a cup of snot - or maybe Nickelodeon "slime."

Second attempt, I cut it down to a quarter teaspoon and it was more the consistency I was looking for.

Interestingly, it works in cold or hot liquids.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 11:42 AM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,104
Xanthan Gum as a thickening agent

Steve, it was Aunt Bea who suggested konjac flour, I suggested arrowroot. I had never heard of konjac, sounds interesting.

Good to know an easy recipe for snot! When I made snot with kids, the recipe was much more involved, using gelatin and corn syrup.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 11:49 AM   #37
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Steve, it was Aunt Bea who suggested konjac flour, I suggested arrowroot. I had never heard of konjac, sounds interesting.

Good to know an easy recipe for snot! When I made snot with kids, the recipe was much more involved, using gelatin and corn syrup.
Sorry DL, my mistake!
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2016, 12:41 PM   #38
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Midwest
Posts: 44
Can you use arrowroot?
__________________
fmw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2016, 01:21 PM   #39
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,113
Steve, I used xanthan gum, a tiny amount, 1/4-1/3 teaspoon in 8 ounces of my homemade liquid hot sauce. It takes a 'while' before it starts to thicken. I just added it and shook it in to disperse it. After an hour, in the fridge, it was thicker. It tended to act like jello (Firm) until I shook it again then it is pourable and thicker than a vinegar/pepper/salt solution. Don't get impatient or like me, you'll add more before you need to.

Baking with it. It acts like gluten which would help if you are baking a non-grain bread. How To Bake With Xanthan Gum

Gravy, emulsions, foams, lots of fun. How to Use Xanthan Gum - Modernist Cooking Made Easy

ETA: Xanthan Gum is temperature insensitive and sauces/gravies can be frozen and thawed without weeping or separated. (unlike cornstarch, potato flours)

It is used in such small volumes, it might not help with gut transit times. What does work is psyllium powder, about a teaspoon quickly beaten to death in cold water, followed by another cup of water. Psyllium powder is also used in some keto baking recipes for breads and cookies. If you use it in baking and eat that daily, you can skip the teaspoon in water each day.
__________________
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2016, 02:35 PM   #40
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,411
I've all but stopped using xanthan gum. My "go to" thickener these days is konjac flour. Love the stuff, although it takes some getting used to. You have to be very careful with it because it has significantly more thickening potential than cornstarch. A single tablespoon will transform a cup of liquid into a gel that will hold a spoon upright. Also, it will set up in cold or hot liquids - quicker in hot liquids, though.

As mentioned earlier, konjac is somewhat unique in that it has properties that help lower blood glucose, which is a win-win.

As far as xanthan goes, I used it in my homemade bottled hot sauce this last year. It helps keep solids in suspension, so that your sauce doesn't separate.
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.