"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Food and Kitchen Safety
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-02-2010, 12:58 PM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 64
Exclamation Chicken Handling Q's/Freezing at store

Hello everyone.
i know that you supposed to wash you hands after touching raw meat to avoid cross contamination.

however almost every cooking video i watch i constantly see people touching meat and using the same hand to shake seasonings and what not.
am i to believe that they are all disinfecting these containers after their done ?

also ive seen them after handling chicken just wipe their hands off on a towel and then touch everything ...
is this safe ?

also last time we bought a chicken i believe it sat in our fridge for 1 day and then i cut it up ... it was not completely frozen , but there was ice chunks forming on the inside.
my fridge is not that cold.

i asked someone who worked at the store after seeing a package of wings with ice forming inside.
and he just responded "never frozen " and then i mentioned about the ice and he responded the same ..defensively.
is it ok if their system is starting to freeze their chicken or what ?

thanks !

__________________

__________________
sear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 01:25 PM   #2
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA and FRANCE
Posts: 17
Send a message via AIM to HNLute Send a message via Yahoo to HNLute
I LOVE chicken, whole, pieces and parts, I know of what you speak. Storage in chain stores runs the gamut, not cool enough to frozen or nearly so, thus the ice in your chicken upon occasion. It might not have seemed it could have been frozen thus the comment by your store-person.
1. Always thaw your chicken in your refrigerator, allow 12-24 hours to thaw.
2. Thoroughly wash your hands before handling the bird or its parts.
3. Upon removing it from the refrigerator, remove from wrapper ad rinse and hand scrub under cold running water, clean out the cavity of any hanging "bits" as well and rinse.
4. Wash your hands AGAIN!
5. Pat the bird dry inside and out with a paper towel.
6. Using regular table salt, liberally apply salt to the birds interior, about 1 tablespoon.
7. Rub exterior surface with 1 Tablespoon common table salt.
8. Wash your hands AGAIN!

The bird is now ready for any operation you wish to apply to it. I like to brine all my birds before any cooking is done to them. It can be roasted as is, stuffed with your stuffing, oiled, buttered or whatever. The oint is to keep your hands and the working surfaces and the bird as clean as you can before cooking, washing and re-washing your hands is the best precaution you can take. Good luck,
HNLute
__________________

__________________
HNLute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 12:52 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
LOL - we've had several discussions on the apparent disregard for safe food handling practices by cooking demonstrators. It really boils down to the fact that they are demonstrating the preparation of a dish - not a demonstration on how to wash your hands. It is assumed that you already know how to do that so they don't need to keep showing you that aspect of cooking. And, there are some things that go on during the filming of a show that you don't see - like the little ramekin of salt they dipped their dirty chicken fingers in to season the chicken getting changed out for an uncontaminated clean one during the commercial break. The Food Network had a special on the behind-the-scenes activity that goes into filming a show and this is one of the things they mentioned.

Chicken usually sits in refrigerated open cases - so the temperature of the case must be low enough that the food on top is stored at a safe temperature. This is below normal refrigerator temps. So, it is very possible that some ice can be present on the surface of the meat (commonly the inside cavity), as you described, and yet the chicken was never totally frozen - thus, it is technically never frozen just like the guy at the store said.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 12:56 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
The USDA (or whomever) allows poultry to be labeled "fresh"/"never frozen" if it has not been held below 26 degrees.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:22 PM   #5
Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
LOL - we've had several discussions on the apparent disregard for safe food handling practices by cooking demonstrators. It really boils down to the fact that they are demonstrating the preparation of a dish - not a demonstration on how to wash your hands. It is assumed that you already know how to do that so they don't need to keep showing you that aspect of cooking. And, there are some things that go on during the filming of a show that you don't see - like the little ramekin of salt they dipped their dirty chicken fingers in to season the chicken getting changed out for an uncontaminated clean one during the commercial break. The Food Network had a special on the behind-the-scenes activity that goes into filming a show and this is one of the things they mentioned.

Chicken usually sits in refrigerated open cases - so the temperature of the case must be low enough that the food on top is stored at a safe temperature. This is below normal refrigerator temps. So, it is very possible that some ice can be present on the surface of the meat (commonly the inside cavity), as you described, and yet the chicken was never totally frozen - thus, it is technically never frozen just like the guy at the store said.
gotcha, i usually put my seasonings in a coffe cup instead of having to touch every jar.
it just seems like im washing my hands like 3-4 times while making a chicken dish ..guess thats normal.

at the store it was a younger guy who told me that , but wouldnt respond when i said never frozen ... but just starting to freeze ? - "never frozen"

i used to work at a supermarket as well and i wasnt a @#$ when people asked me questions. i got paid x per hour to work there and customers should come first. so if i spend all day helping customers find stuff and didnt get much stuff packed out ... thats just the way it was, i still leave at 5 and the next guy finshes up .....
__________________
sear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:26 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Yep, apparently the USDA does not consider 26F and above to be frozen. Here are the regulations - USDA Regulations and Policies: Fresh, "Not Frozen" and Similar Terms when Labeling Meat and Poultry Products
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:38 PM   #7
Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 64
"Any raw poultry, poultry part, or any edible portion thereof whose internal temperature has ever been below 26 degrees Fahrenheit."

it says any part .. so if the skin freezes ... they cant sell as fresh.
not sure what temp ice is exactly .. 32 ? seems like walking a fine line
maybe ill check with IR temp gauge next time
__________________
sear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:42 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by sear View Post
"Any raw poultry, poultry part, or any edible portion thereof whose internal temperature has ever been below 26 degrees Fahrenheit."

it says any part .. so if the skin freezes ... they cant sell as fresh.
not sure what temp ice is exactly .. 32 ? seems like walking a fine line
maybe ill check with IR temp gauge next time
Chicken could have been at zero degrees for a month and "they" could still call it fresh, albeit not legally.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:50 PM   #9
Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Chicken could have been at zero degrees for a month and "they" could still call it fresh, albeit not legally.
thats what i was thinking ....

do the keep the meat cooler than dairy ? if i remember correctly the open dairy coolers thermostat was always around 35F. in year i worked there i only saw like 3 products that happend to freeze...pretty sure it was ice teas on the top shelf
__________________
sear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2010, 01:52 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by sear View Post
"Any raw poultry, poultry part, or any edible portion thereof whose internal temperature has ever been below 26 degrees Fahrenheit."

it says any part .. so if the skin freezes ... they cant sell as fresh.
not sure what temp ice is exactly .. 32 ? seems like walking a fine line
maybe ill check with IR temp gauge next time
LOL - read the heading again ... it says:

Fresh, "Not Frozen" and Similar Terms when Labeling Meat and Poultry Products

The word "fresh" may not be used to describe:
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.